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September 23, 1996 - Image 15

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-09-23

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The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - September 23, 1996 - 7B

.olleyball falls short to
Irish, splatters Eastern

Ry .3. SerapIglia
For the Daily
Up two sets to one at Cliff Keen Arena
Friday night, the Michigan volleyball
feam was just three points away from
*psetting the No. 12 team in the nation.
fut the Wolverines failed to deliver the
knockout blow, giving the Irish consecu-
tive victory No. 51 against unranked
opponents..
Michigan lost to Notre Dame, 15-10,
;8-15, 5-15, 15-12, 15-10, because it
.could not put the Irish away.
'We were really taking care of the
htch,' Michigan coach Greg
(iovanazzi said. "The end of game four
id the start of game five is what cost us
e atch."
ZThe Wolverines' poor play at that
juncture spoiled what was otherwise a
'flawless match. They stunned the Irish
With their defense, and confused them
with their tremendous outside hitting.
sophomores Karen Chase and Linsey
Ebert and junior Sarah Jackson piled up
cills, but it was the play of outside hitter
Colleen Miniuk that was especially
#ipressive.
Coming off the bench, Miniuk regis-
tered team highs of 24 kills and 23 digs
as Michigan took sets two and three.
..After racing out to an early 8-3 lead in
set four, the Michigan attack seemed to
let up, allowing the Irish to crawl back
into the match.
This flat period ultimately turned out
to be.the deciding factor in the game.
Tied at 12 in the fourth set, the
,-olverines would not score another
quint as the Irish came from behind to
take the set. Michigan was tentative at
the start of game five and quickly fell
behind 7-2. It was a deficit they could
tot be overcome.

Despite the loss, the Wolverines
showed continued improvement.
"It's there," junior Linnea Mendoza
said. "We dominated this game if you
look at all the numbers. On paper we
won."'
And win is exactly what Michigan did
the following night. Playing an Eastern
Michigan squad that was 6-4 but largely
untested, the Wolverines simply pum-
meled the Eagles. They allowed no side
outs in the first set as outside hitter
Jeanine Szczesniak served all 15 points,
including two aces, in their 15-0 victory.
The Wolverines would go on to clobber
Eastern in the next two matches, 15-3
and 15-9.
"Last night's finish (against Notre
Dame) dictated how we played tonight.
We allowed no let-up," Giovanazzi said.
"Our serving game was exceptional and
we showed a lot of character and intensi-
ty,"
The Wolverines emerged from their
last non-conference weekend with a split
and find themselves a game under the
.500 mark at 5-6 overall. But the
mediocre record does not have the team
down.
"I think we're good enough to go and
win the conference. It's just a matter of
whether we will."
The Wolverines'road to a Big Ten title
starts away from home next weekend,
when they take on Iowa and Illinois. If
the Wolverines are to win the Big Ten,
they will have to keep up the level of
play that characterized this weekend's
play, and they must learn how to knock
off a top-ranked team.
"We really need a win in (a game
against a top-ranked team)," Giovanazzi
said. "If this team gets that win, they'll
realize how good they really are.'

PARADISE
Continued from Page 3B
-ed his side of the story.
"I'm taken care of very well by Ron
and our trainers and everything,"
Sullivan said. "It just got to the point
where I was really fed up with it and
needed to just voice my own opinion."
Sullivan is not the first Canadian ath-
lete to be criticized for leaving Canada
to go to school in the United States. In
sports, many Canadians have an inferi-
ority complex when it comes to com-
peting with America.

"The Canadians have been saying for
years that the U.S. takes some of their
athletes and ruins them and abuses
them," Warhurst said. "Well, that's sour
grapes from a lot of the Canadian
coaches.'
Kevin Sullivan is a senior at
Michigan. He is proud to compete on
American soil. He is proud to run for
the Wolverines. But most of all - like
all long-distance runners - he runs for
himself.
He doesn't owe anybody anything.
- Barry Sollenberger can be reached
over e-mail atjsol@umich.edu.

U U

JOE WESTRATE/Daity
Junior Sarah Jackson and the Michigan volleyball team lost a close match to No.
12 Notre Dame on Friday but rebounded to destroy Eastern Michigan on Saturday.

