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October 08, 1996 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-10-08

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 8, 1996

NATION/ ORLD

Court justices back at work, reject appeals case

dhe Washington Post
WASHINGTON - In their first day
back on the bench, the Supreme Court
justices yesterday rejected the appeal of
3 Texas mother who had sued local
school officials for failing to protect her
two eighth-grade daughters from sexual
harassment by boys on the school bus.
-,The justices refused to delve into
mat is fast becoming a troublesome
;gal issue and social controversy: how
Icbool officials should respond when
$tldents are accused of mistreating or
:egually abusing each other. The girls in
.yesterday's case allegedly had endured

nine months of repeated taunts, groping
and grabbing riding the bus to school.
By declining to hear the case, the jus-
tices let stand a lower court ruling that
found schools cannot be held liable for
failing to prevent sexual harassment
under a federal law that prohibits dis-
crimination in education. The Justice
Department had urged the justices to
take the case, brought by Debra
Rowinsky, saying that the ruling from
the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, cov-
ering 'Texas, Louisiana and
Mississippi, conflicts with decisions
by other courts and is contrary to U.S.

Department of Education policy on
sex discrimination.
The order rejecting Rowinsky's
appeal was one of hundreds issued yes-
terday on a variety of cases as the jus-
tices opened their 1996-97 term.
Because the justices last week had
announced what new cases they were
taking from appeals pending over the
summer, the orders issued yesterday
were virtually all rejections of pending
appeals.
Acting in two cases that have been in
the national spotlight, the justices also
spurned appeals by accused

Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski, who
said his case has been tainted by gov-
ernment leaks to the media, and by for-
mer Arkansas Gov. Jim Guy Tucker and
two business associates, who chal-
lenged Whitewater special prosecutor
Kenneth W. Starr's authority to bring
charges against them.
The justices also rejected a constitu-
tional challenge to a federal law that
guarantees access to health clinics per-
forming abortions. The case was
brought by people who were prosecuted
for blocking entrances at a Milwaukee
clinic.

Two scientists awarded Nobel Prize
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -Two scientists who discovered how the immune sys-
tem recognizes infected cells - a finding that could lead to new vaccines and ther-
apies for cancer, diabetes and multiple sclerosis - won the Nobel Prize in meli-
cine yesterday.
Australian Peter Doherty, who is now working in Memphis, Tenn., and Rolf
Zinkernagel of Switzerland will share the $1.12 million prize for their jo
research in the early 1970s at the John Curtin School of Medical Research
Canberra, Australia.
The work "fundamentally changed our understanding of the development and
normal function of the immune system," said the citation from Sweden's
Karolinska Institute, whose Nobel Assembly decides the prize vwinners.
Doherty, 55, works at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis.
Zinkernagel, 52, heads the Institute of Experimental Immunology in Zurich,
Switzerland.
They discovered how the immune system recognize cells that must be eliminat-
ed because they have been infected by a virus. In mice, they showed these cells
were doomed because they displayed a combination of two things: a tiny piece of
virus protein plus a chemical label that identified the cells as belonging to 4he

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MSA
Continued from Page :
NWROC presented MSA's resolutions
before the City Council.
"We think these charges are a way
for the city to cover its political butt,"
Curtin said.
Ann Arbor Mayor Ingrid Sheldon
said the City Council values the views
of MSA and that the assembly's
request will be taken into considera-
tion.
"1 At.. oU

group's controversial and extremist
nature.
"I don't think the assembly should
be getting into bed with NWROC -
they are a militant group committed to
smashing fascism at all cost," said
LSA Rep. Jonathan Winick.
But those who were involved in the
protest said the city's alleged violation
of First Amendment rights went
beyond NWROC.
"This is not NWROC's problem,

this is our problem,"

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Dec. GRE Psychology Subject Exam

concerned
about students'
issues especial-
ly when dealing
with MSA
because it is the
most important
representation
of student lead-
e r s h i p ,"
Sheldon said.
She said the
resolution "will
be part of the
equation of our
decision-mak-
ing process."
However,
Sheldon defended

