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October 10, 1996 - Image 16

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-10

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68 - The Michigan Daily Weeken Magazine - Thursday, October 10, 1996

9 9

IS5ound and Fury
CLINTON DOLES NO ATTACKS
BY DEAN BAKOPOULOS

The Michigan Daly Weekend 1
[~1Student Focus
Energetic student rides JOIN THE DAILY'S s
for equestrian team at the Student Public

Ahem.
I am about to say a very naughty
word. Please do not let your younger
siblings, children or squeamish
Republicans read on any further.
Liberal.
Liberals. Lalaladeeda - liberals!
A word that the Republican Party
wants you to believe means a cross
between Darth Vader, Josef Stalin and
The-Man-Who-Eats-Babv-Heads.
In Sunday night's debate, Bob Dole
threw out the "epithet" LIBERAL a
dozen times - count 'em. 12 times he

threw the word at President Clinton.
One of the final times he used the word,
Dole said, "I wouldn't want to be called
a liberal either, Mr. President."
Uh, don't worry about it.
But Mr. Dole, be aware that liberals
include Thomas Jefferson, George
Washington, Martin Luther King Jr.,
Patrick Henry, Gloria Steinem and yes,
even Newt Gingrich. (Newt led a "rev-
olution," one based on change. That
makes him a liberal too.) Anyone who
tries to change or better a system is a
liberal. Check the dictionary.

Clinton did not defend himself too
much against the charge of liberalism. He
simply told Dole that the "L" word was a
"Golden Oldie" and that he doesn't
"think that that dog will hunt this year."
Point: Clinton.
Pardon me?
It was clear which candidate was tak-
ing the most pot-shots Sunday night.
Dole won, hands down. Among his state-
ments and implications were the follow-
ing: Clinton "doesn't trust the people, he
trusts the government." The president
was "disrespectful to President Bush in
1992."Clinton has "a selective memory."
Clinton and Saddam Hussein are the
only folks "better off today than they
were four years ago" It went on and on.
Dole took cheap shots. The president let
them slip right over his head, and never
lowered himself to that level.
And why should he have? He's
whomping on Dole in the polls, which
is why he rarely responded with person-
al attacks similar to the ones that Dole
so liberally handed out. Dole's biggest
attack of the night, and it was a fair

A

Ei

question, came when Dole asked
Clinton about presidential pardons.
By question's end, Clinton was able
to twist Dole's words and had the whole
audience laughing when he deadpanned
"No comment,"proof of his wonderful-
ly sleek political skills. But he could
have said something harsher, and I'm
sure he briefly considered it.
What Clinton could have said was
this: "Yes, Mr. Dole, and tell us about
the year you ran as Gerald Ford's run-
ning mate (1976). You know, the Gerald
Ford who pardoned Richard M. Nixon,
a U.S. president who potentially faced
dozens of felony charges?"
Point: Clinton.
All the things he said.
Of course there are other things that
Clinton should have said Sunday night

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L.

When Dole told Clinton to "quit scar-
ing seniors," Clinton should have
replied, "I'm sorry Mr. Dole, are you
frightened of the butt-whipping you'll
get on Nov. 5?"
When Dole talked about his blood
pressure, cholesterol level and weight,
and then added, "But I'm not going to
make health an issue in this election"
Clinton should have said, "But I just
heard you do it. Just now. So I'm going
to make senility an issue. This man does
all the things he says he won't do."
When Dole urged Perot supporters to
"look at the Republican record" and
vote GOP, Clinton should have told
Perot supporters to "look at how Bob
Dole didn't want your candidate up here
on stage with us."
When Dole said, "I like young peo-
ple. I like teachers," Clinton should
have said, "And that's why you
maligned them in your cotvention
speech, attacking the fact that today's
young people 'have never had to strug-
gle,' and bashing the teachers' union."
When Dole talked about hos grateful
he was that the GI Bill paid his way
through college, Clinton should have
said, "So. if we sent alt our young people
off to war, THEN they would deserve
help in financing an education?"
When Dole said that he was going to
cut taxes by 15 percent across the board
and not touch Medicare, Medicaid,
Defense, Social Security or debt inter-
est payments, Clinton should have said,
"Well those elements alone make up 82
percent of the federal budget, so I can
see a $550 billion tax cut. Just quit mak-
ing bridges and roads, shut down the
post office, sell off Rhode Island, buy
lots of Canadian.lottery tickets and
cross our fingers.."
Clinton didn't need to say these
things and he knew it. And Dole contin-
ued to build a reputation as a desperate,
negative and attacking candidate.
And your name is?
Eight times. Eight times Bob Dole
forgot that he was the man called Bob
Dole, dropping the first person pro-
nouns "I" and "me," and referring to
himself in the third person. "Bob
Dole's a war hero. Bob Dole will cut
taxes. Bob Dole wants to go home.
Bob Dole is sucking lemons up here
on national TV. Bob Dole needs help
And Clinton could have said, "That's
realty annoying, Bob Dole. Drop the
third person." But he didn't. As he did
most of the night, Clinton simply shook
Dole's hand and flashed his humble,
goofy smile. I can guess what he was
thinking: "I can't possibly lose to this
guy. There's just no way."
- Liddy Dole is invited to send ove
notes to Dean Bakopoulos via e-mail
at deancfaumich.edu.

By Chris Lumpkin
For the Daily
Like many University students,
Briana Becker has a lot of interests out-
side of her normal studies, but the 20-
year-old LSA junior's activities are not
the everyday type. In addition to work-
ing on an English major and preparing
for law school, Becker spends most of
her leisure time riding and competing
for the University's equestrian team.
Becker, who grew up in Lima,
Ohio, started riding horses when she
was 10, and she has been riding ever
since. "I ride my horse almost every-
day. It is a great way to get off cam-
pus and have my own individual
quiet time, and it is actually very
strenuous exercise."
She became a member of the
equestrian team in her first year and
loves to compete at the horse shows,
although the equestrian team wasn't
why she came to Ann Arbor. The
quality of the University's education
attracted her, as ssell as the fact that
Ann Arbor is a very inexpensive
place to keep a horse. "The team was
something I got involved in after I
learned that there was one," Becker
admitted.
"Not many people know that the
University even has an equestrian
team," she said. "It is a sport that
often gets overlooked. The equestrian
team does not have its own horses and
it is not considered an official varsity
sport. In fact, the team has to pay the
University to use its name."
There are about 50 people who are
on the equestrian team, although that
many never compete in a horse show.
To compete in shows against other
schools, team members must first

compete against each other in a chal-
lenge system. That way, the team
always has its best riders represent-
ing them.
Becker maintains that although the
challenge system is competitive,
once at the show the competition
becomes much more difficult
because the host school provides all
the horses. "You don't ride your own
horse. You draw the horse out of a
hat so the rider doesn't know the
horse and that makes it very diffi-
cult. It's what makes intercollegiate
fair. It's what makes us be able to be
a competitive team when we don't
have any funding from our
University because it's just riding
ability," she said.
When she is not riding for the
University's team, Becker competes on
her own. Most of the shows take place
in the Midwest or Eastern part of the
country and she has traveled as far as
Virgina in order to compete. Often, she
comes away from these shows with first
place ribbons.
Becker is an energetic student who
seems to have a full schedule all the
time. When asked what her plans are
after college, she replied, "I'd like to
continue to compete in horse shows
for as long as I can, but one of my
big goals is getting accepted to law
school." When prodded a bit more
about other goals, she shyly admit-
ted, "I have Olympic aspirations and
if I work hard it just might be possi-
ble." With all Becker's energy and
commitment, it's not only possible
but quite probable.
If you have a nomination for our
Student Focus feature, please e-mail
estavrosiiumich.edu.

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An unidentified man rides In the national Desert Circultcompetition*

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