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October 24, 1996 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-24

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I

LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 24,1996 - 7A

GM, auto workers resume
national contract talks

DETROIT (AP) - General Motors
Corp. and the United Auto Workers
resumed talks on a national contract
yesterday as Canadian autoworkers
overwhelmingly ratified a pact to end a
three-week strike.
The Canadian Auto Workers held
eight meetings in Ontario and Quebec
to explain the tentative agreement to its
26,300 GM workers. The deal, reached
Tuesday, was approved by 89 percent of
those voting.
The final vote was 12,973 to 1,648.
In Detroit, GM's talks with the
UAW continued, but there was no
word from either side on how close
negotiators were to a settlement.
Analysts expect a deal within days
now that the CAW contract has been
ratified.
"It doesn't seem like there's a lot of
controversy," said Nicholas Lobaccaro
of Bear, Stearns & Co. "It doesn't
sound like there's the threat of a strike
right now."
The UAW and CAW are independent
unions, but have coordinated their strat-
egy in this round of Big Three contract
talks.
While the strike against GM of
Canada Ltd. was over, its effects were
expected to keep rippling through the
North American manufacturing opera-
'ions of the world's largest automaker
for at least another week.
GM said the number of workers in
the United States and Mexico laid off
because of the strike fell slightly yester-
day to 19,159. A total 1,830 parts work-

ers, mostly in Mexico, returned to their
jobs while 1,058 new layoffs occurred
in Mexico, and Mansfield, Ohio, and
Flint.
There were no new slowdowns or
closures of assembly plants, though
third-shift workers at the Lordstown,
Ohio, Pontiac-Chevrolet plant were
told not to return to work tomorrow
from their regular days off of yester-
day and today. A GM source, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity, said
the entire plant may close this week-
end, followed soon by the Buick City
complex in Flint.
Plant slowdowns and last week's clo-
sure of the Cadillac plant in Detroit
resulted from shortages of Canada-
made parts. It could take two or three
weeks for full production to resume as
new parts are shipped from Canada.
GM stockpiled many parts, which
drastically lessened the effect of the
strike south of the Canada border.
Analysts estimate the fourth-quar-
ter cost of the strike will be from
$225 million to $350 million,
depending on how much production
is lost. That compares with the $900
million after-tax cost of the 17-day
UAW strike at two GM brake plants
in Dayton, Ohio, in March, which
virtually shut down GM's North
American production.
Analyst David Healy of Burnham
Securities Inc. said lost production
could total between 65,000 and 100,000
units, but that much of that could be
made up with overtime in the fourth

AJA DEKIEVA COHEN/Daily
Mr. Doodler
Kevin Judge, an Engineering junior, works on prop drawings in the Undergraduate Design Studio in the Frieze Building
yesterday.

lEADERS
Continued from Page 1A
son Kenneth Charles, whom she calls
"K.C." for short.
"Recently he's been saying 'Mommy
practice!'," Darden said.
Her husband, an Eastern Michigan
University business senior, said he also
acts as a "coach" for Darden.
*"I look at her playing very critically
because I know that's how her competi-
tion looks at her" Darden said.
Cheryl Darden said she was proud to
be the first African American in her
position.
"I almost feel like a pioneer in a
sense," Darden said.
Darden said there is a stereotype that
black people do not, or cannot play
' lassical music. She attended high
hool at the Interlochen Arts Academy
in Interlochen, Mich., and recalled that
she often would not get the recognition
for her music that she deserved before

coming to the University.
"(A black classical musician) is not
something that this society wants to
see," Darden said.
David Aderente, facilities coordina-
tor for the School of Music, said there
are currently
four black stu-
dents, three of j alm
whom are
female, among like a plc
the approximate-
ly 150 orchestra sense.
members at the
University.
In high
school, Darden
said her father
encouraged her not to give up in the
face of obstacles such as racism.
"He said, 'What do you have to
lose? You've come this far,"' Darden
said.
Darden also serves as a minority peer
advisor for the School of Music. She
said that even at Michigan, minorities

deal with some ignorance and covert
discrimination.
"Times have changed," Darden said.
"It's not blatant - it's more subtle."
Between caring for her family, her
music, school and work, Darden's
peers admire
her ability to
St feelkeep it togeth-

