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March 29, 1996 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-03-29

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10 - Thie Michigan Daily - Friday, March 29, 1996

RECORDS
Continued from Page 8
band narrte, and for that they deserve
little mer(y).
"Alrighs." fades in pleasantly with a*
piano and a tremoloed guitar, momen-
tarily dupiing the listener into believing
that he oir she's in store for a good
album. Bt* no, the mindless lyrics of
the chorus .come in, we're subjected to
two guitar:%olos in which the slide loses
its novelty a nd the song goes on for two
minutes top) long. After that, one is
almost prey uhred for the wearisome col-
lege-rock tlat follows.
Fact: Thr(r of the four members of this
group sing. W can be fun, with bands who
feature multile singers, to guess who's
singingonth Oirrecords. This sort ofthing
is difficult wRh whirlingRoad, however,
seeing as ho's, one is too busy trying to ;
guess fanyor W's singing, orat least, what
he's singing about. The vocals here tend
to hang low ini the mix and as a result,
songs like "Leafing Through," "Small"
and "Do Thejy Know" have difficulty
getting off the ground.
High point s of "Twelve Steps" in-

elude the artful interplay between the
turntables, guitar ind vocals of "Not
Yet Gone," the ;ermonica-colored
charm of "Baby" and the ironic de-
bauchery of"With Hachother,"but more
overwhelming (and not quite so pleas-
ant) is the unintentional irony that lies
behind the grandiose rock star radio
talk which just doesn't fit "Bend" -
ironic, because this song exemplifies
the sort of music that will lock
whirlingRoad into a tate of obscurity.
- Thomas Crowley
Various ArtIbsts
Hand in Hand:
Songs of Parenthood
Music for Little Peo*/Warner Bros.
Records
Ahh. An album as diverse as they
come celebrating the diversity of par-
ents who've raised a makt diverse crop
of children. In "Hand in Hand" can be
found The Pretenders singing a remake
of the well-known "Fooever Young."
Adult contemporary singer Marc Cohn

performs a very emotional "The Things
We've Handed Down," while the lean-
on-me man, Bobby McFerrin, performs
"Baby," an outstanding a cappella col-
laboration featuring him and four back-
ground singers. The all-woman gospel
sextet, Sweet Honey in the Rock, does
a great job with "On Children," and
Joni Mitchell does an equally good job
with the folk-sounding "Circle Game."
Yoko Ono sings a weird "Wake Up"
song - the kind of song a mom would
sing to a 4-year-old; it has frog croaks
in the background, go figure. Tom Rush
puts parental guidance into a country-
music format with "Child's Song." And
one mustn't overlook "Sunshine."
Ferron's voice sparkles singing this
song.
"Hand in Hand" does an amazing job
of taking a wide variety of parenting
experiences and condensing them into
a single album of unbelievable simplic-
ity, yet unimaginable depth. This is a
very relaxing album. Nothing upbeat,
nothing up-tempo- the songs here are
a most laid-back delve into the mixed-
blessings world of parenthood. "Hand
in Hand" is simply beautiful.
- Eugene Bowen

Brass returns to friendly Ann Arbot

By Stephanie Love
For the Daily
If there has ever been an attempt to
build an audience for brass quintet in
Ann Arbor, the Canadian Brass have
done it. Not only will Saturday mark
one more of the many times this group
has played on campus, but according to
French horn player David Ohanian, "the
audience knows what to expect, and
we're looking forward to the relaxation
and acceptance that the Ann Arbor au-
dience has always provided."
Drawing on a wide variety of sources
including showtunes, opera, Baroque
suites and, ofcourse,jazz, the Canadian
Brass will present an eclectic mix of
music in its distinctive performance
style. Ohanian described Saturday's
performance as a "magazine show - a
little of this, a little of that and keep
moving along. We aren't going to get
bogged-down by works of great length."
The program, beginning with an En-
glish Baroque Suite, features works by
Handel, Bach and Purcell. The group
then switches gears to include Bizet's
"Carmen" and three pieces from its
new album "Swingtime," a collection
of jazz and big band favorites. The
second half of the program showcases
the strong jazz
thread present in THE CAN
much of the group's
work BRASS
Ohanian says that Where: Hill Aud
the goal of the When: Saturda
group's perfor- Tickets are $1E
mances is to 2538 for morei
"demystify classical
music, keeping the audience's interest,
because the worst thing that can happen
is for a concert audience to get bored."
Canadian Brass concerts are far from
boring. They attract a diverse following
who flock to watch the group's zany
antics. Despite the lighthearted ap-
proach, Ohanian stresses that they're
"really not comedians. Without the
music, we have no show at all." And it
is the music, a combination of flawless

The Canadian Brass knows how to get down. It will perform at Hill tomorrow

-~ N
Thle Michigan Pops Orchestra
Sunday, March 31 at 2pm
Michigan Theater
Showcasing music from Phantom of the Opera,
Beauty and the Beast, West Side Story, Jurassic Park,
and works by Copland, Elfman, Tchaikovsky
Come hear the University's newest orchestra!
U. $6 general admission / $4 students, seniors, children'
Tickets available at the Michigan Union Ticket Office
Charge by phone: 763-TKTS
Sponsored by: UAC, Programming Grants Council, MSA, LSA Student Government, RHA, Rackham Student Government, KKT/TBE
M

A
dit
in

ensemble playing and incredible virtu-
osity that makes the group's popular
among audiences.
The Canadian Brass has expanded
the realms of brass music since its for-
mation in 1970.
DIAN The group
- spends an aver-
age of 220 days
onum per year on the
at 8 p.m. road and has
$28. Call 764- toured Europe,
formation. China, Japan, the
Middle East and
the former Soviet Union. In addition,
the Canadian Brass play more than 135
concerts in North America each year.
The group has appeared as featured
guest artists with many leading Ameri-
can orchestras, and it performs at pres-
tigious summer music festivals such as
Tanglewood, WolfTrap, Mostly Mozart
and the Hollywood Bowl. Through the
sales of its nearly 30 albums and nu-
merous concert appearances, the Cana-

dian Brass grosses nearly $2 million a
year. This is quite an accomplishment,
considering that just 26 years ago the
idea of a brass quintet succeeding in
performance was almost unheard of.
The Canadian Brass have rece
collaborated with Star of Indiana,
premiere brass and percussion corps, t
present the critically acclaimed, full
staged program entitled "An Evenin
of Brass Theater," now in its third sea
son. In addition, during the 1995-9
concert season, the Canadian Brass will
be performing in cities such as Boston,
Chicago, West Palm Beach and Port
land, and it will appear with orchestras
including the Baltimore Symphony and
the Utah Symphony. The group s
also give nearly 40 concerts in Europe.
But despite the exotic tour destina-
tions, the Canadian Brass has always
had an affectionaie relationship with
Ann Arbor audiences. "Ann Arbor is
always a special stop for us," Ohanian
said.

GIANNI SCHIccHI d
IL CAMPANELLO

SUNG IN ITALIAN
WITH SUPERTITLES
DIRECTED BY JOSHUA MAJOR
THE UNIVERSITY
PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA
CONDUCTED BY PIER CALABRIA
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
MARCH 28 - 30 AT 8PM
MARCH 31 AT 2PM
TICKETS ARE $16 AND $12
CHARGE BY PHONE: 313.764.0450
STUDENT SEATING IS $6 WITH ID
AT THE LEAGUE TICKET OFFICE
&ifool of usic
Opera Okealre

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cQ.,ov anwdiMe lau
two de141fl4
funnyj operasl5

ohf6Oqja
A Oo ,most .6 /
0~ 0.
=r * f
1* Y j'Ou caul' '?
4ctoo much '
or a parking spO'
Don't let excuses make you
DIZZY -
With our high-speed
machines you can still get by
with a little help from your
friends.

Continued from Page 9
concept album about crushes and unre-
quited love. "I had never written any
love songs before, and then I started
writing a buhch of them," Waronker
explained. "I thought it would be fun if
we could. put it together as a themed
album.

--

AC/DC
Continued from Page 8
to swing on the wrecking ball and also
inside the six-foot bell the band used for
"Hells Bells." On "Boogie Man," the
band utilized the video screens to the
utmost of their ability by showing not
only live footage, but also clips from
the original version of "Dracula" both
in black and white, and cut back and
forth for a grand effect. Toward the end
of the song, Angus even decided to
share his middle-aged body with the
crowd, performing a strip tease and
ending in a full moon.
But it was the band's performance
that outshone all the antics and toys the

boys brought with them. Rocking ren-
ditions of "You Shook Me All Night
Long" and the new track, "Hard A5
Rock," were great. Angus finished*
the first set with a fiery solo wailing
from his black Gibson SG, and the-band
returned to play a two-song encore witi
their Satanist anthem "Highway to Hell'
and "For Those About to Rock," filled
with the thunderous ringing ofsix work-
ing cannons.
While the weakness of Johnson's
voice warranted questioning on th
group's latest record, his live per
mance leaves no questions in mind -
that he, Angus and the rest of the AC/
DC crew will be around for quite.
while, creating their potent and lovabh
rock'n'roll.

"It's a collection," she continued. "A
collection of different boys and diff~
ent stories put together. Everybk
writes love songs - at first I swore I'd
never do it, but I had no choice. Now I
sort of feel that that's my calling and ]
can't help it," she added with a laugh
As long as she and the rest of That Dog
can weatherthe odd blizzard ortwo, her
calling will be heard loud and clear.

,#1

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