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September 16, 1996 - Image 14

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-09-16

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6B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, September 16, 1996

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

B.C. mauled at home .
by Virginia Tech, 45-7,

BOSTON (AP) - Nineteenth-
ranked Virginia Tech felt it knew exact-
ly what type of defense it would see.
How right it was.
The Hokies, facing former defensive
coach Phil Elmassian, used a no-huddle
offense to near perfection in the open-
ing quarter, scoring on the first three
possessions en route a 45-7 defeat of
Boston College and a school-record
12th straight victory.
"I guess they run our defense," said
Hokies quarterback Jim Druckenmiller,
who completed 13-of-24 for 214 yards
and two TDs. "No one runs it any better
than we do. We see it every day in prac-
tice."
Elmassian coached the Hokies'
defense in 1993 and '94 before leaving
for Washington. He joined the Eagles
this season.
Brian Edmonds and Shyrone Stith
each had two scoring runs as the Hokies
surpassed their school-record of 11
consecutive victories set from 1917
through 1919. They also extended the

second-longest active winning streak in
the nation, behind two-time defending
champion Nebraska's 26.
"I haven't mentioned it (the winning
streak), and I don't think the players
have mentioned it either," Virginia Tech
coach Frank Beamer said. "We had a.
great win. If we keep it in that frame,
that's what's important."
Virginia Tech (2-0), coming off a surn-
prisingly close 21-18 opening-week,
victory over Akron, built a 35-7 lead
after three quarters.
The Eagles (1-1), who defeated
Virginia Tech, 20-14, last Sept. 7 at
Blacksburg, Va., suffered their large
Big East loss and dropped their fourth
straight home opener.
"All I can say, gentlemen, is I can't
imagine how bad it would have been if-
we hadn't been working at it," Boston
College coach Dan Henning said.-
"Obviously, they're a better football
team than we are. We've got a long way
to go to catch up to a football team like,
Virginia Tech."

HAPPY HOUR
MON-FRI
9:00-11:30 AM
9:30-CLOSE
$4.00

Meet the Michigan defense's next target - Boston College quarterback Matt
Hasselback. Hasselback and the Eagles fell to Virginia Tech, 45-7, on Saturday.

Buffaloes not the only team bitten by upsets
Washington sacks Sarkisian 8 times on way
to upset; Texas A&M shocked by Cajuns

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SEATTLE (AP) - The Washington
Huskies may have a good defense after
all.
Beaten up by Jake Plummer and
Arizona State in a 45-42 loss in the
opener, Washington defenders looked
like an entirely different group against
No. 14 BYU on Saturday.
The Huskies sacked highly regarded
Steve Sarkisian eight times - and even
tackled him in the end zone for a safety
- in a 29-14 victory.
Sarkisian, who threw 10 touchdown
passes in the Cougars' first two games,
had two scoring passes, but was unable
to overcome a Washington defense that
limited the Cougars to 14 net rushing
yards or a mistake-prone offensive line.
"Their defense played extremely
well," BYU tight end Itula Mili said.
"They're not as big as Texas A&M, but
they're a lot faster."
"They kind of out-physicaled us the
whole game," Sarkisian said. "After we
got behind, they knew we had to throw
and it was easy for them to come after
us."
Jason Chorak, who had three sacks,
delivered the final indignity by tackling
Sarkisian in the end zone for a safety
with 1:21 to go. Redshirt freshman nose
tackle Mac Tuiaea had 3 1/2 tackles for
the Huskies.
"Last week, I think we all had first-
game jitters," Chorak said. "The whole
defense is just coming together."
"We really tried to emphasize con-
tainment all week after the way
Plummer ran around on us last week,
Tuiaea said.
"What a difference a week makes,
Washington coach Jim Lambright said.
"We controlled the line of scrimmage."
Washington (1-1) won its 11th con-
secutive home opener before a Husky
Stadium crowd of 71,165 on a day when
Shane Fortney ran for one touchdown

and passed for a score, and Rashaan
Shehee rushed for two touchdowns.
BYU came into the game with nation-
al championship aspirations. The
Cougars, who won their opener at No.
25 Texas A&M, felt a win in Seattle
would have been a springboard to an
unbeaten season.
"This game meant a lot nationally,"
BYU coach LaVell Edwards admitted.
That may have affected the way the
Cougars played.
"I think all the hype got in a lot of
players' heads," middle linebacker Shay
Muirbrook said.
The Huskies' defensive pressure was
too much for BYU's offensive line. The
Cougars (2-I) committed 15 penalties
for losses of 119 yards.
The Huskies rolled up 445 yards, 264
by rushing, to BYU's 293. Sarkisian
completed 23-of-35 passes for 279
yards and two touchdowns, but the
Cougars netted only 14 rushing yards.
Fortney was 16-for-24 for 172 yards
and one touchdown. Shehee rushed 21
times for 131 yards, while backup Corey
Dillon had 82 yards on 10 carries.
Fortney directed the Huskies in all but
two of their offensive series. Brock
Huard, Washington's redshirt freshman
quarterback, played in only two series
after directing the Huskies to three
fourth-quarter touchdowns at Arizona
State last week.
"Coach is going to go with whoever
has the hot hand and that's going to be
that way all year long" Fortney said.
Shehee bounced back after a lacklus-
ter 50-yard rushing day at Arizona State.
He had his fourth career 100-yard rush-
ing game.
"Going into this game, I was so well
prepared I knew I couldn't be stopped,"
said
Shehee said he couldn't prepare prop-
erly for Arizona State because of a ham-
string injury.
Trailing 21-7 at halftime, BYU dom-
inated most of the third quarter, but got
only a career-long 42-yard field goal by
Ethan Pochman with 3:27 gone to show
for it.
Pochman missed a 33-yard field goal
midway through the quarter.
Fortney passed 29 yards to Dave
Janoski for a touchdown with 1:53 left
in the third quarter for a 27-10
Washington lead, capping an 80-yard
drive that broke the Cougars' backs.
In the fourth quarter, Sarkisian
marched BYU 68 yards, running out of
the pocket and finding Mili in the end
zone for a 1-yard touchdown with 6:04
left.

AP PHOTO
Brigham Young's Brian McKenzie attempts to catch a first-half pass in the
Cougars' 29-14 loss to Washington. Brigham Young and Texas A&M were two
ranked teams that fell to unranked opponents this week.

Washington got its 21-7 lead as
Fortney scored his team's third first-half
touchdown on a 1-yard option run with
13 seconds left before halftime. The
Huskies had to go only 46 yards for the
score after a 26-yard punt return by
Jerome Pathon.
The Huskies used a ball-control, 13-
play, 84-yard drive with the opening
kickoff to take a 7-0 lead. Shehee capped
the drive with a 4-yard touchdown run
with 5:07 gone.
Washington made it 14-0 in the sec-
ond quarter when Shehee found lots of
holes in the BYU defense for his 45-
yard scoring run.
Shehee took a pitch left from Fortney,
got outside the Cougars defense and
then got an outstanding block from
Pathon at the BYU 25 that got him into
the end zone.
Sarkisian combined with Kaipo
McGuire for a 32-yard touchdown pass
to cut Washington's lead to 14-7 at 8:22
of the second quarter.
The BYU loss came in Edwards'
300th game as coach.
Washington is 2-1 against BYU and
21-4-1 against Western Athletic
Conference opponents.
SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA 29, No. 25
TEXAs A& M 22
LAFAYETTE, La. - Southwestern
Louisiana managed only one long drive
against No. 25 Texas A&M on Saturday
night. Thanks to the defense, that was all
that was needed.
Britt Jackson had one of two
Southwestern Louisiana interception
returns for touchdowns, a 30-yarder for
the deciding touchdown, and the Ragin'

Cajuns took advantage of eigh*
turnovers in a 29-22 victory over the
Aggies.
"As many turnovers as we had tonight,
I don't think there's a team in college
football we could have beat," Texas
A&M coach R.C. Slocum said.
Damon Mason's interception of
Branndon Stewart's pass at the.
Southwestern 13 with 31 seconds left
finally finished Texas A&M (0-2) an.
touched off a massive celebration. Fans
flooded the field, hugging players and
ripping down a goal post.
Police surrounded the other one;
before fans could tear it down.
It was Southwestern Louisiana's first
victory over a ranked team.
"There's never been anything this
sweet;' Southwestern coach Nelson:
Stokley said. "I've been around a lot of
big wins, but our heart was in this one,.
I've never seen such an effort."
Southwestern (1-1) turned three Texas
A&M turnovers into touchdowns,
including Mason's 46-yard interception:
return and Charles Johnson's 17-yard;
return of a fumble that gave the Ragin't
Cajuns a 14-7 first-quarter lead.
"It seemed like every time we gained
momentum, we turned it over," Stewart
said. "Practically nothing went our way."
In the second quarter, Southwester
went 92 yards on a drive that consume
7:42, going ahead 21-7 on Jake
Delhomme's 1-yard pass to Cody
Romero. The drive included four third-:
down conversions and two fourth-dowry
conversions.
D'Andre Hardeman, whose 1-yard
run gave Texas A&M a brief lead in the
first period, ran 39 yards for his second,
TD to cut A&M's deficit to 21-13 at
halftime.

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