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December 02, 1996 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


' tion
rre
,gures
eemed
warped'
H5\ TFORD, Conn. (AP)
uxorn Xena can be stripped down to
er voluptuours plastic skin, while the
iolejt Freak, with his tattered
lotlis and bagful of weapons, may
nc~lrage kids to fear homeless peo-
ile.
C stmas toys have taken a decid-
dly -nsavory bent, says the Rev.
topher Rose, compiling his
n annual list of warped play-
hin.
Inwhis latest list, published Saturday
n T&e Hartford Courant, he criticizes
roti ally dressed female action fig-
restd
"What is it teaching little boys about
on; n?" asked Rose, rector of Grace
pi opal Church.
Hr notes that the package for Xena
l art of the "Hercules, The
egondary Journeys" toy series, sug-
est: "Remove Xena's Princess war-
iorggutfit." And Tiffany the Amazon
as a removable bra.
"Sie's supposed to be a hero," says
osee. "But why is it you take her
lotAes off?"
But his No. 1 target this season is
"The Freak," a deranged-looking char-
cter who looks too much like an inno-
homeless person.
Vbout 40 percent of the homeless
are nIntally ill," he says.
In 1990, Rose and others got the
Walt Disney Co. to agree to stop selling
"Steve the Tramp," which he consid-
ereda tasteless reflection on the home-
less
That character, one of a series based
on -the movie "Dick Tracy," was
described on the package as "a lout
A would just as soon take your life as
y 'r wallet ... (and) will use and abuse
any young, helpless prey he comes
across."
"Super Size Angela" also appears on
this-year's list: the scantily clad action
figure is described on the package as
"an angel with ulterior motives"
Rose said he fears young boys
may develop their own ulterior
motives.

NATION/WORLD

The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 2, 1996 - 7

FDA to face
challenges with
new Congress

THAN V4EAR FUR

perl,

The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - When David
Kessler steps down as commissioner of
the Food and Drug Administration early
next year, the agency he has headed
since 1990 will be put to the test. Its top
tier of administrators will be left run-
ning the agency while the new nominee
-- not yet named by the Clinton admin-

istration - runs
gauntlet.
But getting a
new commis-
sioner in place
is only one of
the challenges
ahead for the
FDA, which

the confirmation
"They're
critical Jun
right noW

AP PHOTO
Animal rights activists Alex Bury, Lasa Kemmerer, Violet Kelly, Gayle Staker-Wilson and Veronica Ryan march through
downtown Anchorage, Alaska, as part of a protest against wearing animal fur. The protest was sponsored by People for
the Ethical Treatment of Animals and the protesters wore only underpants and slippers in 10-degree weather.
Can a' health-care system
gives patients ahaah

TORONTO (AP) - Doctors are
angry, patients alarmed, politicians per-
plexed. Canada's health-care system has
created a coast-to-coast headache that
no one seems quite sure how to cure.
Launched 30 years ago, the publicly
funded system has long been a source
of pride for Canadians, providing uni-
versal access to generally high-quality
care. But long-simmering problems are
now boiling over simultaneously.
Budget-cutting provincial govern-
ments are closing hospitals and laying
off nurses. Reports of patients dying
due to delayed or slipshod treatment
proliferate. Doctors say more col-
leagues will leave for higher-paying
jobs in the United States.
In Ontario, the largest province,
many doctors have been refusing to see
new patients as they battle with the gov-
ernment over pay and autonomy. In

British Columbia, doctors plan to close
their offices on selected weekdays to
retaliate for a cap on payments.
In Alberta, which three years ago led
the way in slashing health funding, pres-
sure from doctors and patients con-
tributed to the government's decision last
week to restore most of the cut funds.
But that decision comes too late for
some, according to a coalition of
Alberta doctors. They said two patients
died in emergency wards while await-
ing transfer to hospitals that had the
proper personnel to treat them.
There was unprecedented debate
over the health care system in
November. Ontario call-in shows
focused on the doctors' slowdown, the
Canadian Broadcasting Corp. aired a
three-part series on cutbacks, and the
national newsmagazine Maclean's ran a
36-page cover story, "Radical Surgery."

The financing of Canada's health-care
system is complex. It is a combination of
federal cash transfers to the provinces
plus provincial tax revenues collected
under a federally dictated formula.
The provinces are catching the flak
for making cuts, but the Canadian
Medical Association places most of the
blame on the federal government for
reducing its transfer payments by sever-
al billion dollars.
Health Minister David Dingwall says
money must be spent more efficiently
as the percentage of elderly people
rises. He advocates more home care
and more funds spent on prevention,
including an anti-smoking campaign.
One of the most hotly debated ques-
tions is whether Canada will have to
switch to a two-tiered health system in
which patients with enough money
would be allowed to get private care:

regulates a
seemingly end-
less assortment Biotechr
of controversial OrganiZ
products
including drugs, medical devices such
as artificial heart valves and silicone
breast implants, and cosmetics and
blood.
The 105th Congress will consider
reauthorization of one of the more
important pieces of recent legislation
governing the agency: the Prescription
Drug User Fee Act.
That 1992 law created a system of
industry fees that ultimately led to a
streamlining of the historically sluggish
approval process; without reauthoriza-
tion, it will expire in September.
The new Congress is almost cer-
tain to revive the extensive FDA reform
measures that died in the crush of the
104th Congress. The previous bills,
among other things, would have set up
a system to let private companies take
over some of the responsibility for
reviewing new product applications.
The FDA also will have to go
through the annual appropriations bat-
tle - including, for the first time, the
need to secure funds that would enable

C
_lc
nt
,at

the agency to enforce its landmark
tobacco regulations.
The prospect of a search for a new
commissioner and a protracted confir-
mation fight has caused a wave of
apprehension among industry officials
who have watched the agency improve
its performance under Kessler.
"They're at a critical juncture right
now," said Carl Feldbaum, president of
the Biotechnology Industry
Organization. "I
hope the presi
at a dent acts fast" on
nominating a new
ictur FDA head.
C I i n t o n
administration
officials have
arl Feldbaum just begun their
logy Industry search for a suc-
ion president cessor to Kessler,
who announced
his intention to leave last weekend.
Inside candidates for the post include
deputy commissioners Mary
Pendergast, William Schultz and
Michael Friedman, a doctor who has
reportedly earned high marks in negoti-
ations with industry on the user fee
reauthorization. But lawmakers such as
Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) say that no
inside candidate will do, because the
culture of the agency needs to be
changed
Each constituency of the agency
wants to ensure its needs are addressed.
Matthew Myers of the Campaign for
Tobacco-Free Kids, for example,
believes that any nominee for commis-
sioner should share Kessler's commit-
ment to see the tobacco regulations
through. "They can't have come this far
only to back down now. ... The presi-
dent's commitment is too strong," he
said.
But Myers acknowledges that any
such candidate could run afoul of law-
makers who oppose the tobacco rules.

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complete lecture notes. These notes can make 'great supplemental study guides.
Anthro Bio 364 Geo Sc 101 Pol Sci 140
Anthro Cult 385 Geo Sri 111 Pol Sci 395

%

Biostat 503 German 101 Psych 3O -
Chem 210 Hist 218 Psych350

Enn 101

Phvs 19r,

L-L.Wal lux r- al .i

Ecnn 1fl2

Phvs 126

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,s + - ti% -

THE FISH DOCTORS b
quarium sale!
10 gallon tank $7.99
29 gallon tank $25.99
50 gallon tank $39.99
Next to Putt-Putt Golf on
1030.

back to school a-

-

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741-9669 1176S. Stat

Washtenaw 434-

.L

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r. "
r O NpSm.I M" GTSSo w V C S
r IF ER KSON'4P

FIND IT
IN THlE

I'

Work Across Differences
G~ r.ot .~ pr.. pig ~a
:1Y::NTERGR :^:k:{5 rvO:;;U{};};{;",j}{{?:'};;:DIAL }vOGUE~t: :{} ',};:: .

WORLDWIDE LOW air fares. Reserve
your Christmas space early. Regency Travel

|I

Dialogues among different groups:
- People of Color & White People
-- MApAn R. WArmon

g. r .9

ii

q

Amw" - i

!-

11

11

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