Sponsored by:
Andersen Consulting M idwest
Arthur AndersenM dw s
Hewitt Associates
Leo Burnett Company November 22. 1996

momm . mxo

Inconsistent 'M' women golfers place ninth

Nancy Berger
Daily Sports Writer
When most sports fans think of
Indiana, they think of basketball, Bobby
Knight or maybe even the movie
"Hoosiers".
'To those fans that are acquainted with
the collegiate golf community, Indiana
sparks different thoughts.
Thoughts of excellent golf.
At last weekend's Lady Northern
*nvitational at East Lansing, the
Hoosiers ran all over the Big Ten as well
as Missouri, Iowa State, Illinois and
Northern Illinois by shooting a 50-over
par 914 for the 54-hole tournament.
Indiana outshot its nearest opponent,
Ohio State, by 15 strokes. Ohio State
was led by Amy Langhals, who finished
first individually with a seven-over par
223.

While the Big Ten teams took the first
11 places, Michigan managed to finish
in ninth place, with a 95-over par 959.
Despite their low finish, the Wolverines
said the competition was close between
the rest of the conference.
"From third to ninth place, the compe-
tition was tight;" sophomore Sharon
Park said. "We were just eight or 10
shots away after the second round"
According to coach Kathy Teichert,
the outcome of this weekend's tourna-
ment can be deceiving when you size up
the conference.
"There is a lot of parity in the Big Ten.
It is a lot closer than you think," Teichert
said. "If you start playing well and get
the ball rolling quicker, then things will
start to happen."
In the first round, Michigan averaged
80 strokes as a team and then improved

to a 77.75 average on the second day.
The team ballooned to an 82 average
yesterday.
Teichert cited Michigan's erratic
scores as a factor in the outcome of the
tournament.
"We didn't have one person that
shined through," Teichert said. "On the
first day Sharon, Wendy (Westfall) and
Ashley (Williams) played well. On the
second day, Ashley and Wendy did not
play well and on the last day, Sarah
(Lindholm) was the only player under
80."
As a result of the inconsistency in
individual scores, not one Wolverine
finished in the top 20. Park was
Michigan's highest finisher, placing
21st, while Lindholm and senior Molly
Vandenbark placed 39th and 52nd,
respectively.

Inconsistency wasn't the only glaring
mistake which hurt the Wolverines this
past weekend. Teichert pointed to many
of Michigan's difficulties yesterday.
"We had a bad day (yesterday),
Teichert said. "As a team we had sever-
al (double bogeys). We didn't make
enough birdies to make up for the dou-
bles."
For Park, a couple of bad holes in the
third round hurt her overall score.
"If I would have played better (yes-
terday) it would have been different,"
she said. "It was a couple of bad holes
and it shot my confidence.

Partial List of Employers:
Andersen Consulting
Arthur Andersen
Bear, Stearns & Co., Inc.
Central Intelligence Agency
Citibank
Defense Intelligence Agency
Delphi-Saginaw, GMC
Federated Department Stores
Fidelity Investments
First Chicago
General Mills
Hewitt Associates
Leo Burnett
Manor Care, Inc.
Merrill Lynch
Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals
Price Waterhouse
Prudential Securities
Reuters America, Inc.
PLUS MANY MORE !!

Westin O'Hare Hotel
Chicago, IL
TO REGISTER:
Send or fax your one-page resume with
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(617)577-7790 phone
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WHEN & WHERE.

September 24, 7:30pm
y Ann Arbor Theater (II)
WHAT.-
Cardmembers get two compli-
mentary passes to a pre-release
screening of 20th Century Fox's
blockbuster that thing you do.
HOW.
Just bring the American Express*
w Card or Optima* Card and your
student ID to the location listed
below to pick up your passes.
NOW.
If you're not yet a Cardmember
and would like to take part in
our exclusive previews, it's easy
to apply for the Card. Just call
1-800-942-AMEX, ext. 4114.
MORE TO COME.
that thing you do is one in a
series of five major motion pic-

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761-1111
1031 E. Ann St.

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