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April 14, 1995 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 14, 1995 - 14
U.N. Bosnia official vows
to renegotiate cease-fire

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WE HAVE ENOUGH RELATIVES TO BE VOTED BEST PIZZA IN
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS POLL FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS.
WE CRAM CHEESE AND TOPPINGS ON OUR PIZZA
THE WAY PROCRASTINATING HONOR STUDENTS CRAM
FOR A FINAL EXAM.
WE'RE SO HAPPY TO HAVE JOBS THAT WE GIVE
INCREDIBLY GOOD SERVICE,
MANY OF OUR DELIVERY DRIVERS ARE UNDER-EMPLOYED
PHDS SO THEY CAN OFFER TUTORING FOR TIPS.
THE RESIDUAL AROMA OF A COTTAGE INN PIZZA
ON A FINAL EXAM PAPER HAS BEEN KNOWN TO MAKE
EVEN THE MOST DEMANDING PROFESSOR SMILE.
OUR NEW EUROPEAN GOURMET THIN CRUST PIZZA
IS SO DELICIOUS THAT A STUDENT GOT AN A IN
ITALIAN CULTURE 360 JUST FOR BRINGING ONE TO CLASS.

Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The chief
U.N. official in Bosnia vowed yester-
day to try renegotiating the expiring
cease-fire brokered by former Presi-
dentCarter, but acknowledged "it will
not be easy."
The cease-fire, already rent by
battling in Sarajevo and other areas of
Bosnia, is due to expire at the end of
April.
But Yasushi Akashi of Japan, the
special representative of U.N. Secre-
tary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali
for the former Yugoslavia, told anews
conference at U.N. headquarters in
New York that extending the cease-
fire is "a matter of grave concern" to
the Security Council.
Akashi said he planned to meet
with the leaders of the Muslim-led
Bosnian government in Sarajevo and
the leaders of the Bosnian Serbs in
Rich hit
with 16%
tax hike
in 1993
WASHINGTON (AP) - As the
April 17 filing deadline looms, miser-
able taxpayers can find company
among the affluent. Well-to-do
Americans' taxes surged 16 percent
in 1993, the first year of revisions
pressed into law by President Clinton.
People who earned $100,000 or
more owed the government an addi-
tional $31 billion compared with
1992, according to an Associated
Press computer-assisted analysis of
Internal Revenue Service data. Ev-
eryone else together owed about $3
billion more.
The tax-law revisions were aimed
specifically at reducing the deficit by
tapping people with big incomes.
When President Clinton proposed
raising taxes on high incomes, ex-
perts expected the affluent to create
shelters and loopholes to blunt the
impact, but that does not appear to
have happened.
The law took effect in August
1993, but the new rules were applied
retroactively to January. That took
some tax planners by surprise.
"We did not see a new surge of tax
shelters," said Robert McIntyre of
Citizens for Tax Justice, a Washing-
ton advocacy group. "It's hard to.do,
and it takes time."
Clinton had argued that upper-
income Americans had paid less than
their share of taxes in the years when
Republican presidents Reagan and
Bush sat in the White House.
He said the law asked "the well-
off to pay their fair share, requiring
that at least 80 percent of the new tax
burden fall on those making more
than $200,000 a year, and very little
on any other Americans, not to punish
the successful, but simply to ask some-
thing of the very people whose in-
comes went up most and whose taxes
went down during the 1980s."
The bill added two new tax brack-
ets - 36 percent for income begin-
ning at $115,000 and 39.6 percent

beginning at $250,000 - but gener-
ally left other tax rates alone.
1 1
PRINTING
HIGH QUALITY
LOW PRICES

S0

their mountain stronghold of Pale next
week about the cease-fire but antici-
pated great difficulty. "The parties
for different reasons are unhappy with
the way the agreement was honored
- or dishonored - by the different
parties," he said.
After a dramatic meeting with
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan
Karadzic in Pale almost four months
ago, Carter brokered a cease-fire that
halted the fighting through the bitter
winter months. With the advent of
spring, however, the government
launched a series of attacks in hopes
of regaining some of the ground lost
in the heaviest fighting during 1992
and 1993.
In retaliation, the Bosnian Serbs
resumed the shelling and sniping of
Sarajevo and the harassment of U.N.
convoys transporting food and medi-
cine to besieged towns throughout the

country.
That has led to some barbed ex-
changes between Lt. Gen. Rupert
Smith of Britain, commander of the
U.N peacekeepers in Bosnia, and
Gen. Ratko Mladic, commander of
the Bosnian Serb forces.
Akashi staunchly defended the
peacekeeping mission in Bosnia -
often condemned by critics for failing
to roll back Serbian aggression. He
said the 38,000 peacekeepers in
Bosnia, Croatia and Macedonia make
up "the largest and most complex
peacekeeping operation in the history
of the United Nations."
"The criticisms and disappoint-
ments," Akashi said, "are a function
of erroneous appreciation and un-
justified expectations. Parties to a
conflict always expect much and
sometimes too much of the peace-
keepers."

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COTTAGE INN BREADSTIX

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NEW HOT&TANGY AND GARDEN VEGETABLE
TE PIZZAS HAVE LESS FAT AND CALORIES
YOU EAT THEM STANDING UP OR SITTING DOWN[
WE PURSUE OUR POLITICAL CAUSES
WITHOUT FANFARE.
ND THE #1 REASON WHY COTTAGE INN IS
THE LATE NIGHT FINALS WEEK CHOICE:
G4T TITr kS iNAS WEE

You're out! APPHOTO
National League umpire Joe West speaks to young fans while picketing
outside Yankee Stadium in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., yesterday.
After istakes, hospital
loses its accreditation

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - The hospi-
tal where a man lost the wrong leg and
another patient was mistakenly re-
moved from a ventilator was stripped
yesterday of its accreditation to con-
tinue getting millions in federal funds.
The Joint Commission on Accredi-
tation of Healthcare Organizations took
the action 10 days after a surprise in-
spection. The panel issued a statement
announcing the punishment and would
not elaborate on its findings.
University Community hospital, one
of three major hospitals in the Tampa
area, has 20 days to appeal. In the
meantime, it will retain the accredita-
tion it received two years ago with high
marks - a score of 95 out of 100.
Without accreditation, the private,
not-for-profit hospital cannot qualify
for Medicare and Medicaid reimburse-
ment. The hospital last year received
$52 million from the government pro-
grams - about one-third of its pa-
tient revenue.
"We do not treat these incidents
lightly," said Ken Lightfoot, the
hospital's board chairman. "However,
by singling out UCH, the industry
regulators are refusing to accept the
fact that all, and I repeat all, hospitals
have similar patient incidents."
The problems at the 424-bed hospi-
tal began Feb. 20, when doctors ampu-
tated below the knee the wrong leg of

51-year-old diabetic Willie King.
Less than two weeks later, Leo
Alfonso, 77, died after a technician
mistakenly removed him from a venti-
lator, thinking he was another patient.
Later investigations revealed other
mistakes, including an arthroscopic
surgery performed on the wrong knee
of a patient in February and a tubal
ligation performed without consent
that left a woman partially sterilized.
The American Medical Associa-
tion wants to use the hospital as an
example of how a hospital should not
operate. It has called on the private
accreditation board to release its find-
ings and recommendations.
"Maybe the situation at the Tampa
hospital was unique," said AMA
President-elect Lonnie Bristow.
Another threat to the hospital's
funding looms from the federal Health
Care Financing Administration, which
controls distribution of Medicare and
Medicaid money. It has set an April
20 deadline for a state team to inspect
the hospital and determine if it has
problems that pose an "immediate
and serious" threat to patients.
Six days ago, the state banned al'
elective surgery at the hospital
Florida's Agency for Health Car(
Administration shut down th(
hospital's operating rooms for all bu
emergency cases.

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