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January 16, 1996 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-01-16

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSTuesday - Tuesday, January 16, 1996

_ __

Athlet-Departmentshould follow
Unversity s attempt at dversity

NATIONAL COLLEGE

For 10 years now, America has
celebrated the birthday of
slain civil rights leader Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
The holiday to me is a reminder
of progress. Not just previous
progress, but progress that still
needs to be made.
As part of the University Sympo-
sium yesterday at Hill Auditorium,
University President James J.
Duderstadt spelled out the growth
of students and faculty of color at
Michigan. He said that the Univer-
sity is at its highest enrollment of
minority students ever - 25
percent.
While other universities, particu-
Aarly the University of California
system, look to axe affirmative
action programs, Duderstadt, to his
credit, has stood firm on his pledge
to the Michigan Mandate, the
University's commitment to
diversity.
Some say that affirmative action
programs are unfair discrimination
and that society should go back to
the way it used to be. If we went
back to the way things used to be, I

think we would all be in trouble.
Mass riots, lynchings, cities on fire
and other acts of violence are the
way things used to be.
Michigan has shown itself to be a
leader in
affirmative
action pro-
grams and
deserves some
praise.
There is one
area, though,
that Michigan
ANTOINE cannot applaud
itself. There is
Pits definitely a
Stop lack of people
of color
coaching and
administrating the school's athletic
teams. What makes this so hard to
believe is the sheer number of
minority students at the University
that participate in athletics.
If you ever have a chance to look
at a Michigan football or basketball
program, you'll find something -
quite remarkable. Look at the team
rosters and you'll find a large

number of minority athletes. But
turn to the pages with the Univer-
sity coaches and athletic administra-
tors and you'll find very few
African Americans.
It's all right for the University to
have minorities such as Chris
Webber, Desmond Howard, Jalen
Rose, Tyrone Wheatley, Tshimanga
Biakabutuka, Maurice Taylor and
others to be out on the field or
court; however, there are few
people of color in the front office.
This is no different than the rest
of the sporting world, where it's OK
to have minorities on the field but
few make it into coaching and
management. That doesn't make it
all right for Michigan to do it.
Of the 24 head coaches at the
University, a mere two are African
Americans.
You find few other minorities
working in the athletic administra-
tion office.
The Athletic Department takes
great pride in the strides it has made
to come under compliance of Title
IX, the Gender Equity Act. The
See PITTS, Page 7B

1
{
2
1
I
I

Atlantic Coast Conference
Conferencet
Wake Forest 3-0
Georgia Tech 3-0
N. Carolina 3-1
Clemson 2-1
Virginia 2-2
N.C. State 1-2
Florida State 1-2
Maryland 0-3 t
Duke 0-4

Overall
10-1
10-7
12-3
11-1
7-5
10-4
9-4
6-6
9-6

Atlantic 10

Conference Overall

East
Temple 4-0
Massachusetts 3-0
Rhode Island 1-1
St. Bonaventure 1-3

St. Joseph's
Fordham
West
Virginia Tech
G. Washington
Xavier
Dayton
Lasalle
Duquesne
Big East 7
Georgetown
Syracuse
Pittsburgh
Seton Hall
Miami Fla.
Rutgers
Providence
Big East 6
Connecticut
Villanova
Boston College
St. John's
Notre Dame
West Virginia

0-1
0-3
2-0
2-0
2-1
1-2
0-2
0-3

7-6
14-0
9-4
5-7
4-5
2-9
9-1
8-3
6-6
9-5
3-10
5-7

Big Sky
Montana
Montana St.
Boise St.
Idaho St.
Weber St.
Idaho
Northern Ariz.
Eastern Wash.
Big West
Santa Barbara
Long Beach St.
Utah St.
San Jose St.
U.C. Irvine
Nev.-Las Vegas
Pacific
Fullerton St.
Nevada
New Mexico St
Conference U
Red Division
Ala.-Birmingha
So. Mississippi
Tulane
South Florida
White Division
Memphis
Louisville
N.C. Charlotte
Blue Division
Cincinnati
Marquette
St. Louis
DePaul
Ivy League
Pennsylvania
Harvard
Dartmouth
Princeton
Brown

t.
SA
im

Conference Overall
3-1 6-6

Oregon
Washington
Stanford
Southern Cal
Arizona
Oregon State
Washington State
Arizona State

2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
0-3

9-5
9-4
8-4
9-6
11-3
3-9
8-4
5-6

2-1
2-1
3-2
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-3
1-2
1-3

7-5
8-7
4-9
5-6
5-7
6-7
3-10
8-5
4-8

-i- .

