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January 30, 1996 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-01-30

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 30, 1996 - if
Men's ers take to the warm confines of Canham

By Susan Dann
Daily Sports Writer
Michigan wintergetting you down?
Cold, dry air clogging your head?
You don't have to call Kathy Lee
and reserve a spot on a Carnival Cruise
to get away.
There is a refuge from the freezing
temperatures, snow and wind - a
place where January temperatures
hover near 80 degrees,
The Michigan men's swim team

escaped the winter
conditions for a few
hours this weekend
in Canham Natato-
rium right here in
Ann Arbor.
In a two-day meet
with Indiana and
Michigan State, the
Wolverines enjoyed
77.5 and 80.5 degree
temperatures on Fri-

Notebook

widely known for its die-hard fans, the
cheers echoing through Canham
sounded like a high school basketball
game.
"The cheering really motivates
you," Michigan swimmer Chris
Rumley said. "It gives you an extra
rush of adrenaline. When there is noise
in general, both teams are more
psyched up and both teams will swim
a faster meet."
In addition to fan support, the Wol-
verine bench is a major motivating
factor. Swimmers can be heard whis-
tling at every breath and waving the
competitors toward the wall.
"You can't help but see them,"
Rumley said. "They get right in your
face, so you can't really avoid them."
So WHAT IF HE'S A NATIONAL CHAM-
PION? Swimmers aren't usually known
as high-profile athletes. But don't tell
this to Evan Bennett, a young Wol-
verine swimming connoisseur.
"I know a lot of the swimmers be-
cause I've come to a lot of meets,"
Bennett said. "I've been coming to
meets a lot with my dad."
After the meet, with pen and media
guide in hand, Bennett got the auto-
graphs of Wolverine swimmers and
coaches.
When asked if he knew that he had
the signatures of national champions
and potential Olympians, Bennett
chuckled.
"Yeah, but I've grown up with it."
Better not let sports promotions or-
ganizer Mike Bertolini get wind of

Bennett's prized possessions.
BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BE-
HOLDER: Some people compare ath-
letes to artists. The fluid movements
of the athletes appear choreographed,
like those of a ballet troupe.
Athletes can not only perform, but
they can also act as canvases.
Body art has become a popular form
of expression among collegiate ath-
letes. This weekend's swim meet
against Indiana and Michigan State
was no exception.
Members from all three teams could
be seen displaying tattoos, many with,
nautical themes such as dolphins.
The locations of choice were the
bicep and the shoulder.
"(My tattoo is on my shoulder) be-
cause I can look at it and say that's
cool," said Michigan's Jason
Lancaster, turning toward his right
shoulder. "But I don't have to look at
it every day."
Among his body art collection,
Lancaster also prominently displays
earrings and an eyebrow ring.
Although some teams don't allow
their athletes to act as human can-
vases, Lancaster believes in artistic
expression.
"I hear about teams like Stanford
not allowing earrings or tattoos,"
Lancaster said. "When you disallow"
it, you are taking away a swimmer's'
personality. In a sport as individual as
swimming, you have to let a person be=
who they are.
"I consider it a liberation of myself."

The Michigan men's swimming and diving team wil not see its next competition until the Big Ten Championships, Feb.15-
17.
o provesto e aquick
learner and teaml eaderlfor spiers

day and Saturday, with humdity adding
to the tropic-like feeling.
The air temperature in Canham is
kept one to 1.5 degrees above the
water temperature.
That makes the water temperature
about 81 or 82 degrees.
Calgon, take me away.
IF YOU CAN'T BE AN ATHLETE, BE AN
ATHLETIC SUPPORTER: About 300 fans
enjoyed this weekend's matchups at
Canham. A large number of fans
donned Hoosier cream and crimson
and Spartan green.
Although swimming is a sport not