quarter.
The UAW and GM talked through-
out the CAW strike and reached
agreement on many issues, sources
say. But the UAW held off on the
final push to work out remaining
details while it waited for the strike
to play itself out.
"The UAW and General Motors are
very, very close to signing an agrc&'
ment," said analyst Ronald Glantz of
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. "I expect the
UAW to sign within two weeks withouf
any labor disruptions."
The key issue here, as in Canada, is
outsourcing - farming out parts work
to outside, lower-cost suppliers.
In its recent contracts with Ford
Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp., the
companies agreed to guarantee 95 per-
cent of their current union jobs for the
next three years, with major exceptions
for productivity gains and an economic
downturn.
Analysts expect the UAW and GM.
to agree to the same 95 percent pro-
vision, but with workers at several
major parts plants that GM wants td
sell excluded from GM's base work
force number.
GM already has for sale two Delphi
Automotive Systems plants in
Michigan, in addition to two in Canada.
The CAW agreed not to oppose the sale
of the Ontario plants as part of its set-
tlement.
The CAW is expected to initiate
talks with Ford's Canadian unit on
Monday.
Prof. Rebecca Eisenberg said
Bollinger "was an extremely honorable
dean" who was very concerned about
doing "the right thing."
"He has views about ... discourse
within a community that he tried to live
out in his role as dean," Eisenberg said
noting that Bollinger promoted "open
and respectful exchange."
St. Antoine said Bollinger works
effectively with other people.
"He is a keen, even tough, judge of
people, but he has the sensitivity, even
kindness, to be diplomatic in his deal-
ings with them," St. Antoine said. "Our
alumni, practical lawyers for the most
part, loved him."
He also said Bollinger is open to con-
flicting ideas.
"He was also prepared to modify his
own position when he saw that other
views had merit," St. Antoine said. "Lee
is a very strong person, but not in any
overbearing way."

sneer irn a
- Cheryl Darden
Music senior
Darden said she

er.
"It's a chal-
lenge and I
know she's jug-
gling a lot,"
Kiesler said.
"She works very
hard"
In the future,
wants to teach

music. She said she would advise
black youths the same way she does
her young son, to overcome their
obstacles "by being the best."
"Work twice as hard, be twice as
good and stay encouraged," Darden
said.

SEARCH
Continued from Page IA
speech.
Bork was defeated in his pursuit of a
seat on the high court.
Bollinger testified in 1987 - the
same year he became dean. At the time,
the relative youth of the fair-haired 41-
year-old received attention. Today,
Bollinger is poised to make the jump
from Dartmouth provost to Michigan

president - if the regents think he's up
to the job.
Co-workers at Dartmouth said they
would be sorry to see him leave.
Dartmouth government Prof. Lynn
Mather said Bollinger has worked at
"building bridges across different parts
of the institution."Mather said Bollinger
is "a strong leader" and that she would
be "very, very sorry to see him go."
Many officials at Dartmouth
declined comment on Bollinger's
future at Michigan. One professor
said he did not want to be quoted
because of his strong hopes that
Bollinger will remain at Dartmouth.
But at the Law School, many say
they are prepared to embrace a pos-
sible Bollinger presidency with open
arms.
"I was very happy with Lee
Bollinger as a dean," said Prof Samuel
Gross. He said Bollinger would make a
good University president.

I'TAIL -SEASONAL
CART MANAGER
and sales associates for seasonal gift kiosk in
Briarwood Mall for Nov.- through Dec. Call
Gift Haven 810/641-5447.

child care
EEDED for lovely 3 mo.
., & Thur. days. Good pay

< NEWCG0CLUB
Evey other Thursday
7:20 to 9:20 pm
at the Gpsg Cafe
214 N. roush Ave.
Next meeting October 24

RETAIL SALES
Discount Tire Co., Inc.
ASSISTANT MANAGER TRAINEES
Nation's largest independent tire dealer is
looking for dependable, friendly people with
excellent customer service skills, $25K plus
to start. Excellent benefit package, 401K plan
profit sharing, great career potential if you
ave a smiling face and don't mind a
physically demanding work load. Retail &
management experience a plus. Call 313/
769-2158.

____ -. Z5

BABYSrITER NI
old son. Mon., Tue
& stable job opptr

unt .6-0744

BABYSITTER/HOUSEKEEPER 2 days/
week after 2:30. $7.50/hr. 995-5242.
BABYSITTER WANTED for 2 children, 4
& 7 yrs. Flex. hrs. $6/hr. West side home.
Must have own car, exc. refs. 741-4257.
CAREGIVER in our home 20-25 hrs./wk.
non-smoker, pet lover, experienced
references, own transportation required call
Chrissi 665-2358.

SCOREKEEPERS- Ann Arbor's premiere
sports bar has immediate opening for wait &
floor staff-No experience necessary. For
position in fun atmosphere with flexible
hours submit applications to Eric at 310
Maynard.
SEMEN DONORS NEEDED for an infer-
tility clinic. Male students or grads. 20-40
yrs. old are sought. Donors are paid $60 per
cceptable donation. Write APRL, P.O. Box
4, Ann Arbor, MI 48106.
SERVICE TECHNICIANS WANTED
America's largest independent tire dealer is
looking for dependable, friendly and
motivated people for tire technician
positions. Excellent starting wages and
frequent raises available. Flexible hours to
work around any school schedule. Three Ann
Arbor locations: 971-3400, 769-2158 or 482-
6601.
STUCCHI'S - Briarwood Mall near theater
entrance. Flexible hours. Fun environment.
o' king for hard working & reliable people.
411 761-8436.
STUDENT MANAGERS WANTED to as-
sist operations at Top of the i on sixth floor of
ISR, 426 S. Thompson. Shifts avail. Mon.-
Fri. 7-9 a.m., 3-5 p.m. approximately.
Preference given to students in town for
Winter Break. Call Charles at 764-8512
anytime except 12-1 p.m.
STUDENT WORK
$10.25
Local company must fill 32 positions ASAP.
Full-time/ part-time/ weekends available. Call
971-6122 10-4 p.m.
SHIRT BUZZ sales rep. needed. 10-40
per week, you set schedule. Commission
sales. Inquire at http:www.tshirtbuzz.com or
call Carla 1800/756-7598.
TELEMARKETERS needed no sales. Our
company is currently looking to fill part-time
positions in the evening. Earn $8/hr. w/
flexible hrs. Positions available immediately.
For more information call Jason Hill @ 800/
543-3792.
THE COMMONS CAFE on North Campus
now hiring bussers, servers and cashiers.
Flexible hours, great money. Call Tim at 764-
7535.
NIVERSITY CATERING waitstaff
cWeded. Early mornings a must. Flexible
hours. Great money, full or part-time. Apply
in person at the Pierpont Commons Catering
Office, North Campus, 2101 Bonisteel, be-
tween 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
WORK AT HOME
Earn $300-$700+/wk. assembling various
products. CALL: 800/698-9707 ext. 132.
W1I.le ; .n. tP

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STUDENT TRAVEL (800)95-BREAK!
3 TICKETS FOR FUGEES concert at
EMU, Oct. 26. Face value. Call 665-4605.
GOOD SEATS; UM football tickets. MSU
an4 PSU. Call 332-1273.
NEED MULTITUDE of ftbl. tix MSU
Please call Bob at*434-1424.
NEED TIX for U of M/MSU football game.
Call Jason at 327-9138.
ROMANTIC ESCAPE - Cozy log cabins,
$5475 nightly, incl. hot tub, canoes, & more.
Traverse City. 616/276-9502.
SPRING BREAK reps. wanted Acapulco
from $529, Cancun from $429.90, other des-
tinations avail. Call Dan at Regency Travel
665-6122. 209 S. State Street.
SPRING BREAK SPECIAL at Stamos
Travel in Kerrytown 663-4400. U-M desk
663-5500. Contiki & AESU tours special
rate.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE in the U.S. on
Continental $159 or $239. Bring your Con-
tinental voucher & AMEX card. Doris at
Regency Travel, 209S. State, 665-6122.
WANT TO BUY student ticket for MSU and
Penn. State. Call 517/694-5612 eves.
WANTED UofM vs. Penn St. tix. Call 609/
866-2633.
WANTED: UofM/MSU Tickts. Student and
Non-Student. Call Angie 996-9118.

s rIv YOURSZ O & SAV-
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-NGOND1INOSNA110 BAEAIOATFSE4 ~eThcFSTY
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HERBFssDAVID GNmUITN1BRA AES!LTudiOF302A.
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Repair repair repair. Not just guitar.
xi

MASTERING MEDITATION. A 3 week
study program offered free of charge by the
Sri Chimney Centre. 3131994-7114.
THE SOCIALIST EQUALITY PARTY
INVITES STUDENTS TO ITS ELECTION
RALLY
Sunday, October 27, 3:00 p.m.
Ypsilanti Corporate Education Center.
1275 S. Huron St. (adjacent to Marriot
Hotel), I-94 to exit 183.
* For secure jobs at decent pay!
* For guaranteed health care, education,
housing & retirement benefits!
* For the international unity of all
workers!
* For a worker's government and social
equality!
ROOMATE WANTED IMMED. to share 2
bdrm apt. Own bdrm. on S. Forest. 998-0358.
food & entertai,.
TIOS DELIVERS Ann Arbor's best
Mexican style food. Call 761-6650.
Tios Mexican Restaurant
333 E. Huron.

HEALTH CARE
Continued from Page IA
He has been involved with
University Medical Center budgeting
for 24 years.
"lm just better equipped by experi-
ence to address this matter," he said.
Baker said voters must consider such
experience when casting their ballots
because of the issue's importance.
"(Health care) is the most serious
financial issue facing the University,"
he said. "(Voters) are the ones paying
the bills and the insurance and the ones
that have to bring their loved ones to the
hospitals."
Markus said experience is probably
not a concern for most voters when
choosing regents.
"Votes for regents are usually party-
line votes," he said. "I don't know that
voters think about (the University
Medical Center) very much"
Republican presidential nominee
Bob Dole said
the American M -
health care sys-. h
tem is "the
finest in the
world," and isu
not in danger. e p i
"L i be r a I s
have made address
health care a cri-
sis," said M a r!
Nicholas Kirk,
president of the - Rege
campus College
Republicans.

employed and allowing small busi-;
nesses to join together to buy health
insuran'ce at lower rates.
Dole wants to allow citizens to set up,
tax-free "medical savings accounts."
He also supports medical malpractice
reform.
For families providing long-tern
care, Dole supports a $1,000 deduction
for people housing elderly parents or
other relatives in their homes.
In contrast, Clinton said the health
care industry is in jeopardy and needs
help, citing the fact that 40 million
Americans are without health insurance
as a sign of trouble.
Clinton said that during the past four
years he has learned that changes to the
health care industry need to be gradual
and not sweeping. He said changes
must be made to allow more citizens
better access to health care.
"For working families to succeed in
the new economy, they must be able to
buy health insurance that they do not
lose when they

IS
M 1
nt

change jobs or

COME VISIT REEFER CITY
www.reefercity.com
EXPERIENCED CHESS players needed to
work at Michigan's only full-time chess store
and studio. Drop by at Adventures in Chess,
220 S. Main (near Liberty) or call John at
665-0612.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in public and private sector grants & scholar-
ships is now available. All students are
eligible regardless of grades, income, or
prent's income. Let us help. Call Student
Financial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext.
F559 82.

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION for
ideal candidate. Loving Michigan couple
seek responsible, anonymous young women
for egg donation. Ideal candidate would be
white, approx. 20-28 years old, approx. 5'2"-
5'10", healthy and intelligent. Prefer athletic,
medium to thin build, with medium to light
hair and fair complexion. If you are inclined
to make dreams come true contact Ms.
Knight at Ann Arbor Reroductive Medicine
Assoc. Clark Rd. Ypsilanti, MI. 313/434-
4766. Donation is for couple "DOPBTY".
ADOPTION-U of M alum & her husband
would like to welcome a newbomn into their
loving home. Please call Kitty & Alan at 800/
787-9050 or call Jan collect at 810/548-1588.
PREGNANT?
Young couple seeking to adopt newborn
baby. Lots of love from us and grandparents
is waiting for your baby. Expenses paid. If
you or a friend are choosing adoption, pease

Dole said Republicans are against
government intervention in health care
administration, unlike Democrats. He
said the tax burden of any sort of gov-
ernment take-over of the health care
industry would be disastrous.
Kirk said Clinton tried to increase
government involvement in the
health-care industry before, and
would likely do so again. "Bill
Clinton will try again to take over 14
percent of the American economy,"
he said.
Their opposing ideas on the health-
care industry indicate a basic difference
between himself and Clinton, Dole

when someone in
their family gets
sick," Clinton
said in a state-
to ment. "We must
do more to make
quality health
care available to
every American.?
Clinton said he
t Deane Baker has a strong
(R-Ann Arbor) record in terms of
health care. His
signing of the Kennedy-Kassebaum
Bill, bi-partisan legislation that expand-
ed and created protections for access to
health insurance, is one example. He
said his enacting the Family and
Medical Leave Act, establishing the
Childhood Immunization Initiative and
dramatically increasing funding for
breast cancer and AIDS research also
exemplify his commitment to health
care.
ClintonGore campaign officials said
that like Dole, Clinton wants to
increase the health care tax deduction
for the self-employed and make health
insurance more affordable through vol

WORLDWIDE LOW air fares. Reserve
your Christmas sp le arly. Regency Travel
209 S. State St. 66-62

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