I1 don't think the
assembly should be
getting into bed
with NWROC -
they are a militant
group committed to
smashing fascism
at all cost. "
- Jonathan Winick
LSA representative

said Russell
Stewart,
who was
charged
with two
counts of
felonious
assault
and one
count of
resisting
arrest for
his partic-
ipation in
the anti-
Klan rally.
"I don't
agree with
every -
t h i n g
NWROC

mouse.
Clinton restricts sale
of home drug tests
WASHINGTON - The Clinton
administration, already stung by
Republican charges of complacency in
the face of rising drug use, has come
under a fresh round of fire for restricting
the sale of home drug tests designed for
parents to administer to their children.
While GOP presidential candidate
Bob Dole has lodged most of the drug
policy criticism so far, the latest salvoes
are coming from Republican lawmak-
ers who accuse the Food and Drug
Administration of denying parents a
potent weapon for fighting drug abuse
in the home.
Led by House Commerce Committee
Chairman Thomas Bliley (R-Va.), the
Republicans cite the FDA's actions as a
prime example of what they character-
ize as a heavy-handed approach to reg-
ulating in an area where they believe
parents' rights should be paramount.
At issue is whether "Parent's Alert, a
home drug test marketed by a one-
woman company in Marietta, Ga.,
should be commercially available with-

the decision of

City Attorney Abigail Elais, who
decided to send the bill.
"I do not condone precipitating vio-
lence or preparing for violence,"
Sheldon said. "While I will admit that
there were many protestors at the rally,
some groups came with other ideas in
mind besides peaceful protest - that
should not have happened."
At tonight's meeting, the assembly
will vote on whether to support a third
NWROC-sponsored resolution, which
will condemn the city for charging
eight protesters with a variety of
offenses relating to the KKK protest.
Some members said MSA's recent
support of NWROC was setting a dan-
gerous precedent because of the

says or does, but this issue goes
beyond their group and what it stands
for," Russell said.
If convicted on all counts, Stewart
could face up to four years in prison.
LSA Rep. Dan Serota said the
assembly was right to support
NWROC in its first two resolutions,
but the group should not count on
the assembly to get involved in the
legality of those charged in connec-
tion with the protest against KKK's
rally.
"I think it's important MSA support
the rights to free speech for students at
this university," Serota said. "But I'd
be very concerned about us delving
into the realm of legal cases which are
out of our jurisdiction."

out undergoing a lengthy FDA approval
process.
The test kit consists of a widely used,
FDA-approved urine collection cup, an
envelope for mailing it to a government-
approved laboratory, and a pamphlet
explaining the meaning of the lab resuis.
Rare AIDS strain
uncovered in U.S.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists
are discovering the AIDS epidemic is
far more diverse in America than previ-
ously thought.
Last month, scientists uncovered 'a
second U.S. resident infected with this
rare type of HIV, named Group 0.
Researchers said they also are investi-
gating a small cluster of New Yorkers
with signs of still different AIDS strains
never before seen in this country.
AIDS symptoms appear similar
worldwide even though the HIV virus
is genetically different from country to
country. The concern is whether
they'll also catch any rare foreign
strains.
medics hauled off the wounded on
foam mattresses. Some of the people
injured in the second blast included
medical staff attending to the victim of
the first.
The army said 21 of the injured M
soldiers and 10 were civilians.
Netanyahu pledges
to tacle issues
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yeser-
day looked ahead, past the present; bit-
ter dispute over when Israel will w
draw its troops from the West B-
town of Hebron and said he is ready to
tackle the toughest issues that have
kept Israel and the Palestinains from
peace.
But Netanyahu's remarks to Israeli
lawmakers, which came -as the
Palestinians and Israelis opened formal
talks on Hebron, drew scathing criti-
cism from former Prime Minsti
Shimon Peres and skepticism fror
Palestinian officials and analysts.*
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

Bombs explode at
British headquarters
LISBURN, Northern Ireland -
Bombers struck at the center of Northern
Ireland's security yesterday, detonating
two car bombs inside the British army's
heavily defended headquarters and rais-
ing fears the province could again
become a battleground between the IRA
and pro-British paramilitaries. Thirty-
one people were wounded.
There was no claim of responsibility.
Whether the attack was carried out by
the Irish Republican Army or by anoth-
er anti-British group might determine
whether the province's pro-British para-
militaries call off their own cease-fire
- and send Northern Ireland back into
retaliatory violence.
The first bomb went off without warn-
ing in a parking lot inside Thiepval
Barracks, the main camp for the 18,000
army troops in the British-ruled province.
A second detonated 20 minutes later
near the base's hospital, apparently to
ambush passing soldiers, medical staff
and people wounded by the first bomb.
As flames and black smoke billowed
from the blast site, soldiers and para-

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