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October 31, 1996 - Image 21

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-31

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14B Thchigan Daily Weeke a e - Thursday, O er 31, 1996

i'i ix _. r ...

The Michigan 1 Da ekeM

Wastenaw Coqutyraces J
Tree vie for judges
inmar

By Katie Piona
Daily Staff Reporter
One man will get left in the dust when the voters of
Washtenaw County choose two out of three candidates to sit
on the bench of the 22nd Circuit Court.
Two candidates, Judges Donald Sheldon and Patrick
Conlin, are up for re-election, while newcomer Peter Collins*
is trying to grab one of two positions for a six-year term.
Sheldon, who graduated from the University Law School,
was a'practicing attorney in Ann Arbor for 20 years before
being appointed to the bench by former Gov. James Blanchard
in 1990. He was then elected to the bench later that year.
"I became a judge because I saw it as an opportunity to
have an impact on people's lives;' Sheldon said. "It is an emo-
tional and intellectual challenge to try to change people's
lives for the better every day."
Collins, a 1970 graduate of Western Michigan University
Law School, said the position carries with it a certain weight.
"There are few positions that have more direct impact on
the lives of individual citizens," Collins said. "I think it is the
most important work I can do."
After graduation, Collins worked as a federal clerk until

1972, when he went into private practice as an attorney.
Conlin, who has lived in AnnArborhis entire life and grad-
uated from the University Law School in 1961, has sat on the
bench since 1972.
"I have such a vast array of experience, substantially more
than any judge in Washtenaw County,"Conlin said. "I was the
youngest judge ever elected in Washtenaw County."
Sheldon said he relies on his professional training and sense
of "rightness" in the world todo his job fairly. He said his duty
is to "do the right thing and if the right thing were easy, the job
wouldn't be as challenging as it is. It's supposed to be hard."
Each candidate emphasized the importance of being fair.
"That is always paramount in my mind," Conlin said. "I
must be fair to everybody"
Collins agreed. The "greatest requirement I think is to be
absolutely impartial in those cases that come before the
court" he said.
Sheldon, who has had "more of my share of high-profile
cases," said he is dedicated to making sure everyone receives
a fair trial and that nothing gets in the way.
"That's what equal justice is supposed to be about;'
Sheldon said.

City Concl
5th Ward:
Still looks
to Students.
3y Wil Wdisewt
Daily Staff Reporter
While Ann Arbor's fifth Ward is not
an area of town where many students
live, the candidates running for the
ward's City Council seat say student
concerns will not be overlooked.
Democratic incumbent Elisabeth
Daley said one of her primary concerns
is the income tax increase and property
tax decrease being independently stud-
ied and its possible impact on students.
"I came here as a student and until a
year and a half agoI was a renter"
Daley said. "The possible income tax
increase may have a major financial
impact on renters, many of whom are
students - I want to make sure stu-
dents are bearing the double burden of
high rental prices and the income tax."
Republican challenger Ren Synder
said the income tax would raise students'
taxes without giving them any breaks.
"This income tax will adversely
affect students;' Synder said. "If you
are a student, your taxes will go up and
because you probably don't own prop-
erty. You get nothing back that will off-
set your tax increases,"
Synder, who described himself as a
political independent, said he was less
interested in party philosophies than in
doing an effective job for the city.
"I'm running as a Republican, but
everything I've done has been on a non--
partisan basis,' Synder said. "Elisabeth.
(Daley) has said publicly that she wants
a Democratic council -'big D' poli-
tics. I don't think either party is right all
the time and I don't want the best
Democratic or Republican team - I
want the best team period."
Daley said it is the City Council's
responsibility to shelter the city from
spending cuts initiated by the governor
and other state officials.
"Cuts at the state and local level will
have a big impact on the city," Daley said.
Daley has been on the council for
two years. Synder works as a local real-
tor and is a member of the State Street
Area Association.

VOWEr
*f The mnap bbelow shows what the ward
boundaries are. A voter identification card
will list in which precinct you have to
vote.

winu Whswt
Daily]F StffReporer,
The race for the City Council's fourth Ward seat pits
a self-proclaimed "financially conservative"
Democrat against a younger Republican challenger
hoping to appeal to the "new breed" of student
Republicans.
"I am very financially conservative -I always
want to know where the money is going to come
from," said Democratic incumbent Stephen Hartwell.
"I am liberal when it comes to social issues, but I
won't implement programs without knowing how
they will be paid for - that sometimes irks other
Democrats.'
Hartwell, 40, boasts he voted against every tax
increase that came before him during his tenure on
city council.
Republican challenger Patrick McKeon, 32, said he
would bring a new and fresh perspective to the coun-
cil and hoped his youth would appeal to both students
and resident voters alike.
"I am the youngest candidate running and I hope I
will appeal and relate to the students" McKeon said.
"I am a Republican, and sometimes students tend to
vote Democratic -- but I believe that there are a new
breed of young Republicans who will help elect
someone like me.'
McKeon said safety was one of his most important

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314 E. Liberty, Ann Ar bor
EVERY WEDNESDAY EVENING.. .
the Mainstreet Comedy Showcase
hosts an evening of improvisational comedy with the
Portuguese Rodeo Clown Company and YOU the audience. Join us
in an evening of 2 parts improv and 1 part stand-up comedy.
31 BERT CHALLIS Is 1a
1 He writes for the Tonight Show with Leno and the i am
2 Mother Goose and Grimm comic strip in the newspaper. 'rece
Regular ticket price,$10 Con
6 INVASION OF IMPROV
Ticket price: $6
7 DEAN HAGLUND
S From the hugely popular FOX TVs "X-FILES," its T
another Mainstreet debut! He plays Langly, one of
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an evening of comedy and "X-Files" improv.
Regular ticket price: $10r
13 INVASION OF IMPROV
Ticket price: $6

14
15
16

STUNT JOHNSON THEATER
From "America's Funniest People" we present this irreverent group of rabble
rousers with skits and parodies that will knock yer socks off!
Regular ticket price: $10

7--
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In
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TISSOT
PR 200 DIVER'S
N4
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By Wilt Wissert Bach criticized Lummf
Daily Staff Reporter detrimental to the cooperati
Both candidates for the City Council's city council members by s
second Ward, incumbent Republican unrealistic conservative goals
Jane Lumm and Democratic challenger "The major difference
Barbara Bach, want to work to integrate Councilmember Lumm andl
student involvement into community oppose (Republican nomi
affairs - but the two agree on little else. Dole and (Michigan Go
"Over my 3 1/2 years on council, I Engler,' Bach said. "Repub
have worked to get students involved in student loans ... as councilpe
our neighborhood associations, which continue to let the state and f
makes them more productive members els know what our local need
of the community," Lumm said. Lumm said safety and park
Bach, who has been a longtime local two issues most key to studen
activist and is involved in many non-prof- idents.
it organizations, agreed that the council "Safety is the issue at thet
needs to be sensitive to student concerns. list," she said. "We need to
"Students play an integral role in our lighting and expand police c
community," Bach said. "We need to the downtown areas."
involve students as citizens of Ann Lumm said joint Universit
Arbor, but also realize the University parking lots and structures V
plays a key independent role in city life." come of the city's parking wc

pus]
for being 4
on among join
ticking to area
s. lots
between - B
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nee) Bob bud
ov.) John L
blicans cut whi
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ederal lev-
s are.'
ing are the
nts and res-
top of my
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overage of
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ould solve
yes.

w a t

Whe
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mea
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ch is

for st
en we combine these lo
benefit,' she said. "The|
one of those places wh
an parking can really im
said expanding commu
olicing and involving ci
planning were importan
m said an income tax i
s being reviewed indepe

oh

20 INVASION OF IMPROV
Ticket price: $6

21
22
23

LEO DUFOUR
From the Great North Country we present one of Canada's
premiere comedians this week at the Mainstreet!
Regular ticket price: $10

th e
w o r l

d

27 GABE KAPLAN
That's right, straight from everybody's favorite
70's sit-com comes the original Sweathog himself.
Now that "Welcome Back Kotter" is sent via cable
into millions of homes on "Nick at Nite" Gabe decided
to take a break from Hollywood and Broadway and
return to stand-up where it all began for him.
Tickets: $17.50 Special Engagement
(Call for discount information)

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TISSOTu
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29
30

DENNIS REGAN
Celebrate your Thanksgiving weekend with a coup debut. The refreshing wit of this
stand-out stand-up has landed him on the stages of all the comedy cable shows.
Regular ticket price: $10
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday
112 0ff
Saturday Late Show
$M.00 Off
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g Ibon
QUALITY DRY CLEANING
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332 Maynard
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66 8-6335.

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E. LI

Pad Po'itiA Adwremnae
Christopher koib
for Mayor * Democrat -
Think Globally. Vote Locally. I was born, raised and educated in

great
Law Scl
4 --
Graduate S
Kaplan help
teachers v
skills and t
help yo
..-800-AP

un

--

F

(A11

tam ra' 'I ' Q; ,1

Ann Arbor, so wanting the best fbr
our city comes nat urally to me As a
graduate of U of M, I understand
that students are affected by city guy
ernmei, ranging from city parks to a
healthy I tron River. from off campus
housing to outr cily police That's why
its i mportant to vote in city elections.
Please support me on November 5th.

.1'.~t~~tw~~i~t~iM~i('C hJ~~.k. ~ .50I ~ P1~'I;-AI~l Al'' ,,

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