Sy Mark Snyder
Daily Sports Writer
As the leader of a team, a captain is
usually the player with the most experi-
ence.
On the Michigan men's volleyball
team, the captain happens to be the one
who didn't even think about the sport
two years ago.
Jamie Reynolds entered volleyball
outs for the Wolverines last year
unsure of what to expect. He has re-
ceived quite an education in the last 18
months.
"I had never played organized vol-
leyball before," Reynolds said, refer-
ring to the tryouts.
His lack of experience did not im-
pede his ability. Reynolds was the last
addition to the squad, but he has made
the most of his opportunity.
S Reynolds is both the captain and the
president of the men's volleyball team.
As captain, his duties extend all around
the court. As the designated representa-
tive of the team, Reynolds needs to
settle all disputes that occur on the
court.
He is the only member of the team
permitted to talk to the referee, and he

acts the part. When another player
speaks up, the team is threatened with a
yellow card, so Reynolds keeps them in
check.
"In terms of volleyball skills, he is
expected to be the go to man," Michi-
gan assistant coach Chad Stilstra said.
"If we ever need a definite kill, he's
there."
Reynolds is a good athlete, able to
cover a great deal of ground on the
court, while at the same time being the
team leader. Statistically, he leads the
unit in kills, the standard by which
players are measured.
His athletic ability is one of the rea-
sons Reynolds is so successful. His 36-
inch vertical leap enables him to block
and spike balls that less athletic players
would miss.
Reynolds' duties as the president of
the club are far more time-consuming
and just as important to the team's re-
sults. Because none of the Big Ten
schools regard men's volleyball as a
varsity sport, each team must make its
own travel arrangements and accom-
modations.
The president is in charge of the

duties normally reserved for people in
the sports department. Reynolds makes
sure that the referees show up for the
matches, rents vans so that the team can
get to its matches, and makes sure that
the team shows up.
This year, Reynolds organized the
tryouts and arranged for the publicity
necessary to attract players.
"(The organization) isoneoftheways
he has taken charge of the team this
year," Stilstra said.
Reynolds' determination also sets an
example fortheotherplayers. Reynolds
attends optional Sunday practices to
search for the extra edge that may make
a difference in the match.
"When it comes to doing sprints and
conditioning work, he's always first,"
Stilstra said.
On off days, Reynolds is playing
pick-up games and gathering the guys
together to improve team cohesion.
After the lack of unity Reynolds said he
saw last season, he views this as a more
together unit.
No matter what the title is that
Reynolds receives, he is where every
captain, president and important figure
should stand on a team - first.

Johnson ending retirement, will make
return against Wamrors tonight at home

AP Men's Basketball Poll
Here is the new Associated Press men's Top 25 basketball poll. First-place votes are in parentheses.

1, Massachusetts (59)
2. Kentucky (3)
3. Kansas
4. Connecticut (1)
5. Cincinnati
6. Villanova
7. Utah
* 8. North Carolina
9. Georgetown
10. Penn State
11. Memphis
12. Wake Forest
13. Virginia Tech

18-0
17-1
16-1
19-1
14-1
16-3
16-3
15-4
17-3
15-1
14-3
13-3
13-2

Pts.
1,571
1,509
1,417
1,402
1,327
1,250
1,072
1,036
1,020
944
940
901
882

Prev.
2
3
4
5
7
10
11
6
14
12
9
8

14. Arizona
15. Texas Tech
16. Iowa'
17. Purdue
18. Syracuse
19. UCLA
20. Michigan
21. Boston College
22. Auburn
23. Eastern Michigan
24. Clemson
25. Georgia Tech

153
16-1
15-4
15-4
14-5
13-5
14-6
12-4
15-4
15-1
12-4
13-8

864;
568
540
524
520
478
276
193
177
160
132
106

13
22
22
19
17
15,
16
20
21
18

The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES-Saying "it's now
or never," Magic Johnson ended a
retirement of more than four years
Monday to play again for the Los
Angeles Lakers, whom he led to five
NBA championships during the
1980s.
Johnson, 36, left the game suddenly
on Nov. 7, 1991, just before the start
of the 1991-92 season after learning
he had tested positive for the virus
that causes AIDS.
He returned the following year, only
to retire again after a handful of exhi-
bition games. That comeback was cut
short when several players and others
connected with the NBA complained
about competing against someone who
had the AIDS virus.
There have been several aborted
Johnson comebacks since then, and
several other speculated comebacks.
Johnson continually changed his mind
and finally, last summer, said he would
never return.
But Johnson changed his mind
again, and displaying his characteris-
tic smile, said that he was so excited
about returning to the game that he
"couldn't sleep for the last two or
three nights."
Johnson signed a contract for the
rest of the season and will play his
first game back against Golden State
tonight at the Forum.
Johnson, who said he's 27 pounds
heavier than when he played his last
game on June 12, 1991, has been prac-
ticing with the Lakers on and off for
about two weeks and will play mostly
at a forward spot.
He also admitted that he's five steps
slower than when he retired in 1991,
Johnson said.
"I know it's going to take me some
time, I'm not in NBA shape. It's go-
ing to take me a month or two. This
team has other people. It's not like I
have to come in and dominate.
Laker spokesperson Bob Steiner
said at the time of Johnson's an-
nouncement yesterday morning, about
2,300 tickets remained for the game.
They were sold within a matter of
hours, thustassuring the Laker's sec-
ond sellout in 22 home games this
season.
The third sellout will be Friday night
in Johnson's second game back when
the Lakers face Michael Jordan and
the rampaging Chicago Bulls.
Johnson said he was "not worried"
about experiencing the kind of nega-
tive reaction he received during his
abortive 1992-93 comeback.

"I'm calm. I'm not worried if there's
criticism or not," he said. "I'm at peace
with myself."
Johnson, who has been practicing
with the team for two weeks, won't be
playing point guard. Instead, he'll be in
the lineup as a forward, and much of the
offense will probably run through him.
When Johnson came back briefly be-
fore the 1992-93 season, he said he might
not play every game. It's different now.

"I'm in full tilt, every game," he said,
"I can imagine (playing a full season).Of
course, you look past this season. Buti
have to concentrate on rightnow. It's like
I'm going to a new school."
As far as tonight's game against
Golden State was concerned, Harris
said: "We'll put him in there and see-
how he does. This team, Golden State,
has been beating us like a rented mule
the last couple of years."

_ : :,
R ' _,,.

/

AP Women's Basketball Poll
Here is the latest Associated Press women's Top 25 basketball poll. First-place votes are in parentheses.

1. Georgia (37)
2. Louisiana Tech (1)
3. Tennessee (2)
4. Connecticut
5. Stanford
6. Iowa
7. Vanderbilt
8. Texas Tech
9. Virginia
10. Wisconsin
11. Old Dominion
12. Duke
13. Penn State

16-2
17-1
17-3
18-3
15-2
17-1
15-2
16-2
15-4
16-2
15-2
17.3
15-5

Pts,
994
918
909
903
841
779
751
746
622
620
617
549
507

P rev
2
4
3
6
8
5
9
7
13
11
12
10

14. North Carolina.St.
15. Alabama
16. Colorado
17. Clemson
18. Oregon State
19. Oklahoma State
20. Mississippi
21. Florida
22. Purdue
23. Northwestern
24. Arkansas
25. Auburn

14-4
16-4
18-5
14-2
12-4
15-3
13-5
15-5
12-8
15-5
15-7
14.5

416
401
390
368
336
210
187
177
176
104
88
79

14
17
16
18
15
24
23
29
21
19
22
25

AP PHOTO

Magic Johnson, shown practicing recently, will suit up for the Los Angeles Lakers
tonight for the first time in more than four years.
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Read Daily Sports tomorrow for a
* preview of Purdue-Michigan
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