100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1996 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 18, 1996

HOSPITAL
Continued from Page 1A
lies in circumstances like those on the panel.
Clinton and the panel discussed the problem of obtaining
insurance with pre-existing conditions, lack of funds for
aging children with chronic conditions, lack of insurance
payment for home care and the rapidly growing number of
uninsured Americans.
Clinton suggested health care reform might include pool-
ing people needing private insurance into large interest
groups, such as a pool of small businessmen.
"That's the idea of the village, that's the idea of insur-
ance," she said.
She also suggested requiring social service recipients to
make sure their children are immunized and receive proper
health care exams.
Panel member and assistant Nursing Prof. Judy Cameron
said the current health care system creates a very fragmented
life for families. Clinton said doctors spend too much time on
the phone arguing about insurance to focus on families.
Cameron said, "It should not be left up to the heroics of a
few individuals. There should be a system in place."
Clinton said she believes children's hospitals to be more
cost-effective than regular health care in the long run, citing
the training of pediatricians and concentrated research as
major benefits. "But we have to pay for something in the
short run," she said.
The young patients presented Clinton with sweatshirts forthe
first family. The children also made a commemorative book.

BOOK TOUR
Continued from Page 1A
member of the College Republicans.
"We're showing Ann Arbor that the young people care
about what happens to our country," he added.
Belleville resident Tony Piskorski also expressed displea-
sure at Clinton's tour stop in Ann Arbor. He said Clinton is
on a tour "to promote a book she didn't even write."
He added the cost of the tour to the taxpayers is expensive.
"That's the question - what it's costing," he said. "To me,
this is ridiculous."
Unfortunately for some, not everyone who waited in line
had the opportunity to meet Clinton.
Ann Arbor resident Genie Lange said she is "very disap-
pointed" at not meeting the first lady.
Clinton left Borders at 3:15 p.m. and walked across East
Liberty to attend a reception in the lobby of the Michigan
Theatre for members of her fan club.
"She has a schedule," said Dallas Moore, community
relations coordinator for Borders. "It wasn't our call."
Supporters clapped and cheered as Clinton crossed the
street. One fan yelled, "We love you!" In response, Clinton
waved and said, "Thank you."
About 150 to 200 fan club members greeted Clinton in the
theater. She stayed for 15 minutes, giving a short speech and
shaking hands.
Borders did not have an estimate last night of how many
people attended the event or how many books were sold.
Clinton's next tour stop is in Chicago.

JONATHAN LURIE/Daily
Protesters choosing to remain anonymous marched with covered faces outside the Statehouse In Lansing.

CAMP TAKAJOl

Residents, U students
protest Engler's speech

for Boys

i

1

Long Lake,
Naples, Maine

Over 100 positions available for heads and assistants in:

Tennis
Baseball
Basketball
Soccer
Lacrosse
Golf
Flag Football
Street Hockey
Roller Hockey
Swimming
Sailing
Canoeing

Waterskiing
SCUBA
Archery
Riflery
Weight Training
Journalism
Photography
ideography
Woodworking
Ceramics
Crafts
Fine Arts

Nature Study
Radio & Electronics
Dramatics
Piano Accompanist
Music Instrumentalist
Backpacking
Rockclimbing
Whitewater Canoeing
Ropes CourseInstructor
General (with youngest boys)
Secretarial
Kitchen

6
JAMAICA FROM
(ANCUN $429
Roo xi sroundpairfaparefrom trottrans-
fers and 7nigt hotal aaxntmcdaaonsbased on
quad occupancy. Taxes are not included.
mouoy Travel , r,
CIEE: Coucd on atetnational Edu catiomal E g.
1220U lVeIsI ,#208
above McDonalds)
998-0200I
ales111 Vgfrthrprn~ra dsIntos

By Stephanie Jo Klein
Daily Staff Reporter
LANSING - As Gov. John Engler
gave his annual State of the State ad-
dress last night, hundreds of state resi-
dents gathered on the Capitol steps in
noisy protest of the politician's poli-
cies.
A banner reading, "Fight poverty,
not the poor!" was stretched across the
front lawn by activists from Ann Arbor,
in full view of all who entered the
building.
Made up of more than 20 unions and
student,community and church groups,
the State of the People Organizing Com-
mittee gathered people from across the
state.
As people in the crowd cheered, Bob
Apter, a member of United Auto Work-
ers Local 6000, called the governor's
policies oppressive and likened Engler's
administration to Nazi Germany.
"Everything that the Nazis did was
legal," he said. "Engler has closed health

June 17th Through August 18th
For Further information - CALL MIKE SHERBUN AT 1-800-250-8252
FAX RESUME TO 616-954-9534
RSUMMER
EMPLOYMSENT
OPPORTUTNITIES
1996 SUMMER CAMPS OF CHAMPIONS
AT TH E
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS
WILL BE HIRING SUMMER CAMP STA FFERS
COORDINATORS
COUNSELORS
OFFICE STAFF
COME FIND OUT ABOUT THE BEST SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY ON CAMPUS
COME JOIN US FOR INFORMATION AND REFRESHMENTS

facilities in the state, pushing people
onto the streets and into cemeteries and
jails.
"Instead of Jews, (Engler) targets
blacks and poor people," Apter as-
serted.
When Yvonne Camal-Canul spoke,
she gave hope through activism. "I came
here last week, fighting for school fund-
ing," she said.
Although funds were not increased,
she said, "they'll never take my voice
away!"
Nora Salas, an LSA junior and public
opinion co-chair of Alianza, said the
rally was intended to raise public aware-
ness.
"Engler is being touted on a national
level as an example of how the states
should run things when state are given
more power by the Republican Con-
gress," Salas said. "I would not want
anyone in the country to get the impres-
sion that everything was all happy for
everyone in Michigan."
Brian Stull, a recent graduate of the
School of Social Work and an organizer
of the rally, said Engler's policies
troubled him.
"The number of penal institutions in
this state have quadrupled since he's
been in office," he said. "Meanwhile,
the number of educational institutions
has remained constant."
The protest, which started at 6 p.m.,
spilled over into the streets as people
marched around the Capitol with signs
held high.

ENGLER .
Continued from Page 1A
Schroer said the partisan rhetoricw*
indicative of the fact that Engler may
seek the Republican vice presidential
nomination. She said Engler's plan to
give environmentally friendly compa-
nies special privileges was made little
sense: "Are you going to give a com-
pany a permit to build in a wetland
because it has a clean slate?"
Sen. Alma Wheeler*Smith (D-Salein
Township), who gave the Democratic
response along with three other lawm*
ers, said she was concerned with Engler's
focus on building prisons.
"He's afraid to bring (higher educa-
tion) up," she said. "Soon, correctional
funds will exceed money for universi-
ties."
Several members of the University's
College Democrats accompanied Brater
to the Capitol.
Jae-Jae Spoon, an LSA junior, said
she heard Dr. Joycelyn Elders speak'O
Monday about the funding difficulties
for schools.
Elders gave the statistic that there
were three times as many prisons as
schools. "It's a large and important prob-
lem," Spoon said.
"Engler did a thorough job of pin-
pointing the problems," said LSA se-
nior Stacy Weinberg, "but he gave no
realistic solutions."
Rep. Beverly Hammerstrom (R-Te
perance), a member of the House R
publican Task Force on Higher Educa-
tion, was more positive about Engler's
vision. "We're going to see more money
(in schools)," she said. "I've known
John Engler for a long time, and he
knows how to get there even ifhe doesn't
vocalize his exact plans in his speech."

JANUARY 23th-BURSLEY HALL
JANUARY 24th-MOSHER-JORDAN
JANUARY 25th-SOUTH QUAD

6:30 PM-McGREAHM-SIWIK LOUNGE
6:30 PM-NIKKI GIOVANNI LOUNGE
6:30 PM-WEST LOUNGE

APPLICATIONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AT ALL RESIDENCE HALL FRONT DESKS
AND AT THE CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS OFFICE, ROOM G-121 IN SOUTH QUAD.
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 936-0383.
check our web page at http://www.conferences.housing.umich.edu/conferences/
AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTIONIEQUAL. OPPORTUNITY FNPIA)VER
Ui vty ~housing-A Unit or the Divson or Studtnt Affain

Opening Friday, January 19
Michigan Theater
603 E. Liberty
Info Line: (313) 668-8480
http:/lwww.michtheater.com/mVl

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan