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September 25, 1996 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-09-25

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10 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 25, 1996

STICKERS
Continued from Page 9
including two game-winning scores. It
was the first three-goal game of
Flachs' career and the first of the sea-
son for the Wolverines.
SENIOR SURGE: Senior attacker
Michelle Smulders has unleashed 15
shots in five games, scoring a game-
winning goal and an-assist. She is third
on the team in scoring and has started
all five games this season.
Along with fellow senior co-cap-
tains Bree Derr, Meredith Franden and
Selina Harris, Smulders provides lead-
ership and maturity to the team,
Pankratz said.
"(The seniors) have shown a lot of
character this season," Pankratz said.
"They have been willing to work and
willing to learn.
"They've been like sponges, soak-
ing it all up."
Franden and Derr are tied for the
team lead in scoring, with four points
each.
HOCKEY HELBERS: Goalkeeper
Amy Helber is keeping the hockey tra-
dition at Michigan alive for her family.
Helber's brothers Mike and Tim both
played ice hockey for the Wolverines.
Amy, a junior, benefits from the
addition of U.S. Olympian Peggy
Storrar as an assistant coach. Storrar
was a goalie for the U.S. field hockey
team, which also included Pankratz
and fellow assistant coach Tracey
Fuchs.
"(Having Storrar on staff) is great
for Amy and Katie (Oaks)," Pankratz
said. "It'is kind of like having a mentor
or a personal coach."

CCHA
Continued from Page 9
ences allowed unranked teams to steal
the Falcons' invitation.
Last year's regular-season co-cham-
pion, Lake Superior, will not look very
familiar to anyone who saw it last year.
The Lakers not only lost their four top
scorers and their goalie, but they also
lost their coach.
Scott Borek takes over the hot seat
this year from former coach Jeff
Jackson, who left to coach USA Hockey.
"All of that change brings a real
sense of energy, and that's exciting,"
Borek said.
The U.S. World Cup Hockey cham-
pionship was hailed as a victory for
college hockey because of the number

of college products on the national
hockey squad.
"Thirty-five years ago, they told me
you'd never be a pro if you went to
school,' said Berenson, who rooted for
the U.S. team over his native Canadian
team because of its college hockey
influence. "Times have changed."
Since Morrison put the finishing
touches on last season, it was fitting
for him to be at Joe Louis Arena yes-
terday to help usher in the new year.
He has been encouraged by his team-
mates' attitudes - or the lack of them.
"It doesn't look like anyone is still
living off of last season," Morrison
said. "We realize that's done."
The Michigan captain said the team
also realizes that there will be added
pressure on them every night as the
defending national champions.

"Everyone understands teams are
going to be gunning for us more this
year," Morrison said. "I think it will
be good for our team, (keeping) us on
our toes and ready."
Meanwhile, Alaska-Fairbanks is
still gunning to become more compet-
itive with the rest of the conference.
The Nanooks finished tied for ninth
place in their inaugural year with
CCHA last year.
Alaska-Fairbanks coach Dave
Laurion provided one of the more
humorous notes of the day when he
described his team's need to get big-
ger and stronger.
"It's hard to tell a guy that's 5-10,
175 pounds, 'Don't get outmuscled in
front of the net by (Michigan's 6-foot-
4, 209-pound) Jason Botterill,"' he
said.

Women's rugby,
whips itseWf K'zoo
in 57-0 blowout

Spartans reeling after loss to Louisville

By Josh Kleinbaum
For the Daily
The Michigan women's rugby team's
game against Kalamazoo College on
Saturday was close.
For about five minutes.
Then the Wolverines woke up and
routed a short-handed Kalamazoo
squad, 57-0, at Mitchell Field.
When the Hornets arrived in Ann
Arbor on Saturday morning, they had
only six players with them, nine short
of the usual 15-player team. So
Michigan coach Erica Melnykowycz
had six Wolverines put on Hornets uni-
forms to play for Kalamazoo. The play-
ing rosters were lowered to 12 people in
a match that seemed more like a scrim-
mage than an official game.
"They just split us up and said,
'These people go over here, and these
people go over here,"' said Michigan
freshman back Sarah Alvers, who
played on the Kalamazoo team. "There
was no order to it at all.
"None of us played with the level of
intensity that we would have if we had
played against another team, because
we didn't want to hurt our own team. It
was fun, but it wasn't as rough as it usu-
ally is."
Scrum half Lorien Wenger pointed
out that the Michigan players are much
better than the Hornets.
"If they had all of their own players,"
Wenger said, "we probably would have
killed them by more."
For the first five minutes of play, the
Hornets controlled the ball, keeping it
in the offensive half of the field.
Kalamazoo almost scored early on,
when one of its players broke down the
sideline and beat most of the
Wolverines, but Amy Copeland tack-
led her on the 10-yard line to save the
try.
On the next Michigan drive,
Kimberly Lee broke free and streaked
down the sideline before being tackled
at the five-yard line.
The Wolverines won the ensuing
scrum and punched it in for a try to take
a 5-0 lead. Flannery Cambell connect-
ed on the conversion to give the
Wolverines a 7-0 lead.
That optned the floodgates.
Michigan began to play as if there was-
n't even a Kalamazoo defense on the

