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October 25, 1996 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-25

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 25, 1996 - 7

SLLINGER
Continued from Page 1
the most modern book by Nabokov?"
asked Bollinger, illustrating that classi-
cal ideas should compliment newer
ones. "(For students) to pick up
Shakespeare and read a few lines and
feel chills in their body - that's some-
thing I think is beyond cost."
ut the cost of University Hospitals
also important to Bollinger.
"You don't want to lose the hospital,"
Bollinger said. "The academic medical
program, with the right kind of leader-
ship, can compete in this market."
Bollinger said the Medical Center
needs to adjust to the competitive med-
ical markets opened by health mainte-
nance organizations, but simultaneous-
ly maintain its academic strength.
Bollinger, a highly regarded First
endment expert, .was confronted
early on about his legal philosophy.
The second question from the regents
yesterday morning came from Baker,
who brought up Bollinger's opposition
to the Bork nomination.
"You went down with 10 other deans
and spoke against his nomination,"
Baker said. "There is a responsibility
that you carry the weight of the institu-
Snwith you."
Wollinger said his opposition to Bork
was based on an essay Bork wrote stat-
ing that political expression was the
only sort of speech protected by the
First Amendment. "1 thought this would
be a serious retrenchment on free
speech;' Bollinger said.
Bollinger said he would not testify in
such a hearing if he becomes University
president.

I

That's not to say I think university
presidents should refrain from participat-
ing in controversial public issues,"
Bollinger said, adding that issues impor-
tant to the future of higher education
would be acceptable areas for discussion.
Newman said Bollinger's opposition
to Bork would not be an obstacle to
picking him for president.
"It gives some pause for concern,"
she said. "I was pleased to hear he
wouldn't do it today."
Regent Laurence Deitch (D-
Bloomfield Hills) said questions about
Bollinger's past testimony were not that
critical.
"People have a record," Deitch said.
"When you take a stand on something
like that, it has a tendency to be contro-
versial"
Students at the afternoon town meet-
ing said they had concerns about
Bollinger's commitment to students.
Scublinsky said Bollinger should
have focused more on students' needs.
"He had less of an emphasis on under-
graduate education than the other two,"
Scublinsky said, referring to presidential
candidates Stanley Chodorow and Carol
Christ. "That would be a strike."
Mike Pniewski, who attended the
meeting on behalf of the Michigan
Student Assembly, said Bollinger
seemed to be vague on financial issues.
"The other two candidates were
much more candid about the budget,"
Pniewski said.
Deitch said Bollinger was articulate
and intelligent.
"I was impressed with the overwhelm-
ing force of his intellect, thebreadth of it,
which really is consistent with a place
like Michigan," Deitch said.

PEROT
Continued from Page 1
cisely the other - time after time after
time."
At a later rally on the steps of the
Alabama state house in Montgomery,.
Dole repeated
criticism of
Clinton and the
Democrats, par-
ticularly for hav-
ing accepted a
$20,000 contri-
bution - later
returned -
from a convicted
drug dealer.
"Is there no Dole
honor in this
administration or in this White
House?!" he demanded.
Wednesday's meeting between
Dole's campaign manager, Scott Reed,
and Perot left other Republican strate-
gists baffled. Linda DiVall, a GOP poll-
ster, called the Dole campaign's deci-
sion to approach Perot "strange"
"I just don't think that Ross Perot is a
significant player in this election? DiVall
said. "It's a curious strategy to me."
"They may artificially pump up
(Perot's) position by treating him seri-
ously," DiVall said.
Meanwhile, as if to accentuate
Dole's difficulties, Clinton campaigned
through the heart of Republican territo-
ry, shadowing Dole through Alabama
- a state where voters usually have a
better chance of seeing a snowstorm
two weeks before Election Day than a
visit from a Democratic presidential
candidate. Until yesterday, in fact,
Clinton as president had never set foot
in Alabama.
But under brilliant fall sunshine,
Clinton attracted about 10,000 people
to a rally at Birmingham Southern
College. The sprawling, enthusiastic
crowd testified to Clinton's brightening
prospects in a state that has voted
Democratic for president only once in
the past 32 years.
"It's such a beautiful day, and the
crowd is so large, maybe Alabama is
going to come along with me,' Clinton
said.

'Cause Oscar Mayer has a way AP'PHOTO
Charity Davis, 7, collects gifts after riding in the Oscar Mayer Weinermobile yesterday. Davis, who lives in Champaign,
Ill., is a finalist in the Oscar Mayer talent search and will fly to Orlando, Fla. to sing in a television commercial.
Partyoffers Socialist solutions

STEINEM
Continued from Page 1.
"We don't quite realize how differ-
ent from that Clinton is. (He supports)
pro-choice, affirmative action and the
family medical leave act;" Steinem
said. "Who supported the increase of
the minimum wage? Clinton did. Not
only did Dole oppose this raise, but he
'posed raising it from $1 to $1.50.
"He has been there that long."

The answer to preserving Clinton's
programs is further activism, Steinem
said.
"You need to find out what the con-
cern is, see what the electoral system
has to do with it, and take this country
back from a small group of folks who
are trying to control it," Steinem said.
"We need to defeat this leadership
of the Republican party, so the central-
ist Republicans can take the party
back."

By Stephanie Powell
Daily Staff Reporter
Instead of chemical reactions, alter-
native reactions to capitalism took over
one room in the Chemistry Building
last night.
David North, the national secretary
for the Socialist Equality Party, spoke
on the problems of today's society and
how it differs from the past in a lecture
titled, "The Rights of Man, Equality
and the Birth of Socialism."
"The difficulty is in the acquisition
of wealth, which rises proportionally to
the needs of the poor" North said.
Socialism is the theory that wealth
should be evenly distributed in society.
North used historical examples to show
what results when there is an uneven
distribution of wealth.
The French Revolution was a war
against the aristocracy and it shows
what happens when wealth is one-sided,
North said.
With Nov 5 fast approaching, North
also said the election process is flawed.
"The election is without issues,
ideas, programs and purpose. The only
beneficiaries are the pollsters, and the
corporations that fund the candidates,"
North said.

The party was upset with the fact that
they were left out of the televised
debate, along with Reform Party candi-
date Ross Perot.
North said no viable argument was
given for the exclusion except that
smaller parties do not have a substantial
chance to win.
"The decision was made before the
debate about how people were going to
vote," North said. "If the public cannot
hear what we have to say, then how do
they know we won't be possible candi-
dates to win?"
In the televised presidential debates,
North said, there was no concrete talk
about social and economical polariza-
tion. Capitalism is the root of the prob-
lem, he said.
"Capitalism drives the working class
into social struggle and shows the
growing division between social class-
es," North said.
North admits that socialism is cur-
rently in crisis. He said he believes that,
to correct the trend, people have to
acknowledge the problem of the social
classes.
"The socialist movement is in crisis,
but it didn't start with the fall of
Communism. That was the culmination

of events," North said. The future looks
better if the reaction process happens
more quickly, he said.
Although many local supporters
came, only one student attended last
night's lecture.
"(North's view) is in pragmatic terms
impossible," said LSA first-year stu-
dent Edward Kim. "He is an angry man
that talks about social stratification and
he has no solution."
SEP is holding its final local rally
before the election at 3 p.m. Sunday at
1275 S. Huron St. for any interested
students. For further information about
the party, call 327-9421.

LATINA
Continued from Page 1.
Recent University graduate Darilis
Garcia spoke about the "New Latina"
giving what she called a "crash course
to self-empowerment."
"Once you have that self-confidence
one can mess with you;'Garcia said.
ell yourself how great and wonderful
and beautiful you are."
Students said the night warmed their
pride of being Latina. "Every day I
learn how much more beautiful it is to

be Latina," said LSA first-year student
Raquel Casariz. "I'm glad to be a part
of such a beautiful culture."
LSA senior Iliana Santiago-Santiago
won the Latina poetry contest for
"Strength of These Curves."
Delta Tau Lambda lauded statistics
Prof. Martha Aliaga as outstanding pro-
fessor and La Voz Mexicana as out-
standing Latino/a organization.
Students said the salute renewed their
love of their backgrounds. "I love my
mom now - I feel like calling her now,"
said LSA sophomore Noemi Cortes.

Keep Ingrid at bat! She has a
winning record as a hard-working
team player, coach and manager
for the past 3 1/2 seasons.

TEACHER, Assistant Preschool Teacher GOOD SEATS; UM football tickets. MSU
needed at The Discovery Center in Ann and PSU. Call 332-1273.
Arbor. Early childhood work experience NEED MULTITUDE of ftbl. tix MSU
preferred. 20 - 30 hrs./wk. Call 663-7496. Please call Bob at 434-1424.
L-08. Pla alrr Bob at 434kA -12 ..,-.

TEACHERS Substitutes with early chil-
dhood work experience are welcome to apply
for preschool & kindergarten Teaching posi-
tions at The Discovery Center, 6637496.
EOE.
LEMARKETERS needed no sales. Our
pany is currently looking to fill part-time
positions in the evening. Earn $8/hr. w/
flexible hrs. Positions available immediately.
For more information call Jason Hill @ 800/
543-3792.
WORK AT HOME
Eam $300-$700+/wk. assembling various
products. CALL: 800/698-9707 ext. 132.
ork is Guaranteed!
child care
0%iME0
BABYSITTER NEEDED, for lovely 3 mo.
old son. Mon., Tue., & Thur. days. Good pay
& stable job opportunity 665-0744.
BABYSITTERHOUSEKEEPER 2 days/
week after 2:30. $7.50/hr. 995-5242.
BABYSTITER WANTED for 2 children, 4
& 7 yrs. Flex. hrs. $6/hr. West side home.
Must have own car, exc. refs. 741-4257.
BEFORE & AFTER SCHOOL care for 7 &
10 yr. olds. Bums Park area. Must have rel.
mits. & refs. Laura 668-4106.

NEED TIX for U of M/MSU football game.
Call Jason at 327-9138.
ROMANTIC ESCAPE - Cozy log cabins,
$54-75 nightly, incl. hot tub, canoes, & more.
Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
SPRING BREAK reps. wanted Acapulco
from $529, Cancun from $429.90, other des-
tinations avail. Call Dan at Regency Travel
665-6122. 209 S. State Street.
SPRING BREAK SPECIAL at Stamos
Travel in Kerrytown 663-4400. U-M desk
663-5500. Contiki & AESU tours special
rate.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE in the U.S. on
Continental $159 or $239. Bring your Con-
tinental voucher & AMEX card. Doris at
Regency Travel, 209 S. State, 665-6122.
WANT TO BUY student ticket for MSU and
Penn. State. Call 517/694-5612 eves.
WANTED: UofM/MSU Tickts. Student and
Non-Student. Call Angie 996-9118.
WORLDWIDE LOW air fares. Reserve
your Christmas space early. Regency Travel
209 S. State St. 665-6122.
HERB DAVID GUITAR Studio 302 E.
Liberty, 665-8001. Repair, repair, repair.
Lessons, lessons. Not just guitar.

HER Judo is...
SELF-Taught?
LEARNING HOW has never been easierl
For a 32 page, well-illustrated primer just
send $3./PPD (cash or money-order) to:
WOMEN'S SELF- DEFENSE INITIATIVE
P.O.Box 800: White Lake. Ml 48387-000
JOIN THE MICHIGAN SKI TEAM: in
Jackson Hole, WY, Jan. 2-8 for only $645 w/
airfare. Call Brad @ 677-2744 for more
information.
THE SOCIALIST EQUALITY PARTY
INVITES STUDENTS TO ITS ELECTION
RALLY
Sunday, October 27, 3:00 p.m.
Ypsilanti Corporate Education Center.
1275 S. Huron St. (adjacent to Marriot
Hotel), I-94 to exit 183.
* For secure jobs at decent pay!'
* For guaranteed health care, education,
housing & retirement benefits!
* For the international unity of all
workers!
* Fora worker's government and social
equality!

ROOMATE WANTED IMMED. to share 2
bdrm apt. Own bdrm. on S. Forest. 998-0358.
YOU DON'T KNOW what "hot" is 'til you
have tried Dave's Insanity Sauce.
Tios Mexican Restaurant - We Deliver!
333 E. Huron, 761-6650.
V -'i~iiiiiiiiiiii~i.a

Mayor Ingrid Sheldon at the plate during the
1996 Council versus media softball game.
Paid for by the Ingrid Sheldon for Mayor Committee
Doug F. Ziesemer, Treasurer, 122 S. Main, Ann Arbor 48104

14

AREGIVER in our home 20-25 hrs./wk.
non-smoker, pet lover, experienced,
references, own transportation required call
Chrissi 665-2358.
DEPENDABLE FEMALE (PREF.) needed
to supervise 9 yr. old daughter. 6:45-9:00
a.m. Mon.-Fri. Car & references req. Exc.
pay. 995-0692.

\t

WHAT'S WRONG
WITH THIS
PICTURE?
You're not in it!
Are you still unsure of how to get home for
Thanksgiving or Winter Break? The
Michigan Daily can help you get home to
see Mom's smiling face. All you have to do
is place an ad in our special Homeward
Bound section to find someone headed your
way. It's cheaper, easier, and more fun
(plus more Earth-friendly) to carpool than to
drive alone or fly.
Here's the deal:
* It's only $10 per ad, to be run November 8
in our special section.
* Ads will be taken October 14.25.
The deadline is October 25 at 4:00 p.m.
* How-to: Call us at 764-0557, stop by our
office on the second floor of 420 Maynard St., or
look for us in the Fishbowl October 21-23.
We take cash, local personal checks, Mastercard,
and Visa.
You'll find a ride
home (and make new
friends) in no time.
Your family will

. tickets &t

EMMM

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION for
ideal candidate. Loving Michigan couple
seek responsible, anonymous young women
for egg donation. Ideal candidate would be
white, approx. 20-28 years old, aprox. 5'2"-
5'10", healthy and intelligent. Prefer athletic,
medium to thin build, with medium to light
hair and fair complexion. If you are inclined
to make dreams come true contact Ms.
Knight at Ann Arbor Reproductive Medicine
Assoc. Clark Rd. Ypsilanti, MI. 313/434-
4766. Donation is for couple "DOPBTY".
ADOPTION-U of M alum & her husband
would like to welcome a newborn into their
loving home. Please call Kitty & Alan at 800/

The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan
announces
TH E TA NN ER L ECTI UR E ON
HMAN VAL UES 19%6-97
Thomas M. Scanlon Jr.
Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity
Harvard University
THE STATUS OF WELL-BEING
Friday, October 25, 4:00 p.m.
Rackham Amphitheater, 915 East Washington Street
5YMPOSTUMSON
THI-IE TAN NER t'ALEC TUIRE
THOMAS M. SCANLON, JR.
PETER HAMMOND
Department of Economics
Stanford University

COME VISIT REEFER CITY
www.reefercity.com
EXPERIENCED CHESS players needed to
work at Michigan's only full-time chess store
and studio. Drop by at Adventures in Chess,
220 S. Main (near Liberty) or call John at
665-0612.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income, or

$AAA! Cancun & Jamaica Spring Break
Specials! 7 Nights Air & hotel From $399!
Prices Increase Soon - Save $150 On Food,
Drinks & Free Parties! 111% Lowest Price
Guarantee! springbreaktravel.com 1-800/

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