100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1996 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

States vote on pot,
affirmative action

NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 7, 1996 - 7A

The Associated Press
California turned its back ,n affirma-
tive action. Florida rejected a sugar tax
clean up the Everglades. And pot
' okers puffed celebratory joints in
California and Arizona after marijuana
was legalized for medical purposes.
Across the nation Tuesday, voters
decided on ballot measures ranging
from securities fraud to logging and
leg traps - all of them hot-button
issues in their states. Win or lose, they
tend to pave the way for future legisla-
tion, and national change. .
California's Proposition 209, which
kns racial and sex preferences in pub-
lic hiring, contracting and education,
was widely considered the most divi-
sive - and one of significant ballot
battles around the country.
Both sides invoked the spirit and
speeches of the civil rights movement
of the 1960s, framing the debate as a
vote on the future of discrimination and
affirmative action around the country.
Supporters argued for a colorblind
*ciety, while opponents said the move
would derail programs that counter
racism and sexism.
The final say will likely shape affir-
tmlative action programs nationally -
and will probably be decided, not by vot-
ers, but in the courts. Both sides yester-
day filed lawsuits over the measure -
proponents to get it into effect, oppo-
nents to get rid of it as unconstitutional.
"No matter what happens, this is

only the beginning of what we believe
will be a nationwide battle," said Kathy
Spillar, a leader of Stop Prop 209.
Casinos and other gambling proposals
lost out in Ohio, Arkansas, Colorado,
Nebraska and Washington. But in
Michigan, bolstered by strong support
from Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer, vot-
ers agreed to three casinos in that city.
Louisiana voters were less sure.
Given a unique opportunity to kick out
an industry that has riddled the state
with scandal, they split their decision in
parish-by-parish votes. Six parishes
with riverboat casinos voted to keep
them, 23 decided to allow it and 14
voted to keep them out; 30 parishes held
on to video poker and 34 rejected it.
The nation's views on hunting were
just as jumbled. Massachusetts and
Washington banned the use of dogs and
bait to hunt bears while Michigan and
Idaho rejected such restrictions. Oregon
refused to repeal a 1994 ban on similar
practices while Colorado banned leg
hold traps and Alaska banned tracking
wolves from airplanes.
Environmental battles also attracted
big money. In Florida, $23 million in
advertising by sugar companies and
farmers helped persuade voters to reject
a penny-a-pound sugar tax for
Everglades cleanup. Fertilizer runoff has
polluted the fabled "River of Grass," but
the voters refused an effort to make
farmers pay almost half the enormous
costs of restoring the wetland.

, a

EYE EXAMS AND EYE GLASSES I.

AP PHOTO
Edmund Wong, a Junior at the University of California at Berkeley, shouts his disap-
proval of Proposition 209 during a march with other Berkeley students yesterday
in Berkeley, Calif.

VROTEST
Continued from Page 1A
Daily was stolen from the racks. Left
behind were signs accusing the Daily of
racism. The Washtenaw County
Prosecutor's office refused to press
charges, saying that Michigan larceny
statutes do not make it a crime to steal a
free-drop publication.
Coleman said he estimates the recent
efts will cost The Daily Californian
more than $15,000, which includes the
BAKER
Continued from Page 1A
irrelevant when making decisions
affecting the University.
"1 cannot think of any issue in four
years where we had a split among parti-
tan lines" said Regent Rebecca
.cGowan (D-Ann Arbor). "I think
what people do when they're elected is
they move from being partisan. Their

cost of advertising and an additional
4,000 papers that were printed and dis-
tributed Tuesday afternoon.
Campus police have classified the
incident as grand theft, Coleman said,
but city police are considering it to be
theft.
Both campus and city police are cur-
rently investigating the case.
"It's a free paper, but only free in
limited quantities," Coleman said. "I
don't think 22,000 is a limited quanti-
ty."

Coleman said The Daily
Californian intends to prosecute the
case.
Coleman said The Daily
Californian has not yet contacted an
attorney and plans to present their
case to the city after "gathering more
information."
Coleman said the issue was not just
monetary and that it "involved some
issues of free speech."
"I'd like to know how those people
(protesters) would feel if I turned off

their microphone," Coleman said.
"That's kind of what happened to us. I
find it almost ironic that they did this.
It's like saying you can have free speech
if you say what we want."
Yvonne Choong, a student govern-
ment official at Berkeley, said she didn't
see a lot of student support for the theft.
"If we're going to support free
speech, we're going to have to support
it all," Choong said. "I don't think their
ability to spread information should be
obstructed at all."

ftH THE BEST PLACES SPRING BREAK
TO GO FOR Round Trip from Detroit

DENVER
March 1-8, 1997 from
AIR ONLY $.3990
Copper Mountain Resort
8799 6 )99990(4 people)
Lif I~kfsinclud ed!
FLORIDA froml890
NONSTOP
Tampa Bay Mar. 2-S
St. Pete Mar. 1-8
F.t Myers Mar. 1-8
Orlando Mar. 1-8
ARUBA March 1-8, 1997
Mill Resort-1st Class, Across fm beach

ACAPULCO
March 2-9, 1997
I Quad Occ. Tl . Occ. Dbi. Occ.
$6 6 9 9 s99
CANCUN
March 1-,, 1997 March 2-9, 1997
Qua Occ. 1I. Occ. Dbl. Occ.
$6290 90% $ s 90
For Reservations
orCIormation
(313)327-0049

responsibility is to members of the
University community."
Horning agreed, saying that although
the shift matters, the politics of the 5-3
board should not have a detrimental
effect.
"There are five Democrats and three
Republicans, but there better be eight
people who want the best for the
University,' Horning said. "We have to
keep our sight on the University, who-

ever is sitting on the board."
Duderstadt, who presided over the
last Democratic board, said it was easi-
er to work with the 6-2 board.
"Some aspects in the dynamics of the
6-2 board were easier because it was
usually easier to identify the point
leader of the board, when you have one
party to caucus and select that person,"
Duderstadt said.
Baker said one of the things that

gives him satisfaction is knowing that
he represented a conservative view that
is not always recognized on campus.
"Scores of young people have told
me they appreciate the presence of an
individual who represents the conserva-
tive view," Baker said.
Baker said he would not seek anoth-
er term as regent in future elections, but
he would be available for service to the
University if he were asked.

®i.

Quad Occ. Tpl. Occ. Dbl. Occ.
57199015779g0 %79

Prices are per person and include Federal Excise Tax, but not airport passenger facility charge ($3 - $6).
International taxes not included for Cancun, Acapulco, or Aruba ($22.95 - $36.45). Participation contract
required. Prices vary by date and are subject to change. Reversals are OK! See brochure for more details.

\r

STUDENT WORK
$10.25
Local company must fill 18 positions ASAP.
Full-time/ part-time/ weekends available. Call
971-6122 10-4 p.m.
SUBJECTS NEEDED for cognitive
psychology, reaction time experiment, right-
handed, native English speaker, normal
vision and hearing. Pay $5.50/hr. or by
experiment. Call 936-2056.
THE PERFECT summer-time business
mortunity. 6 week return on investment.
at 810/984-4663.
VERY ATTRACTIVE FEMALE needed
for fun and exciting job doing massage. Very
clean, safe, discreet, and non-sexual. No exp.
nec. A2 area. Great Pay, Leave message 412/
734-8334.
WINTER BASKETBALL- Ann Arbor
Community Education & Recreation is now
taking employment applications for side
supervisors, crowd control, scorers & timers
for adult basketball. For more info call 994-
2300 ext. 225 or 235.
0RK AT HOME: Earn $300-$700+/wk.
*embling various products. Call 800-698-
07 ext. 111. Work is Guaranteed!!
WORK STUDY JOB
Office help needed Wednesday mornings and
Fridays all day. Call Linnea Perlman, In-
stitute for the Humanities 936-3518.
WORLD'S GREATEST wanted - manage-
ment opportunities available at Jimmy
John's. Stop by 929 E. Ann w/ resume or fax
it to 313/913-0955.

