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October 28, 1996 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-28

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4B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, October 28, 1996

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GAME STATISTICS Offense finally comes
PASSING r!
Player CGA Yds TD hn io r
s:he 811184 10 through for 'M ' in big wa
Brady 2-3 13 0 0
Griese 1-1 40 1 0
Totals 11-15 237 2 0

RUSHING
Player Att
Howard 12
C.Williams15
Floyd 4
Gold 3
Anes 2
Jackson 1
Dreisbach 2
Totals 39
RECEIVING
Player No.
Tuman 3
Shea 2
Howard 1
Shaw 1
Knight 1
Streets 1
Campbell 1
C. Williams 1
Totals 11
PUNTING
Player
Peristeris

Yds
127
83
20
9
7
4
2
252

Avg
10.6
5.5
5.0
3.0
3.5
4.0
1.0
6.5

Yds Avg
101 33.7
13 6.5
12 12.0
9 9.0
40 40.0
36 36.0
27 27.0
-1 -1
237 21.5
No. Yds
3 128

Lg
86
26
11
5
6
4
7
86
Lg
63
7
12
9
40
36
27
-1
63
Avg
42.7

KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No. Yds
Butterfield 3 76
Totals 3 76
PUNT RETURNS
Player No. Yds
Winters 2 17
Totals 2 17

'Avg
25.3
25.3
Avg
8.5
8.5

L9
37
37
12
12

TD
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
4
TD
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
56
gTD
l0
gTD
20
20
Tot
9
9
8
6
6
5
5
4
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
0

By Barry Sollenberger
Daily Sports Editor
MINNEAPOLIS - For Michigan
football coach Lloyd Carr, it had
almost become an obsession.
The big play.
Why was it missing? Where had it
gone? Why had Michigan's offense
had such trouble breaking it in the past
two games?
"We're just not breaking any big
plays," Carr would say at every press
conference.
Indeed, the Wolverines seemed des-
tined to live by the three-yard run and
the seven-yard pass for the rest of the
season.
But in the past, many teams have
healed their wounds against
Minnesota, and Saturday night,
Michigan did the same. The Golden
Gophers gave up exactly what Carr
and the Wolverines had been starving
for.
Big play after big play after big play.
"You just cannot give up those big
plays," Minnesota coach Jim Wacker,
said. "It's that simple."
Simple or not, Minnesota gave them
up to the Wolverines - seven plays
for over 20 yards, to be exact.
Michigan's rushing attack was espe-
cially impressive. The Wolverines
rolled up 252 yards rushing on 39 car-
ries, an average of almost 6.5 yards per
attempt.
In their past two games, Michigan
running backs Clarence Williams and
Chris Howard had not broken a run for
more than 11 yards. Against

Minnesota, the two backs combined
for three carries over that mark and
had two more runs that equalled 11
yards.
Late in the first quarter, Howard
took a handoff from Dreisbach at the
Michigan 14-yard line, broke a couple
of tackles, and didn't slow down until
he had reached Minnesota's end zone
86 yards later.
"The coaches stressed that that was
our goal," Howard said. "I just didn't
know that I was going to break it. I just
didn't know it was going to be 86
yards."
The run tied for the fifth longest in
Michigan history and was the
Wolverines' longest since the 1993
Rose Bowl when Tyrone Wheatley ran
88 yards against Washington.
"(Howard's) run is the one that
broke our backs," Wacker said. "That
was the big one."
After that, Michigan's running game
was far from finished.
Leading 14-7 early in the second
quarter, Michigan had the ball first-
and-10 at the Minnesota 26.
Williams took a handoff from
Dreisbach and beat the entire
Minnesota defense to the sideline. He
then scooted down the sideline for the
touchdown, and the murder of the
Gophers had begun.
"(Minnesota's) overcommitted
defense allowed us to make some big
plays," Carr said. "When you get eight
or nine men on the line of scrimmage,
it gives you a chance to break a big
one."

You just
cannot gh11+u
those big Oly,
WtO that *nple"
-Jim Wacker
x , Minnesota coach
Quarterback Scott!t Dreisbach and
the rest of the Michigpn passing attack
also god into the act.x Dreisbach com-
pleted 8-of-Il I passe for 184 yards
and a tquchdownl. He; and his receivers
had their way with th eMinesota sec-
ondary, connecting on four plays that
covered more than 210 yards.
And they set the =too~ early against
the Gophers.
On the Wolverii~ts' second posses-
sion, Dreisbach hit Mark Campbell; for
27 yards to the I4innesota 38. One
play later, Dreisbach found a wide-
open Tai Streets 36 yards down field
for a touchdown.
Later, on, Dreieach. hooked pup with
tight eno1 Jerame Tuman on a coupile of
plays th~at totaled .33 and 63 yard,
respectively.
Even backups quarterback Brian
Griese -)lad soW.e big-play fun. On
Michigap's finEO possession;. he threw
40 yards~to Maus Knight for a touch-
down. The reception was, Knight's,
first-ever touchdiown..
i

DEFENSE
Player Solo A
Ray 7
Irons 5
Bowens 6
Hankins 5
Copenhaver 3
Sword 3
Woodson 5
Carr 3
Hendricks 3
Taylor 1
Feazel 2
Steele 1
Hall 1
Huff 1
Blackwell 1
Swett 0
Gold 1
PASS DEFENSE
Player Int Yq
Hankins 1
Totals 1.
Team Stats Mich
First. Downs 18
Rushes/Yards 39/252
PassingsYards 237
Offensive Plays 54
Total Offense 489
Return Yards 38
;comp/Att/Int 11/15/C
Punts/Avg 3/42.7
Fumbles/ Lost 0/0
"Penalties/Yards 6/35
Time of Pass 26:25

sst
2
4
2
1
3
2
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

From left to right William Carr, David Bowens and Glen Steele walk over a downed 4

i

Yd
2:
2:

IsLg
1. 21
1 21
Minn
23
38/76
283
75
359
0

TD
0
0

BROWN JUG
Continued from Page 16
The Wolverines took over, and on
the first play following the missed
field goal, Dreisbach rolled to his right
and hit a wide-open Jerame Tuman for
63 yards to the Minnesota one. Tuman,
a tight end, had the best receiving day
of his career, catching three passes for
101 yards. On the following play, full-
back John Anes went off left tackle for
a touchdown.
The Gophers, who moments earlier
had a chance to cut the lead to 14 or
even to 10, now trailed, 34-10, with
14:37 to play in the game.
When Woody Hankins picked off an
errant Sauter pass on the next series,
Minnesota fans said bye-bye to their
team.
So did Michigan.
From that point, the Wolverines
rolled to the victory, playing backups
the majority of the fourth quarter.
"Our offense gained confidence,"
Carr said. "We ran the ball well. We
came out relatively healthy, which will
be very important down the stretch:'
After losing to Northwestern and
then struggling against Indiana, the
Wolverines wanted to take the
Gophers out of the game early.
And that's exactly what they did.
After Bailey missed a 38-yard field
goal, Michigan marched 79 yards in

six plays to take a 7-0 lead. Dreisbach
threw a 36-yard strike to wide receiver
Tai Streets for the touchdown to end
the drive.
On their next possession, the
Gophers were forced to punt, and
Michigan needed just one play to make
the score 14-0. On first-and-10 from
the Michigan 14, Howard broke a cou-
ple of tackles and raced 86 yards down
the Minnesota sideline for a touch-
down. The run was the fifth longest in
Michigan history.
In the first quarter alone, the
Wolverines rolled up 173 yards of total
offense and outrushed the Gophers,
110 to five.
Minnesota finally got moving early

in the second quarter, marching, 80
yards in nine Iplays. to cut Michigan's
lead in half, Running back Byron
Evans' four-yard touchdown run
capped a drive that was highlighted by
a 38-yard p4ss play from Sauter to
Greg Nelsos. With 10:12 left until
halftime, thei Wolverines led, 14-7.
On the next possession, Michigan
needed just; 3:15 to increase its lead to
14 again.
Facing a. third-and-seven from his
own 41, EDeisbach caught Minnesota
in a blitz. hIe dumped the ball over the
middle to' human, and Tuman raced 33
yards to the Minnesota 26. On the next
play, runnig back Clarence Williams
got to thW outside and motored 26

yards for a touchdown. With Remy
Hamilton's extra point, Michigan led,
21-7.
On their next possession, the
Wolverines put the game away - for
the most part.
A nine-yard touchdown run by
Howard capped a 46-yard, nine-play
drive. On the carry, Howard broke the
100-yard rushing mark in the first half.
He finished the half with 108 yards on
six carries and two touchdowns.
Hamilton missed the extra point, but
the Wolverines still led, 27-7, at half-
time.

In addition to Howard's numbers,
Williams had 91 yards rushing and
Michigan rolled up 206 yards on the
ground as a team in the first half.
Dreisbach didn't throw the ball much,
but with Howard and Williams bk
ing like cannon fire through the
Minnesota defense, he didn't need to.
Driesbach was 4-of-5 for 101 yards
and a touchdown in the first half.
The Gophers kicked a field goal in
the third quarter, before the
Wolverines took control in the fourth,
and cruised to the victory.

The soryr of thejug
So, how did Mviichgan and Minnesota end uip painfr n f the most recog-
rn~zable trophies in college football?

D 23/37/1
4/30.5
1/0
3/20
33:35

Well, the story begins ail t he way #a-k in 1903, d~
Y'ost's point-a-minute teams. Michigan headed up l~
sure it could trust the Golden Gophers to provide j
Michigan trainer Keene Fitzpatrick~ sent student m-
to buy something to put water in. What Tommy :.
Ion jug that cost 30-cents.
That 1903 game ended in a 6-6 tie, and a rather ra
charged the field when the game ended. Lost in Ott
escape w as the w ater jug. The folowing Mond1y a
Jug, and a note was sent to Ann Arbor "We have y
Jwo teams met again, the Wlverines won tack t~i

fing the days of Fielding. 1
M innesota, but wasn't too
-ticulad{y clean water.
'atger Tommy Roberts~ out
back with w a af ve~gal-o ~n so a c o
frenzy and the hufried
custodian discovered the
rur ttle Brown Jug; come
u tfl .1909, butwhenl the

Upu net ,
Who Michigan State (441 Big Ten; 5-3 overal
Wher.w Mchigan Stadium
When: Nov.. 2, noon (ABC)
Sense: Michigan leads all-time 57-26-5
The ninth-ranked Wolverines face a red-trot Spartan teamr, wich Comes to Ann,
Arbior after heating Wisconsin, 30-13, fast week~end. fast year1 Mk igntat4
Ebelt Michigan, 28-25, behind 318 yards passing from, q rteb T }.y $ns.:
Bank~s is gone this year, but junio~r Todd Schultz opte1$f-5ass
against the Badgers. Michigan Statg is tooking to beat Mchga i#ne cutlv
sasons Wotthe first time since .1367. The pf tans, he cuhe1 y ,):i
Daugherty: beat the woterines t ree straight times, b9 reggi 95

MICHIGAN SCHEDULE
Aug. 31 ILLINOIS W 20-8
Sept. 14 Colorado W 20-13
Sept. 21 BC W 20-14
Sept. 28 UCLA W 38-9
}Oct. 5 Northwestern L 16-17
Oct. 19 INDIANA W 27-20
Oct. 26 Minnesota W 44-10
fNov.2 MICHIGAN STATE Noon
Nov. 9 Purdue 1p.m.
Nov 16 PENNSTATE Noon
'Nov. 23 Ohio State Noon
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
M El ct::-..HoWrd6-rdu...
Seco ganrrer.
Ilih-Howard, ri4U. ru...

ges or late ass
Carr's end of game tactics questioned after 40-yard catch

By Nichalas J. Cotsonika
and "ry Solelnberger
Daily Sports Editors
MINk4EAPOLIS - Lloyd Carr
has been guilty of a lot of things
while being Michigan football coach.
He' las been guilty of being too
conserwtive. He has been guilty of
poor pay calling. And he has often
been g'ilty of not smiling enough.
But in his first two seasons, he has
never been guilty of running up the
score.
Unti now.
In their 44-10 victory over
Minndsota, the Wolverines scored a
late touchdown that was a source of
much debate after the game. With
Michigan comfortably ahead, 37-10,
backup quarterback Brian Griese
threw 40 yards to Marcus Knight for
athmrr-hrinwn wth 10 ScndsI

late in a 23-13 victory at Boston
College.
This made the end to Saturday's
game all of the more surprising.
"I'm sorry that we scored," Carr
said. "But I don't think 44-10 is run-
ning up the score. We have a lot of
guys who haven't played. I feel badly
that we did, but I have an obligation
to my young guys that need to be
rewarded for scrimmaging and prac-
ticing. They need a chance, too."
JUG STREAK: Michigan became the
first team to win the Little Brown Jug
10 consecutive times with its victory
Saturday. The Wolverines also
extended their streak of victories in
the Metrodome, where they are 7-0.
The Jug has been awarded to the
winner of the Michigan-Minnesota
game since 1909, and neither side
likes~ to, laseit.

missed a point-after in the second
quarter.
MILESTONES: With four point-
afters and a field goal, Hamilton t
over fourth place on Michigani's-
time scoring list. He now has 250
points.
Chris Howard's 86-yard touch-
down run was tied for fifth in
Michigan's history. Heisman Trophy-
winner Tom Harmon had the other
86-yard run in 1940.
HOMEBOYS: Jason Kapsner and
Jay Feely had several fans in atten-
dance at Saturday's game. Kapsni
true freshman who was a hig
recruited quarterback out of Eden
Prarie, Minn., had family at the
game. Feely, who was born in
Minnesota, had about 30 fans. in
attendance.
THE~ VICTORY AFTER THE VICTORY**

. ........

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