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January 23, 1996 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1996-01-23

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8 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 23, 1996

Annual 'Collage' brings down the house

By Michelle Lee Thompson
Daily Arts Writer
Collage XIX may have left hundreds
out in the cold after Hill Auditorium
was filled to capacity Friday night, but
for the 4,300 people who saw the per-
formance, it was one of the liveliest
dynamic concerts ever.
The format of the University's larg-
est and most heralded annual concert

,.-_. ~ 7

Collage
Concert
Hill Auditorium
January 19, 1996
included all its bands, choirs and or-
chestras, which perform theirselections
aback-to-back. A spotlight and the
audience's attention followed perform-
ers on stage, in the balcony, and around
the main floor, and the performance
was uninterrupted between selections.
In such a format, it is essential that
the music be as creative, dynamic and
fast-paced as the performance itself,
and with little exception, the selections
'fit this bill.
The Collage Concert symbolizes a

integration of student musical talent
and dedication across many genres and
disciplines as unique and multifaceted
as the performers themselves.
The concert is the only one around
where a digital music ensemble shares
the stage with the Symphony Band, as
well as a musical theater group and the
Men's and Women's Glee Clubs.
The evening began with a non-sung
rendition of "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner,"performed by the Symphony Band,
which also played a well-integrated
"Amazing Grace" and a slightly long
performance of Roger Nixon's "Fiesta
del Pacifico."
Four animated flutists performed af-
ter the band, and like so many other
performers, they seemed to dance to
their own music in excitement.
Although the digital music
ensemble's "Other Planes of Here,"
composed by trumpeter Mark
Kirschenmann, was certainly inspired
creative, the music itself too closely
resembled action-adventure back-
ground music.
The Chamber Choir mystified the
audience with a Gregorian chant, and
while most members of the audience
could not actually see the performers,
no other auditorium could better sup-
port this well-executed style.

Ed Sarath's "Voice of the Wind,"
performed by the Creative Arts Orches-
tra, was animated and sounded almost
tribal.
The free-styled antics of Josef
Woodson, who accompanied a small
ensemble on Stravinsky's "Valse" and
"Ragtime" from L'Histoire du Soldat,
distracted some of the older members
of the audience, though the dancer kept
rhythm with the fast tempo of the mu-
sic.
An impressive horn adaptation of
Mendelssohn's "Tarantella" from Songs
Without Words showed that such a ho-
mogenous group could indeed do jus-
tice to such a piece, although the perfor-
mance was disappointingly short.
Pianist Hsiao-Lan Chen executed a
graceful and soulful "Etude, Op. 10,
No. 8" by Frederic Chopin. Backed on
stage by about 450 other performers,
Chen easily commanded the attention
of the entire house, as her fingers barely
seemed to touch the keys.
An appropriately excited perfor-
mance of Sondheim's opening from
"Company" by the musical theater
program's graduating class led to a
rough transition into the show's crown-
ing glory: An excerpt from Beethoven's
"Ode to Joy," performed at once by
about 500 students, members of the

glee clubs and the University Choir and
Chamber Choir and the Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Theodore
Morrison. The incredibly captivating
and powerful performance lasted only
about a minute, leaving the audience
thirsting for more.
A round from Gordon Jacob's "Mu-
sic for a Festival,"performed by a brass
ensemble surrounded the main floor
with a talented performance, though
the show would have been enhanced by
better lighting.
A jazz combo's performance of John
Coltrane's"Giant Steps" inspired mem-
bers of the audience to rock in their
seats, thanks to the animated style of
the performers.
The Symphony Orchestra's closing
performance of Respighi's "Pines of
the Appian Way" had all the crescen-
dos and excitement of the entire con-
cert.
Collage was a remarkable event, de-
serving of all the attendance and atten-
tion it always receives. Representatives
of music education from around the
state attended the free concert, but its
strongest supporters were, as always,
students.
The diversity of the performers and
their talents as well as the captivating
format made the evening a true collage.

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Do you want to write film, music, book, theater, concert or any
other type of reviews? Well then, Daily Arts is the place to be!
just stop by the Daily's mass meeting tomorrow at 7 p.m. in the
Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard st.

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Ricnard ureytuss stanas tali and proud In "Mr. Holland's opus."
Sweet sentimental 'ps
By Kristin Long who becomes his mentor and clI
Daily Arts Writer friend. She informs him that the role of
Somesay that asign of agreat movie ateacherentailsmuchImore than simple
is whether or not it can make its audi- instruction within the classroom; italso
ence understand the characters' emo- includes guiding his students to new
tions. If this is the case, then "Mr. arenas of life.
Holland's Opus" has succeeded in what Mr. Holland enters into a school that
most movies of its kind try to do. Seln- haslittlemusichistoryandcreatesaworld
sitive audience members might find in which he and his prodigies makemag-
nificent sounds. Through multiple trial
- -- and error experiments, he works his }
into the lives ofyoung minds by teachIg
Ow ' Mr. Holland's more than just the history of Bach.
In this film, the music enhances the
Opus story. Like Mr. Holland, we are capti-
Directed h vated by the sounds and the feelings of
this medium. Throughout the duration
Stephen iferelt; with aof the flick, he attempts to compose a
Richard Dreyfiss musical selection that he hopes will
At Ann Arbor I 2 become one the finest works ever made.
and Showcase His problem lies in its completion, for
he finds that his life centers around
themselves unabletocontrol theirlaugh- more than his symphony. r
ter and tears. Even those who are not Mr. Holland's marriage and family
quite as emotional might find them- contain communication problems that
selves feeling the same way. only few can understand. Nevertheless,
Richard Dreyfuss stars asGlenn Hol- we are sympathetic toward his house-
land, a man whose lifetime goal has hold dilemmas. His relationship with
been to become a great composer of his students is also admirable. People
captivating music. Throughout the tend to remember the instructors who
course of his life, his dream gets de- have had profound impacts on their
terred; it is here we learn to understand lives. There is no doubt in our minds
this man's compassion. With the hopes that Mr. Holland is one such instruc jr.
of earning some money so that he and While much of this sounds like -
his wife, Iris (Glenne Headly), will be timental mush, "Mr. Holland's Opus"
able to live comfortably, he takes a has its share of humor as well. Mr.
temporary job at John F. Kennedy High Holland finds a cohort in the football
School, where he will teach music. We and wrestling coach, Bill Meister, por-
can only begin to see his dream fall trayed by the whimsical and highly
apart as we sense that he may not quite entertaining Jay Thomas. The twoform
reach his highest goal. a friendship that triggers numerous
Mr. Holland gets off to a rocky start laughs throughout the flick.
because, as he would say, "I received The issues in "Mr. Holland's Opus"
my teaching degree assomethiig to fall tug at ourheartstrings. It is a film that both
back on." At first, his attitude is less all will enjoy, for its merging ofto4
than enthusiastic. On his first day, he is macho and sensitive sides. It has uslaugh-
acquainted with Principal Jacobs, ing and crying simultaneously, as we
playedby the talentedOlympia Dukakis, explore every facet ofMr. Holland's life.

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