1If they had all
their players, we
would have killed
them by more.
- Lorien Wenger
Michigan rugby player
field. The Wolverines scored eight tries,
including two from both Copeland and
Lee. Cambell completed four-pf-eight
conversion attempts.
"There weren't any standout players
in this game," Wenger said. "We all
played really well as a team. Even
though it seemed really disorganized,
we played really hard and kept our con-
centration on what we needed to do an1
did it."
Kalamazoo was not able to do the
same.
"The teamwork was not there,"
Alvers said. "When you play with your
team, you know how the other people
play, how the other people run, how
they pass and the kind of game they
play. It's difficult to play with someone
when you first meet them and you don't
know what they're going to do"
Despite the romp, some Wolverinn
felt that they hadn't played as well as
they could have.
"We tend to go down to our oppo-
nents' level," Wenger said.
"When we play better teams, we play
a lot better and look a lot tougher. Also,
we have a lot of new players that
haven't played in a game before, and
they're still learning the game and the
teamwork."
Michigan will compete in t1
National Qualifiers on Oct. 19-20.
They will play against eight to 10 teams
from the Midwest Region, two of which
will move on o the national tournament.
"If we keep working hard the way
we've been doing, we expect to be one
of the two teams to go to nationals,"
Wenger said.
The Wolverines increased their
record to 3-1, having lost only to
Chicago. Their next match is
Mitchell Field this Saturday agains
Columbus at noon.

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EAST LANSING (AP) -
Michigan State football coach Nick
Saban said Monday that he's still
waiting for his team to step up to the
line and do what it has to do to win.
"We don't react very well to adver-
sity," Saban said during his weekly
news conference. "It's a mentality....
It's something they have to be
taught."
Fresh off a 30-20 loss to Louisville,
Michigan State (1-2) faces Eastern
Michigan (1-3) this Saturday at home
It will be the fourth time the two
teams have met on the football field,
but the first time this century.
Michigan State won the previous
three games.
Saban said whether his team learns
any lessons from Louisville will have
more to do with Saturday's outcome
than how well the Eagles do against
the Spartans.
"We did not get the results we
wanted in the (Louisville) game. How

we handle the results that we got will
say a lot about how the rest of our sea-
son will go," he said.
Saban had said before the
Louisville game that his team was not
doing well in practice after having a
bye week following their 55-14
pounding by Nebraska.
That showed at game time, he said.
"Our best drive on offense was the
first drive. Our best half on defense
was the first half," he said.
"Our level of play went down as
the game progressed, and we still had
a chance to win that game up until the
last play of the game."
Saban has complained before that
his team gets discouraged too easily.
But it had seemed that last week's
announcement of relatively light
sanctions imposed by the NCAA
against Michigan State's football pro-
gram might have given the team some
energy.
Instead, Saban said he's still wait-

ing for the players to take ownership
of the team and set a standard they
can hit consistently.
"We've done it in spurts," he said.
"There are a lot of guys who try to do
what we want.
"(But) when you hold a team to
100 yards in the first half and then
give up 300 yards in the second half,
you aren't performing up to your abil-
ity for 60 minutes."
On another topic, Saban said he
spoke Monday morning with
Michigan State running back Sedrick
Irvin, who had sounded homesick and
unhappy with his decision to come to
East Lansing in some media inter-
views.
Saban said neither Irvin nor his
mother said the highly recruited play-
er was thinking of leaving Michigan
State.
Saban and the Spartans travel to
Ann Arbor Nov. 2 to face the
Wolverines.

"(Daily Sports.) Read it. Know it. Live it." - Judge Reinhold

II

IT'S TIME TO...
- CHOOSE FRIENDSHIP
- CHOOSE LEADERSHIP
- GET INVOLVED IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
- GET INVOLVED THROUGH COMMUNITY SERVICE
- MAKE THE BEST DECISION OF YOUR COLLEGE LIFE

... GO

GREEK

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL PRESENTS...
FALL

Alpha Delta Phi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Tau Omega
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Sigma Phi
Delta Tau Delta
Delta Upsilon
Kappa Sigma
Phi Delta Theta
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Sigma Kappa
Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Lambda Phi
Psi Upsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Chi
Sigma Nu

556 S. State
1620 Cambridge
920 Baldwin
1415 Cambridge
604 S. State
1530 Washtenaw
1705 Hill
1004 Olivia
1501 Washtenaw
1928 Geddes
1331 Hill
806 Hill
1437 Washtenaw
707 Oxford
800 Oxford
1043 Baldwin
1601 Washtenaw
-
903 Lincoln
530 S. State
1000 Hill
1408 Washtenaw
548 S. State
700 Oxford

761-8282
761-6503
930-1677
213-3527
213-0020
761-5020
761-6442
668-8998
213-0041
761-3123
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213-0188
761-5950
665-5465
662-0385
213-7453
769-5529
663-9028
761-1055
741-0358
668-6556
761-3127

4

4

RUSH

'96

E

Mass Meeting:
Thursday Sept.
Week One:

26

6pm-10pm(Union Ballroom)

SUNDAY- Sept.

29

Sept. 30- Oct.

3

4pm-lOpm (at Chapter Houses)
6pm-lOpm (at Chapter Houses)

N

Week Two:

I

I

I I - - . - - , , - -

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