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January 24, 1995 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-01-24

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 24, 1995

NOW:
v qy, Jan. Zy , 9 s

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JAPAN
Continued from page 1
of 1.5 million, and environs had
reached 5,051 dead, 106 missing and
26,284 injured. More than 56,200
buildings were destroyed or damaged
beyond use.
Although a massive cleanup has
already begun in the ravaged areas,
investors' worries about the quake's
impact on the economy struck a blow
of their own on the Tokyo Stock Ex-
change, driving the Nikkei average
down by 1,954.73 points, or 5.6 per-
cent - its biggest plunge in more
than three years. Stocks closed yes-
terday at 17,785.49.
The sharp plunge in stock values
was triggered by growing fears that
the destruction in Kobe would disrupt
Japan's economy in the short-to-me-
dium term more than had been ini-
tially expected. Recriminations in the
government's handling of the crisis
also emerged as Vice Foreign Minis-
ter Kunihiko Saito called a news con-
ference to deny that Japan had re-
jected offers of foreign assistance.
"We really wanted to accept as

many offers as possible," Saito was
quoted as saying by the electronic
Nikkei News Service. "But the most
important thing was practical assess-
ment of what kind of assistance was
really needed by victims and helpers
at the scene."
Kaifu also condemned the prime
minister "for relying on TV for his
information" and for failing to take
command of rescue operations.
Murayama acknowledged that he
heard of the Tuesday earthquake, which
struck at 5:46 a.m., on TV shortly after
6 a.m. and received his first govern-
ment report on the disaster at 7:30 a.m.
Four hours after the quake, Murayama
said, he convened his Cabinet and set
up an emergency headquarters to deal
with its aftermath.
Then, "at 4 p.m., I gave a news
conference and announced my firm
resolve to deal with the earthquake,"
Murayama said. "I took the best pos-
sible measures."
Despite his attempt at self-defense,
Murayama declared he would be will-
ing to consider strengthening the cri-
sis-management ability of the Cabi-
net that often has been criticized in
Japan's handling of foreign issues.

A ArxA

1r sw e e
1CD

Clinton to return
to call for. wage hike

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the Daily isn't just for breakfast...

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From Wire Reports
WASHINGTON - -President
Clinton took notepad in hand yester-
day toputasemifinal polish on tonight's
State of the Union address, pausing to
sign a congressional reform bill that he
praised as a step toward a "less elitist"
government.
Restating his 1992 campaign call
for a "new covenant" between a more
responsive government and a more re-
sponsible citizenry is one theme Clinton
will strike in the annual presidential
report to Congress today, aides said.
Clinton, seizing a prime-time op-
portunity to woo back voters who have
desertedtheDemocrats, also will stress
middle-class concerns including teen-
age pregnancy, border protection from
illegal immigration, health care and
lobbyists' gift-giving, an administra-
tion official said.
He has also decided to push for a
minimum wage increase despite cer-
tain opposition from the Republican
Congress, aides said yesterday.
In populist tones, Clinton yester-
day emphasized changing a "too often
disconnected" Washington culture as
he signed the first law passed by the
new Congress under the Republican
PROVOST
Continued from page 1.
and faculty groups in order to get a
better sense of what we are really;
seeking," Duderstadt said.1
The assembly members seemed
satisfied with Duderstadt's agenda.;
"I really appreciate his wanting to
include a broad range of faculty inI
this search," said Senate AssemblyI
Chair Jean Loup.
Duderstadt said that the commit-
tee will recruit for the opening from
both the University and the broader
academic community.+
"The University would be best
served if we conduct a national search.I
While I am certain there are strong
candidates internally, I think we need
to give ourselves every opportunity1
to make the selection as strong and
diverse as possible," Duderstadt said.
Loup said a nationwide search is
the appropriate method.1
"I think abroad, national search willI
DENTISTS
Continued from page 21
ties. The clinic also is listed in the
"Insider's Guide to U-M," distrib-+
uted to all students at Orientation.
"We want to provide comprehen-
sive care for the community, to attend+
to all of their dental needs," Shores;
said.
Student volunteers from the
School of Dentistry staffed the+
school's semi-annual MouthguardI
Clinic last Saturday.+
The clinic provided approximately
30 area residents with free
mouthguards.
Our main goal is to provideI
mouthguards to area kids who are+
athletes," Sheperd said. "It's so much
easier to get the mouthguard than to
try to replace teeth."l
Although the clinic has charged a
nominal fee for the mouthguards in+
past years - fees for a fitting in,

"Contract With America." The Con-
gressional Accountability Act benefits
Capitol Hill's 38,000 employees by
subjecting Congress forthe first time to
federal laws on civil rights, overtime*
pay, workplace safety and collective
bargaining.
Themeasurewill help "bringareality
check to Washington," Clinton said in an
Oval Office ceremony. "Now, we've got
to goon. We mustmakethis systemmore
open, more fair and less elitist."
Although Senate Republicans killed
the accountability act before the No-
vember election, House Republicans
included it in their contract. After Re-
publicans took over both houses, they
moved it to a passage symbolically
timed to precede Clinton's State of the
Union speech.
Amid a generally non-confronta-
tional speech tonight, aides said, Clinton
will challengeRepublicansoverthreats
by some to overturn last year's ban on
assault weapons and to de-fund his
prized AmeriCorps national service*
program. McCurry said he "wouldn't
be surprised" to see Clinton single out
young AmeriCorps volunteers seated
as his guests in the House visitors'
gallery.
result in good internal candidates look-
ing better. You see them in a new light
and you see new qualities," she said.
Senate Assembly member Charles 0
Smith said he was also pleased by
Duderstadt's remarks. "I thought the
president's comments were appropri-
ate. It's a healthy approach."
Duderstadt said he suspects that
the provost search process will not
begin until the end of winter term, or
the beginning of spring term. He added
that the committee should make the
selection by early fall.
However, Duderstadt said, "it
could not be until January, or even
somewhat later," and then there would
be discussion on "how to handle any
interim stage."
He also described the challenges
that face the University's provost.
"The role of a Provost at the Univer-
sity is one of immense importance
and one of great difficulty, particu-
larly during this period of stress in0
higher education."
private practice usually range from
$2 to $15 -.this time the program
received a substantial grant which
allows them to operate for a very low
cost. "I think we spent $50 on donuts
- that's it," Sheperd said.
The Mouthguard Clinic is just one
of the school's clinics structured*
around the philosophy that experi-
ence is the best teacher.
"The goal of the program is to
educate future dentists in the best way
possible so that they can be the best
dentists," Shores said.
On Feb. 11, the school will spon-
sor Dental Health Day. Free exams,
including screenings for cancer and
lesions, will be offered to the public.
on a walk-in basis.
"It's kind of a recruitment," said
Sheperd, who co-chaired the
Mouthguard Clinic.
"It's a great way for people who
otherwise wouldn't go (to the dentist)
to get a check-un." she C"i

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