BASKETBALL STANDINGS
Ball State 2-2 6-6
Conference Overall Kent T-3 7-5
2-0 12-3 Ohio 1-3 6-9
2-0 10-5 Central Mich. 1-3 4-8
2-0 6-8 Akron 0-4 3-9
2-0 5-7C
0-2 8-7 Pacific-10 Conference
0-2 5-7 Conference Overall
0-2 3-10 UCLA 4-0 11-3
0-2 2-11 California 3-1 8-4

Southeastern Conference
Conference

Conference Overall

2-1
2-1
1-2
0-3

12-5
8-6
7-5
7-6

East
Kentucky
Vanderbilt
South Carolina.
Georgia
Florida
Tennessee
West
Alabama
LSU
Auburn
Mississippi St.
Arkansas
Mississippi

Conference Overall
4-1 14-2
4-1 13-2
3-1 8-3
3-3 7-6
2-4 8-6
1-3 4-8
1-5 8-6
Conference Overall
6-0 14-1
5-1 13-2
4-2 11-3
1-3 7-5
0-5 5-7
0-5 5-7

4-0
2-2
2-2
1-2
1-2
1-3-
31
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
0-3

Overall
13-1
1l-5
8-4
10-3
6-7
7-6
9-3
9-5
14-3
10-3
9-5
5-7

3-0 11-2
2-1 10-6
2-1 8-5

Men's volleyball drops 5-set
match to Western Michigan

3-0
1-1
0-3
0-3
Conference
3-0
3-1
3-1
2-1
0-2
0-2
0-2
0-2

11-0
9-3
8-5
7-7
Overall
4-5
10-5
8-5
9-5
5-8
4-8
4-10
3-8

Southwest Conference
Conference Overall
Texas Tech 2-0 '12-1
Houston 2-0 7-6
Texas 1-1 8-4
Rice 1-1 8-5
Baylor 1-1 6-8
Southern Methodist 1-1 5-8
Texas A&M 0-2 8-6
Texas Christian 0-2 9-7
Western Athletic Conference
Conference Overall

Big Eight Conference
Conference

By Mark Snyder
Daily Sports Writer
Exp'erience is the root of success -
most of the time.
But that is not the case with the
Michigan men's volleyball team.
Saturday night, the 1996 version of
the Wolverines began to focus its en-
ergy on the new season.
Michigan faced Western Michigan
looking to make a respectable show-
ing, but it far exceeded those modest
expectations.
The Wolverines pushed the Bron-
cos to the limit with a five-set thriller,
culminating in a narrow Bronco vic-
tory.
Saturday was supposed to be a
chance for Michigan to see what kind
of team it had and to begin feeling its
way as the Big Ten season approached.
Saturday's defeat was more of a vic-
tory.
Western Michigan finished in the
top five at last season's national cham-
pionships, and returned all of its start-
ers this season. Michigan was clearly
overmatched but came through with a
strong showing nonetheless.
The Wolverines fell 16-14, 10-15,
15-11, 11-15, 15-9. Michigan played
Western tougher than the players ex-

pected.
"The team looked really good and
they played a lot better than we ex-
pected," assistant coach Chad Sticlstra
said. "We had them down 14-5 in
game one and played solid in games
two, three and four."
The Wolverines return only one
starter from last season's team, which
finished fifth in the Midwest regional
last year.
Despite lacking experience, the
squad is primed to compete in one of
the most difficult conferences in the
nation. The Big Ten is headed by
perennial national powerhouse Michi-
gan State, and tough from top to bot-
tom. Illinois returns a strong team so
the battle for supremacy is a tight
race.
Michigan's second-place confer-
ence finish last year is reason for
hope. Although most of the starters
did not return, the high finish gives
them a goal to match.
"As soon as we get consistency, we
should be one of the top teams in the
Big Ten," captain Jamie Reynolds
said.
And that is no small feat. The Spar-
tans bring their powerhouse to Ann
Arbor this Wednesday night to face

the Wolverines in their first confer-
ence match.
One reason for the lack of matches
that these athletes have played in is
the nature of the sport.
With the exception of the East
Coast, most of college men's volley-
ball teams compete as a club team.
The players attend a tryout and must
earn a spot on the team year after
year. The lack of scholarships hinders
the cohesion from year to year.
The team is a combination of new-
comers mixed with a few returning
players, but there is one constant.
Michigan coach Kent Booker teaches
fundamentals and controls practices.
Because recruiting is not a part of his
job, Booker is able to concentrate his
efforts on the matches.
Reynolds is the president of the
team, and is responsible for making
the schedule that the team follows.
His dual responsibility of captain com-
bines the leadership aspect onto the
court.
The sport allows everyone an equal
opportunity to show off their talents
despite not offering scholarships.
These Wolverines are out to show
their experience may make them more
hungry than stale.

Oklahoma
Kansas
Missouri
Kansas State
Iowa State
Nebraska
Oklahoma State
Colorado

2-0
1-0
I-0
2-1
1-1
1-1
0-2
0-3

Overall
10-4
12-1
11-4
11-4
12-4
12-4
9-4
5-8

Yale
Columbia
Cornell

Mid American
Conference
Eastern Mich. 4-Q
Toledo 3-l
Bowling Green 3-1
Western Mich. 3-1

Overall
l1-1
10-5
8-4
5-7

San Diego St.
Utah
Colorado St.
Fresno St.
New Mexico
BY U
Texas-El Paso
Wyoming
Hawaii
Air Force

4-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-2
2-2
2-3
1-3
1-4

8-4
11-3
9-4
9-5
13-2
8-5
10-4
7-7
4-9

Miami Ohio

2-2 10-2

4-4 4-9

Added offense may keep The
Great One' in Los Angeles after all

CHICAGO (AP) - Wayne Gretzky
says the addition of two players who
can provide much-needed offensive
punch should be enough to keep him
with the Los Angeles Kings.
Speaking after almost a week of ru-
mors that he is being traded - rumors
the Kings deny - Gretzky said all talk
will be laid to rest this week. He and his
agent, Michael Barnett, are scheduled
to meet with new team owners Edward
Roski and Philip Anschutz today.
"We're going to meet and we'll know
after that," Gretzky said after Sunday's
5-2 loss to the Chicago Blackhawks.
"After (today), it'll be a lot better for
everyone. It's a little (distracting) for
everybody right now -'the team, my
teammates, myself. It's not a fair situa-
tion. Hopefully, after (today), it will be
rectified."
Gretzky has said he'd likely leave
Los Angeles unless the club made a
commitment soon to bring in proven
players to try to win the Stanley Cup.
"I haven't changed my thoughts or
picture," said Gretzky, who led

Edmonton to four NHL championships
before the blockbuster trade that sent
him to the Kings in 1988. "I'd just like
to win. It's as simple as that."
He told the Los Angeles Times he
believes the addition of two solid play-
ers would make the Kings contenders in
a Western Conference that is not strong
beyond Detroit and Colorado.
"We don't have a 50-goal scorer," he
said.
He did not specifically mention any
such players, but he did name Detroit's
Paul Coffey, a former Kings teammate
and close friend, as his wish for an
offensive-minded defenseman. Coffey
was traded in 1993..
The leading career scorer in NHL
history, Gretzky had been limited to 13
goals this season, but has 52 assists to
stand fourth in the league's scoring
race. In his career, Gretzky has 827
goals and 1,744 assists for2,571 points
- all top figures in league history.
Gretzky, who becomes a free agent
this summer, has said he'd prefer to go
elsewhere if Los Angeles decides to

rebuild with young players.
Gretzky himselfhas continued to send
mixed signals about whether any d"s
were in the works, while publishe& -
ports said that moves have been made.
"I don't put any stock in all thexru-
mors," he said. "But, as they say, where
there's smoke, there's fire."
On Saturday night, St. Louis Blues
general manager-coach Mike Keenan
said his organization is "very inter-
ested" inacquiring Gretzky.
Also on Saturday, The Toronto Sun
reported a deal with St. Louis r
Gretzky was "virtually done" and ,at
Los Angeles would receive five prom-
ising players and draft picks. T-he
Toronto report, which cited unidenti-
fied sources, said theplayers were.Chris
Pronger, Roman Vopat, Craig Johnson,
Patrice Tardif and Denis Chasse.
Gretzky, who'll earn $6.5 milion
this season, is expected to cost a new
team up to $9 million per year. r
Keenan said Gretzky, who turns 35
on Jan. 26, isn't expected to retire i1
after the 1997-98 season.

-

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