$29 SPRING BREAK PACKAGE.
Boardwalk Beach Resort - Panama City's
Spring Break headquarters. Only $29 per
person. Restrictions apply 1-800-224-4853.
$AAA! Cancun & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & Hotel From $3991
Prices Increase Soon - Save $150 On Food,
Drinks & Free Parties! 111% Lowest Price
Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-800/
678-6386.
Ro Dosa S
-W - W

***FREE TRIPS AND CASH!***
Find out how hundreds of student
representatives are already earning FREE
TRIPS and LOTS OF CASH with America's
#1 Spring Break company! Sell only 15
trips and travel free! Cancun, Bahamas,
Mazatlan, Jamaica or Florida! CAMPUS
MANAGER POSITIONS ALSO
AVAILABLE. Call Now! TAKE A BREAK
STUDENT TRAVEL (800)95-BREAK!
2 UM SEASON HOCKEY tickets for sale.
Best offer. Call Don @ 973-0788.
FREE LUNCH AT The Kerrytown Bistro
by booking your Sp ring Break at Stamos
Travel on Nov. 17! Open house special!
NEED 3 TICKETS together Penn State.
boblewis@umich.edu or call 763-6729.
PENN STATE/U OF M football tickets for
sale. Great seats! Call 332-1273.
ROMANTIC ESCAPE - Cozy log cabins,
$54-75 nightly, incl. hot tub, canoes, & more.
Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
SPRING BREAK reps. wanted Acapulco
from $529, Cancun from $42990, other des-
tinations avail. Call Dan at Regency Travel
665-6122. 209,S. State Street.

JOIN THE MICHIGAN SKI TEAM: in
Jackson Hole, WY, Jan. 2-8 for only $645 w/
airfare. Call Brad @ 677-2744 for more
information.
THE BEST GIFT
Name a STAR for someone. Just $33.
Celestial Registry. 1800/446-3985 X1010.

LOOKING FOR fer. roommate to share
very lg. rm. in Victorian hse. 668-4796.
WANTED FEM. to share lg. 3 bdrm. apt.
Great loc. Please call Anne 332-1612.

SPRING BREAK 1997-Organized trips
Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, Mazatlan,
Florida. Guaranteed lowest prices. Send
mail to melissa@umich.edu

to
&
!e-

BABYSITTER NEEDED 2 or 3 aftemoons/
wk. Must drive. Excellent pay, great kids.
Call 663-6030.
BABYSITTER WANTED Wed. afternoon
& 1 weekend day. $7/hr. 998-0464.
CHILD CARE in my home for children 11
& 8 yrs. M, T, W 3:15 - 6 p.m. $7/hr. ref.
Non-smkr., own car. 9942964 after 6 p.m.
&jIILDCARE NEEDED in our N.E. Ann
r home for 9 month old. Schedule &
terms negotiable. 995-9780.

DRIVE YOJRSEZ T & SAVE !
o Otr'
0
4 .4
PE PE RSDEE09#oNDSTIATONIBREA A1 S IIEGHSTAY 4
L I tVLCTIh1/ U A VI '

STS SPRING BREAK '97. Trips to Cancun
& Jamaica. Call 665-6268 for info.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE in the U.S. on
Continental $159 or $239. Bring your Con-
tinental voucher & AMEX card. Doris at
Regency Travel, 209 S. State, 665-6122.
TIX:BIG HEAD TODD Fri. Nov. 8, 8 p.m.
Main floor best offer. Call 332-6185.
TOP $ FOR Ohio State Tix.
amidei@umich.edu or 764-3266.
TOP DOLLAR for UM hockey tix: full or
half season or singles. Dan 662-8497.
WORLDWIDE LOW air fares. Reserve
your Christmas space early. Regency Travel
209 S. State St. 665-6122
HERB DAVID GUITAR Studio 302 E.
Liberty, 665-8001. Lessons lessons lessons.
Repair repair repair. Not just guitar.

TIOS DELIVERS Ann Arbor's best
Mexican style food. Call 761-6650.
Tios Mexican Restaurant
333 E. Huron.

F

:SENIORi
ENSIA
PORTRAITS
November 11-14
MICHIGAN ROOM
November 15, 18-20

LOVE THROUGH ADOPTION. Happily
married couple wishes to adopt an infant, a
life time of love, happiness, security, and op-
portunity await a newborn child. If you are
pregnant or know someone who is, and con-
sidering adoption. Please call Cathy and Paul
1-800-550-8122.
02 pefi"s _

FREE RENT from Dec. in 1-room eff. apt.
in basement (with separate entrance) of home
in quiet neighborhood on west side, in ex-
change for babysitting 15 hrs./wk. for sweet,
lovable 2 yr. old girl (weekdays 5-6 p.m. plus
1A hr...n wkds) 994-324.

h

- In .. V

m

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan