100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 06, 1996 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1996-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

#1- .1

Gervin, Thompson to enter Hall
Yesterday, David Thompson and George Gervin both scored. The two
were elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame. Also elected were Olympian
Nancy Lieberman-Cline, former UCLA star Gail Goodrich and former Piston
George Yardley, the first player to score 2,000 points in one season. But the
controversial Jerry Tarkanian, who owns the best winning percentage among
college coaches, did not receive enough votes to warrant enshrinement.

February

"ft
Tuesday
r6, 1996 v
4
k h '
title;Es

...........444444*..*44'Y4y.t 1 4 . +r
. . . ..4.. 44'.. ..ll,$.aNO W
m x1;4'.t' H__ > fI1I.N ..aPusztaww nsi di id a
. e "" d a
Y. }$+?: ;v6xrT .b-*Ir*
a? t e4 a . p +F' . .5

Blue unable to match feat

m

By Richard Shin
For the Daily
Last week, Michigan No. I singles
player, Peter Pusztai, faced the Big
Ten's best and came out with a cham-
pionship win.
Thispast weekend, at the O'Charley's
Invitational in Tennessee, Pusztai led
the Michigan men's tennis team into
the tournament to face some of the
nation's best teams, hoping to capture a
team championship.
Pusztai lost only one match the en-
tire weekend. But despite Pusztai's
efforts the Wolverines were unable to
capture the team title, falling in the
final to ninth-ranked South Alabama.
This was the first time in five tries
that the Wolverines advanced to the
championship match, and it was the
first title for the Jaguars. Michigan
went 7-6 in the tournament.
In the first round, the Wolverines
faced No. 30 South Florida, led by the
19th-ranked player in the nation,
George Bastl. Pusztai made quick
work of Bast], winning, 6-2, 6-4, as
the Wolverines slipped past the Bulls,
4-3. Key wins by David Paradzik,
Pusztai, and Jake Raiton at singles led

the charge as Michigan advanced to
the winner's bracket for the second
straight year.
The Wolverines advanced to semi-
finals to face a Tennessee team ranked
six places higher in the nation at No.
19. M'ichigan won handily, 5-2, be-
hind the strength of itsdoubles teams
and a two-set victory by Pusztai over
11th-ranked Pablo Montana at No. 1
singles. Michigan No. 2 singles player
John Costanzo teamed with Pusztai to
defeat Tennessee's 4th-ranked duo.
The championship match pitted
third-seeded Michigan against the No.
I seed in the tournament, ninth-ranked
South Alabama. The Wolverines, car-
rying the momentum of strong play at
all positions and an upset victory in
the semifinals, hoped to knock off the
Jaguars in similar fashion.
But South Alabama would prove to
be too much, as the Jaguars won four
out of six singles matches and took
the doubles point to hand Michigan
its first loss of the tournament, 5-2.
The Wolverines' two points came at
No. I singles, as Pusztai extended his
singles winning streak to nine
matches, upsetting fourth-ranked Jan

Hermansson in three sets, and at No.
5 singles, as Geoff Prentice defeated
Johan Westburg.
Although the team fell short of its
goal of a team title, the strong show-
ing in Tennessee is encouraging fo
Michigan which gears up for a. full
slate of Big Ten dual meets.
Pusztai came into the tournament
as the 64th-ranked singles player in
the nation, but his performance against
higher-ranked foes supported Michi;
gan coach Brian Eisner's statement
that Pusztai "matches up with any
player in the nation." In the tourna.
ment, no player proved to be a match
for Pusztai.
In both singles and doubles, Pusztai
was dominating. He and Costanzo;
the 29th-ranked duo in the nation won
8-1, in the first round and upended-the
No.4 tandem from Tennessee in round
two, 8-3. Pusztai's only defeat cam
in the finals when Hermansson and
Nic Chisholm beat the pair, 8-4.
In singles, however, Pusztai was
nearly invincible. He defeated the top
three singles players in the tourna
ment, who all suffered their only losse
to Pusztai.

JOL WESTRAT/UJaily

Bittersweet weekend for netters
John Costanzo teamed up with Peter Pusztai to defeat Tennessee's No. 4 doubles team. Michigan's tennis squad went to
Tennessee hoping to win a team title but came away with only an individual championship from Pusztai.

AP Men's Basketball Poll
Here is the latest Associated Press men's college
basketball poll for games played through Feb. 4. First-
place votes are in parentheses.

M' lCers unable to put away tough opponents

IL Masschusetts (58)
2. Kentucky (7)
3. Kansas
4. Connecticut (1)
5. Cincinnati
6. Villanova
7. Utah
8. Georgetown
9. Wake Forest
10. Penn State
11. Virginia Tech
12. North Carolina
13. Texas Tech

21-0
18-1
18-1
21-1
17-1
18-3
18-3
19-3
14-3
16-2
16-2
16-5
18-1

14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.

Purdue
Memphis
Arizona
UCLA
Syracuse
Iowa
Louisville
Iowa State
Boston College
Michigan
E. Michigan
Stanford

17-4
16-4
16-4
15-5
16-6
15-6
16-6
16-4
13-5
15-7
16-2
13-5

By Nicholas J. Cotsonika
Daily Sports Editor
The Michigan hockey team is re-
ally no different than the typical play-
ground bully.
It's not that the fourth-ranked Wol-
verines are physically beating up on
their competition - except for a few
blows dealt by the likes of Jason
Botterill and Warren Luhning. It's
just that they seem to love the unfair
fight.
When games are decided by three
or more goals, Michigan is usually

,,

kicking dirt in the
nent, going 18-2.
When teams
stand up to the Wol-
verines, however,
knees buckle,
palms sweat, and
the job doesn't get
done most of the
time. Michigan is
2-3 in one-goal
games and has re-
corded two ties so

face of its oppo-

Iockey
Notebook

,
i y ' :

,

II
F 44
f '
t_

far this season, both coming in the
past 10 days.
Michigan coach Red Berenson
downplays the significance of this
statistic - "I'm not concerned about
that," he said - but he might wonder
if the Wolverines' history bodes prob-
lems for the late-season push.
Michigan has beaten most of the
teams it was expected to this season,
trouncing Notre Dame, Ferris State,
Illinois-Chicago and Miami (Ohio).
But against teams that are supposed
to be good tests, the Wolverines have
struggled.
Tight games against Minnesota,
Michigan State and Bowling Green
were too much for Michigan. In No-
vember, the Gophers got by a flat
bunch of Wolverines, 3-2. Three days
later, the Spartans outworked Michi-

SARA STILLMANJDaily
Blake Sloan and the Wolverines have had trouble putting away the better teams in the CCHA this season.

gan, 4-3, in what Berenson called one
of the "best games of the season."
The Wolverines did rebound from
an embarassing 7-2 defeat to Western
Michigan to down the Broncos, 3-2,
in October. They also beat Michigan
State, 3-1, in the Great Lakes Invita-
tional final in December.
But other than those two games,
Michigan hasn't won any hotly con-
tested battles. That has left many won-

dering whether a team that can only
win easy games consistently deserves
such a high national ranking.
"We're not as good as everyone
thinks," Berenson said Saturday. "We
definitely had some great games, but
we're not a team that is unbeatable or
a team that's going to walk through
the season."
That has been easy to see the past
two weeks. After tying the then-cel-
lar-dwelling Buckeyes, 4-4, and los-
ing to the Falcons, 6-5, Jan. 26 and 27,
it seemed Michigan would be aggra-
vated enough to destroy Ohio State
the next weekend.
The Wolverines did Friday. They
played strong defense and won yet
another laugher, 7-0.
But the Buckeyes came back the
next night, wearing new black duds
and none of the fear common to Yost
Ice Arena visitors, and earned a 2-2
tie.
"It's good that we played in these
games," Berenson said. "It will teach
our kids to play with more patience."
Perhaps it will also help them pre-
pare for the rest of their schedule,
which promises more tough games.
Michigan State, Lake Superior and
Bowling Green all loom ahead, as do
the CCHA playoffs.
MORRISON'S HOTEL: It seemed
Michigan forward Brendan
Morrison was away at some hotel
last weekend, sending postcards to
his teammates signed, "Wish you were

here." .
"We missed Brendan, sure,".
Berenson said. "Whenever your top
scorer is out of the lineup, you miss
him."
Actually, Morrison is sidelined with
a wrist sprain that he incurred Jan. 27
at Bowling Green. Morrison has been
skating since the middle of last week,
but he is still in a cast.
Berenson and the team doctors fe'
Morrison should take a break agains
the Buckeyes.
"(The wrist) is still a little sore, and
there's no need to rush him," Berenson
said.
Morri'son may be back for this
weekend's trip to Notre Dame and
Illinois-Chicago.
BLACK BUCKS: Ohio State coach
John Markell had a surprise for his
team Saturday.
When the players walked into thU
lockerroom before their game-with
Michigan, they found brand new black #
uniforms hanging in their lockers.
The sweaters were black with white,
red and gray trim. They had the Ohio;
State logo on the chest and shoulders
and had script numbers inspired by
the NHL's Tampa Bay Lightning.
The use ofblack represented a break
from Buckeye tradition. But after OhM
State's 7-0 loss to the Wolverine
Friday night, Markell could have cared
less.
"You need to do anything to get an
edge on these guys," Markell said.

r DO IT IN
THE DORM
.,~- I .~ORWHSTORY L7.~~
' IG f'c1O -- ~ J

Croot Rm, M IUnion _/I I
E. LMIS C

Jesus at 2000
a teleconference by the
Trinity Institute will be hosted by

I

I

NoU

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan