100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1995 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday, March 13, 1995 - 5

*PURDUE
Continued from page 1
ing for the first five minutes of the
second half.
The Wolverines went on a 9-1 run
to cut the lead to 44-36 with 12:33 to
play. Purdue called a timeout of its
own and came out with a 9-3 run to
pump the lead back up to 14.
Michigan still didn't fold, though.
The Wolverines continued to go at the
basket. Arare MakhtarNdiaye 3-pointer
with 7:43 to go made it a 55-50 game.
The Boilermakers increased the lead
back to nine before the last Michigan
fury that dropped it to four with 2:17
left.
The Wolverines attempted and
made more field goals than Purdue
but the Boilermakers enjoyed a nice
* advantage at the free throw line.
Purdue shot 44 ties from the charity
stripe compared to 18 for Michigan.
Roberts attempted 13 while teammate
Brad Miller shot 11 times from be-
hind the line.
This Purdue team was a far cry
from the squad that fell by 10 points
to the Wolverines to open the confer-
ence season.
"The biggest change on this team
I've seen is Miller in the post," Fisher
said. "He was a big time factor."
Martin led Purdue with 17 points
while Miller and Roberts scored 12
apiece.

Michigan gets gift from
NCAA selection committee

WEST LAFAYETTE -
Gifts are given for
many reasons - for
example, birthdays, weddings and
graduation.
Sometimes gifts are given
simply because it benefits the giver.
The Michigan men's basketball
team was handed a bid to the
NCAA
Tournament
yesterday. The
selection
committee_
gave the squad
a very
favorable seed
in the Midwest PAUL
Region. The BARGER
first and BARgER
second round haurger
than Life
games are a
mere three
hours away in Dayton.
On top of that, the Wolverines
are matched up with Western
Kentucky in the first round.
Although, the Hilltoppers sport a
26-3 record they are clearly not as
powerful as the other No. 8 seeds in
the field of 64. They have had a
good season, but they are a member
of the lightly-regarded Sun Belt
conference.
All this for a Michigan team that
finished the season 17-13, including
five consecutive losses on the road.
Yesterday's defeat at the hands of
Purdue on national television was
obviously ignored by the
committee.
The Wolverines are one of the
biggest draws in the country.

Placing them in a nearby
Midwestern city allows the NCAA
to exploit the team's financial
capabilities. Leaving Michigan out
of the field was never a possibility.
The Purdue game meant
nothing. The Wolverines tallied
their 17th win Wednesday and
basically bought their ticket to the
big dance.
Michigan does deserve to be in
the field. No team that goes 11-7 in a
conference as tough as the Big Ten
should be relegated to the NIT. But,
let's be honest: The Wolverines were
given a nine seed, they did not earn it.
Against Purdue they played
without enthusiasm. Any
aggressiveness they could muster
was consistently thwarted by the
referee's whistle. In all Michigan
players tallied 30 fouls.
Still, in a season filled with
disappointments, the Wolverines
have proven that they are a good'
ball club. Now the real test begins.
Michigan has many advantages.
Steve Fisher ranks among the top
tournament coaches in the nation.
Jimmy King and Ray Jackson have
played in more NCAA Tournament
games than any other active player.
But the team's biggest question
mark is youth.
The young Wolverines are
excited to play in the tournament,
but their inexperience could lead
them to an early exit. When they
take the court on Thursday they are
not sure what they will find.
The tournament is the ultimate
and Michigan is always a major part
of the spectacle. But no one is sure

if this Wolverine team has what it
takes to make some noise.
Michigan could easily lose to
Western Kentucky in the first
round. On the other hand, if the
Wolverines can defeat the
Hilltoppers, they have a legitimate
shot at beating top-seeded Kansas
in the second.
But Michigan has to come out
and play with a Michigan attitude.
The Wolverines have to go out
there and intimidate the opposition.
Right now there are Kansas fans
who are frightened at the prospect
of playing Michigan, simply
because it is Michigan.
The Wolverines have to plIY
like they have a chance to go to
Seattle. The team has to prove that
they can win away from Crisler.
"We just have to come out and
show that we want it," freshman
Jerod Ward said. "We need to play
hard for 40 minutes."
After the loss to Purdue, the
Michigan players and coaches were
visibly shaken. Their NCAA
tournament bid was in doubt.
Shortly after 6:30 p.m., their minds
were put at ease.
Now the Wolverines get to
unwrap the gift that they and their
fans have been given. The
opportunity to go a long way is
certainly in the realm of
possibilities.
The waiting is over. March
Madness is about to begin, and
Michigan is a major part of it again.
The NCAA selection committee
wouldn't have it any other way.

MICHIGAN (67)

Jackson
Taylor
Ndiaye
Fife
King
Conlan
Baston
Mitchell
Ward

Min.
33t
27
25
30
24
14
27
14

FG
M-A
8-17
5-18
2-5
0-4
6-12
0-1
2-3
2-6

FTReb.
M-A O-T
4-4 4-5
6-7 3-7
0-04-10
0-0 1-2
3-5 1-3
0-0 0-2
0-2 3-5
0-0 2-2

A
2
0
0
3
0
3
0

F
2
5
4
4
4
5
5

Pts.
22
16
5
0
16
0
4
4
0

TONYA BROAD/Daly
Willie Mitchell defends Purdue's Herb Dove during yesterday's game.
BoilerIs shckBig 1Ten

6 0-3 0-0 2-2

0 0

Totals 200 25-691318 22-41 9 30 67
FG%-.362. FT%-.722. Three-point goals: 4-17,.235
(Jackson 2-4, Ndiaye 1-1 King 1-4 conlan 0-1, Ward
0-1 Mitchell 0-2, Fife 0-4). Blocks: I (Baston). Steals:
5 (Baston 2, Jaclson, King, Ndiaye) Turnovers: 11
(Baston 3, King 3, Jackson 2, Fife, Mitchell, Ndiaye),
Technical Fouls: none.

PURDUE (73)
Min.
Martin 25
Jennings 12
Miller 29
Waddell 31
Roberts 29
Hairston 17
Dove 15
Brantley 22
Austin 16
Foster 3

FG FT Reb.
M-A M-A O-T
5-8 4-4 0-3
0-2 1-2 2-2
2-7 8-11 5-10
5-10 3-4 0-2
2-5 8-13 2-3
1-3 1-3 1-2
0-2 0-2 2-2
3-7 4-5 3-6
2-6 0-0 0-0
0-0 0-0 0-0

A
5
1
1
3
3
1
0
0

F
2
2
3
2
1
1
2
t
0
0

Pts.
17
1
12
14
12
3
0
10
4
0
0

Ervin

1 0-0 0-0 0-0

00

Totals 200 20-50 29-4416-3516 14 73
FG%- .400. FT%- .659.Three-point goals: 4-12,.333
(Martin 3-4, Waddell 1-4, Roberts 9-1, Austin 0-3).
Blocks: 4 (Brantley 2, Dove, Miller). Steals: 6 (Austin,
-Dove, Hairston, Martin, Miller, Waddell) Turnovers: 11
(Brantley 3, Miller 2, Waddell 2, Dove, Hairston, Rob-
erts, Team). Technical Fouls: None
Michigan ......27 40 -67
Purdue .......33 40 -73
Mackey Arena; A-14,123
TOURNEY
Continued from page ±
Michigan is hoping fora little youth-
ful energy to push it over the top. It is the
first tournament for freshmen Maceo
Baston, Travis Conlan, Willie Mitchell,
Maurice Taylor and Jerod Ward.
"We have that youthful enthusiasm,"
Jackson said. "Our freshman were tired
and now they've got that exuberance
back."
Fisher, much like he has all season,
was quick say that this freshman-filled
team is much different than one that
made a run to the championship game
in 1992.
"This is a whole different scenario,"
Fisher said. "(This year) we have a
* group that has blended in like most
college freshmen do."
Michigan will need a gigantic effort
from the freshmen and everyone else on
the team should it win its first game. If
the Wolverines get past the Hilltoppers
they will most likely face No. I seed
Kansas on Saturday.
Fornow, though, Michigan is happy
to be in and Jackson gave a little bit of
advice to the rest of the team.
"I told everyone to get ready to put
their black shoes and their black socks
on and get ready to go," he said.
FINAL 8IG TEN STANDINGS

By Antoine Pitts
Daily Basketball Writer
WEST LAFAYETTE - Not too
many people gave them much of a
chance at the beginning of the season
but in the end the Boilermakers had
the last laugh.
Many of the prognosticators had
teams like Indiana, Wisconsin and
Michigan State at the top of their lists
to take the Big Ten championship.
Hardly anybody thought that Purdue
could be the best team in the confer-
ence.
The Boilermakers had lost the
nation's top player in Glenn
Robinson to the NBA. Not too many
people gave them a chance without
him.
Purdue began the season playing.
just as many had thought it would.
The Boilermakers dropped
nonconference games to James Madi-
son and Western Michigan. Purdue
then lost two of its first three Big Ten
games.
The Boilermakers opened confer-
ence play with a 71-61 defeat Jan. 3 at
Michigan.
"I told them to lose the first Big
Ten game doesn't mean anything,"
Purdue coach Gene Keady said. "I've
seen a lot of Big Ten champion teams
lose their first game and come back
over the next 17 games and win the
league. This was one of those situa-
tions where it panned out."
Purdue won its next game at home
against Minnesota but fell to Illinois
three days later for a 1-2 conference
start.
"I really thought that we were in
trouble after Michigan and Illinois
because we had no camaraderie, no
team work," Keady said. "I was afraid.
All of a sudden we go to Iowa and get
our stuff clicking and that turned
things around."
The Boilermakers won their next

phenomenal
- Steve
Michigan basketball

Purdue on a

Fisher
coach

N "V'S"E'' EEE"" **
join the 15,000plus BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK:
in untin

"I uw,,Id him **

Tournament-tested Wolverines
look to add to NCAA resume

six games, including a Feb. 7 show-
down at Michigan State. Despite the
win over the Spartans, Purdue re-
mained a half-game back for first
place in the conference.
A loss at Indiana dropped the Boil-
ermakers to 7-3 in Big Ten play, but
that would be their last loss of the
season. Purdue won its last eight
games of the year - including
yesterday's 73-67 win over Michi-
gan, to take the title.
Purdue didn't reach the top spot
until the last week of the season, but
when the Boilermakers got there they
wouldn't let anyone knock them out.
Michigan State's loss Wednesday
night at Iowa opened the door for
Purdue.
The Boilermakers' 72-59 win at
Minnesota Thursday clinched at least
a tie for first, and yesterday's victory
gave it to them outright.
The team accepted the champion-
ship trophy in front of the fans at
Mackey Arena following yesterday's
game.
"I would like to join the 15,000
plus in congratulating Purdue on a
phenomenal season," Michigan coach
Steve Fisher said. "Gene Keady and
his staff did a fine job with this ball
club."

By Paul Barger
Daily Basketball Writer
WEST LAFAYETTE - The
Michigan men's basketball team en-
ters this year's NCAA Tournament
with high credentials.
The Wolverines' tournament bid
marks the fourth consecutive year
Michigan has made it to the field of
64. This is Michigan's 18th trip to the
tournament.
This is the second time in school
history that the Wolverines have re-
ceived a No. 9 seed.
Seniors Jimmy King and Ray
Jackson enter this tournament with a
13-3 record in the Big Dance, three
trips to the Elite Eight and two trips
two the National Championship game.
Steve Fisher has the highest tour-
nament winning percentage of any
coach with 10 or more tournament
games (83.3 percent). In five seasons
he has led Michigan to a 20-4 record,
including three Final Fours and a na-
tional championship.
The Big Ten will be the most
represented team in the tournament
with six teams. Purdue, Indiana, Il-
linois, Minnesota and Michigan
State join the Wolverines in the field
of 64.
ROAD WOES: Michigan's loss to
Purdue was the team's fifth con-
secutive loss on the road. Since end-

ing Indiana's 50-game home win-
ning streak, the Wolverines have
not been able to came away with a
win away from Crisler. Michigan
lost the five road games by a com-
bined 56 points.
Michigan's only home loss in the
Big Ten came on Jan. 22 against
Michigan State.
BLUE MACKEY: King and Jackson
had never lost at Mackey Arena going
into yesterday's contest. The Wol-
verines have a 26-39 record in West
Lafayette.
Last season, Michigan came away
from Mackey with a one-point vic-
tory. The Boilermakers returned the
favor with a one-point win of their
own in Ann Arbor later in the year.
GONZO CUONZO: Big Ten teams
will be happy to see Purdue senior
Cuonzo Martin leave for the NBA.
The three-time captain has hit more
3-pointers than any Boilermaker in
history while tallying the highest 3-
point percentage (45 percent). He is
Purdue's 10th all-time scorer.
"At both ends of the court, Cuonzo
is the best player in the Big Ten,
maybe in the nation," Boilermaker
coach Gene Keady said.
ANOTHER MILESTONE: Jackson is
closing his career at Michigan in style.
The forward is the first Wolverine in
history to lead the team in assists (89),

............................. ,;q -law ..................

King

points (441) and rebounds (155). He
is the first frontcourt player since
Thad Garner to lead the team in
assists.
Jackson passed former teammate
Chris Webber on the Michigan all-
time scoring list yesterday. He is now
the 20th leading scorer in Wolverine
history.
Jackson ranks fifth in steals, eighth
in games played, seventh in games
started, 17th in rebounds and 10th in
assists.

Big Ten lands six in NCAA field

Team

W L

By Scott Burton
Daily Basketball Writer
Although many consider the Big Ten a second-tier con-
ference this season, its tradition of excellence apparently won
out in the eyes of the NCAA selection committee.
The Big Ten sends six teams to the NCAA Tourna-
ment, more than any other conference in the nation. The
ACC, Big Eight, Pac 10 and SEC all had five teams
selected, while the Big East sports four tournament teams.
sI think that the committee knows that Big Ten teams do
well in the tournament," senior guard Jimmy King said. "You
have to look at our style of play versus other conferences. I
think a lot of people like the Big Ten's play."
The Big Ten will quickly find out how its style of play
compares to the rest of the nation, thanks to a number of
potentially intriguing match-ups. With Minnesota receiv-

nature of this year's tourney. There is tremendous amount ::id
of parity in Division I this season, reflected in the number .
of eyebrow-raising choices made by the selection com-
mittee:
On the Bad Side of the Bubble:
There were a bounty of worthy teams on the wrong side
of the precarious bubble. George Washington - who beat
Massachusetts twice this season - cost themselves a bid
after losing to Rutgers two times late in the season.n d
Other big-name teams with dashed hopes include >
Georgia Tech, New Mexico, Texas Tech and Georgia.
N Planting the Seeds:
With no prohibitive favorite in the tourney, the NCAA
made some difficult decisions when seeding the 64 teams.
Despite Kansas's loss to Iowa State this weekend, the
Jayhawks received a No. I seed. Utah was another seeding

Purdue
Michigan St.
Michigan

15 3
14 4
A1 7

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan