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January 05, 1995 - Image 14

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-01-05

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6 - The Michigan Daily - SPORTSThursday - Thursday, January 5, 1995

,Jackson and King grow
into new leadership role
By RYAN WHITE
Daily Basketball Writer
Jimmy King found himself in a familiar position after Tuesday night's
game against Purdue.
Sitting in the glare of television lights, King fielded questions from the
media about his team.
There was, however, something different about this press conference.
This time it was King having to answer the tough questions. Not Chris
Webber, not Jalen Rose, not Juwan Howard. It was King's turn.
Later, in the Michigan
lockerroom, Ray Jackson would sit
with reporters circled around him
OU RT responding to the same questions.
It may not seem like much. After
* all, King and Jackson are the team's
E seniors and captains. But it's a good
sign. It's an indicator that the two are
growing into their leadership roles.
Too often this season King and
Jackson have been among the first out of the lockerroom, leaving the
underclassmen to answer questions about why the team was faltering.
The best sign, however, has been the pair's play on the court as of late.
Against Purdue, King scored 18 points on 6-of-10 shooting; Jackson finished
with 12 points and shut down the Boilermakers' top scorer, Cuonzo Martin.
Against Portland Dec. 29 at the U.S. West Cellular Air Time Tournament in
Seattle, King and Jackson hit late, back-to-back three-pointers to bring Michigan
back and help force overtime. King finished the game with 20, Jackson with 23.
Even in the Wolverines' disappointing loss to Washington, the low point
of the season thus far, the two took charge for Michigan.
"We've shown (the on-court leadership) in spurts," Jackson said. "As
captains we just have to be more consistent."
Before the Wolverines left for Seattle, King went home to Plano, Texas to try
to find some of the missing consistency. What he got was advice from his father.
What did the elder King say to his son?
"Just shoot (the ball)," Jimmy said.
King was told that he was doing too much second guessing, and hesitating
on his shot. All he really needed to do was shoot the ball.
King also got another piece of advice, have a team meeting. He did so right
after Michigan lost to Washington on Dec. 30. No coaches,just King, Jackson
and the rest of the players.
The meeting may turn out to be what turns around the Wolverines' season.
"We laughed, and cracked jokes, and came together as a team," Jackson
said. "But we also got some things accomplished."
Among other things, King and Jackson impressed on the younger players
what it takes to win at the collegiate level.
Michigan responded by playing easily its best game of the season against
Purdue. The Wolverines' 15 assists was their second highest total of the
season. And the defense, which hasn't been bad, shut down the Boilermakers
and sparked the Wolverines to a 15-point lead in the second half.
Furthermore, over the past three games, when Michigan has needed a
basket, King or Jackson have been able to get one. That's going to be
important as Michigan enters its "second season" - the Big Ten schedule.
The Wolverines went 6-5 in their non-conference games, and if they are going
to make it to what they consider the "third season," the NCAA tournament, they
will probably have to finish the season by going at least 12-6 in the Big Ten.
"The first (part of the season) was average at best," King said. "For us to
get to the NCAA tournament we're going to have to play better."
And King and Jackson are going to have to play every game like they have the
last three.
The two have been through the Big Ten wars three times already and are
still looking for their first conference crown - a goal they have been talking
about since the beginning of the season.
So, has their recent success been more what King and Jackson had been
hoping for this season?
"It is the least we expected," King said. "The past three games have been
all right - but it can only get better."
If it does, King and Jackson will again find themselves in the media
spotlight of another NCAA tournament.

Michigan drops two in.
difficult holiday break

By ANTOINE PITTS
Daily Basketball Writer
Just when the Michigan basketball
team thought things couldn't get any
worse, they didoverthesemesterbreak.
First, the Wolverines fell on Dec.
13 to Pennsylvania, 62-60. The loss
knocked Michigan out of the top 25 for
the first time since the 1990-91 season.
A week later, after taking final ex-
ams, the Wolverines struggled to get by
Jackson State, 87-81. Anyone who
thought those games werebad was about
to get a shock. Things got dramtically
worse last week at the U.S. West Cellu-
lar Air Time Tournament in Seattle.
The Wolverines had to go over-
time to get by Portland of the West
Coast Conference, 88-84. The next
night, Michigan fell to Washington,
65-61. The Huskies were playing on
their home floor at the Hec
Edmundson Pavillion, but they have
been picked by many to finish in the
cellar of the Pac 10.
The lackluster play that finished
off the non-conference portion of
Michigan's schedule droppedtheWol-
verines to 6-5. It was time toput an end
to it and seniors Jimmy King and Ray
Jackson knew one way to start.
Following the Washington game,
in which the Huskies shot 35 percent
but still won the game, the Wolverines
had aplayers-only meeting back at the
hotel in Seattle.
"It was a positive meeting," Jack-
son said. "It was something we just had
to do to get everybody's head up:"
The Wolverines sat in that hotel
room and discussed some of the things
that have been troubling the team so

far this season.
"We felt we were getting outplayed
every time out," Jackson said. "We
need to bring the physical and mental
toughness to the table every night."
Michigan did have afew highlight
in the tournament, but the 55 turn-
overs it committed in the two games
overshadowed them. King put to-
gether consecutive 20-point games,
and Jackson scored 23 against Port-
land. King and Jackson made the all-
tournament team.
MICHIAN (61)
UN *AM*A 0-T A FP4
Mitchell 13 0.1 00 01 0 0 C)0
Jackson 26 3.6 3.4 140 5 9
Taylor 29 6412 0.0 2-9 1 3 12
Fife 20 0-2 040 03 13 0
King 34 7411 5-6 06 1 2 20
Ndiaye 20 4.8 1- 4-603 , 9
Baston 17 3-5 0.1 2-4 0 "3 6
Ward 18 1-2 2-2 0.6 1 1 5
Crawford 13 0-2 0G0 1-1 1 3 0
Conlan 10 0.2 0-0 0-0 1 1 ,e0
Totals 200 2451 1114 1043 6 24 61
FG%: .471, FT%: .786. Three-point goals:2-7 .286
(King 1-2, Ward 1-2, Crawford 0.1, Fife 0-2) Bloc v4
(Baston, Ndiaye, Taylor. Ward)). Turnovers: 26 (King 7.
Fife 3. Jackson 3, Ndiaye 3, Ward 3, Mitchell 2, Taylor
2, Baston, Conlan, Crawford). Steals: 5 (Crawford 2.
Conlan, Ndiaye, Ward). Technlcal Fouls: none.c
WASHINGTON (65)
Fe FT an
U -A U*A OT AFPiO
Sanford 29 5-12 1-2 3.5 3 4 -,13
Amos 20 0-1 0-1 032 0 0
McClain 30 2-5 3 4 0-1 3 1 8
Hamilton 35 2-10 5.6 2-5 4 1 11
Boston 34 9-23 3.5 3-4 0 2 21
Hawken 21 2-4 44 0012 8
Bergersen 6 0-0 2-2 0-0 2 0 2
Hartman 11 1-3 00 00 0 1 2
Booker 12 0.1 M0-0 03 1 0 0
Lopez 2 0-1 0-0 1-1 0 1 .,0
Totals 200 21.60 1.24 10.25 1612 _6
FG%:.350. FT% .750. Three-point goals: 5-12.41
(Sanford 2-4, McClain i-3, Hamilton 2-3, Boston -
Hartman 0.1). Blocks: 3 (Sanford 2. Boston).
Turnovers: 9 (Boston 2, Hawken 2, McClain 2, Booke.
Hamilton, Sanford) Steals; 9 (Booker 2, Hamilton 2,
Hawken 2. Sanford 2, Boston) Techn cal Fouls: non
MNch .an..29 32 - 61
Washington....26 39 - 65
At: Edmundson Pavillion, Seattle A: 6.123.

JONATHAN LURIE/Daily
Wolverines Willie Mitchell, Jerod Ward and Maceo Baston battle with a
Portland player for the ball in Michigan's 88-84 overtime victory over the Pilots.

Ndiaye posts big gaies -
Center improves his play in recent contests

By SCOTT BURTON
Daily Basketball Writer
Although Makhtar Ndiaye's de-
but as a Wolverine last year was highly
anticipated, the early returns were
less than stellar.
His defensive play was marred by
lots of silly fouls. He provided little
more than put-backs and chippies of-
fensively. And for a man standing 6-
foot-9, his 2.2 rebounding average
was modest at best.
But after Michigan's victory over
Purdue Tuesday night, senior captain
Jimmy King called Ndiaye the team's
best rebounder, coach Steve Fisher
praised his game and Ndiaye had one
huge smile on his face.
Why? Because Ndiaye finally pro-
vided the strong low-post play the
Wolverines are so dearly counting
upon. Although he played only 19
minutes against the Boilermakers, he
scored 10 points and grabbed nine
rebounds with one blocked shot.
This improved play followed an
impressive performance at the U.S.
West Cellular Air Time Tournament.
He scored 19 points in two games,
with three blocks and 11 rebounds.
"What you saw tonight (against
Purdue) is what I am expecting from

Makhtar," Fisher said. "He is not go-
ing to be a 20-point scorer, but he
gives us toughness inside. He'splayed
exceptional both ends of the floor."
Ndiaye has been Michigan's most
dependable low-post defender and
rebounder this season, despite con-
tinued foul problems. But what has
caught Fisher's attention even more
is Ndiaye's improved, albeit, unpol-
ished offensive repertoire.
"He is just a baby. He is just a
little kid learning how to crawl,"
Fisher said. "If he stays with it, he
can turn himself into a pretty good
basketball player."
"It just comes naturally," Ndiaye
said. "In practice, my teammates
keep telling me, 'Shoot, shoot,
shoot.' Now I am comfortable do-
ing it in the game."
The sight of Ndiaye lining up for
17-foot jumpers - as he did twice
Tuesday - may not be exactly what
Fisher is looking for. But as long as he
hits them, which he did against Purdue,
Fisher will reserve criticism.
"He is a decent 15-foot perimeter
shooter when he is not guarded,"
Fisher said. "He made one tonight
that I didn't want him to shoot. But he
can make that shot."

Here is the latest AP Top 25 basketball poll.

Team
1. North Carolina
2., UCLA
3. Arkansas
4. Massachusetts
5. Kansas
6. Connecticut
7. Maryland
8. Kentucky
9. Arizona
IO.Syracuse
11.Duke
12.Georgetown

Record
9-0
6-0
11-1
5-1
8-1
7-0
10-2
6-2
9-2
8-1
8-2
7-1

Pvs.
1
2
3
4 -
6
8
9
5
10
11
7
12

Team
13. Florida
14. Michigan St.
15. Arizona St.
16. Iowa St.
17. California
18. Wake Forest
19. Nebraska
20. New Mexico St.
21. Indiana
22. Iowa
23. Stanford
24. Georgia Tech
25. Pennsylvania

Record
6-2
7-1
9-2
10-1
7-1
7-1
11-1
9-2
8-4
10-2
9-0
8-3
6-1

Pvs.
13
15
16
21
14
18
23
22
24
17

JONA"N'"U
Makhtar Ndiaye has moved back into Michigan's starting lineup.

L

Forward
By RYAN WH
Daily Basketball W
Oh, how things change.
On Nov. 21 Olivier Saint
bench and scored 13 points tot
basketball team over Tulane in 1
Maui Classic. On Dec. 20, Wo
Fisher announced that Saint-Je
to San Jose State.
"The decision to leave Mi
easy one for Olivier, but this i
was best for him," Fisher said.'
him go, but certainly wish him
the way in his endeavors."

Saint-Jean says goodbye to
ITE Saint-Jean, a 6-foot-7 sophomore forward, had play, when y
riter spent most of this season recovering from off- was playing
season knee surgery to remove bone spurs. without pra
-Jean came off the Aside from his 13 minutes against Tulane, he Fisher sa
boost the Michigan had played in Maui games against Utah and Arizona into staying,,
the first round of the State. Saint-Jean also played seven minutes against a medical re
lverine coach Steve Arizona at the Palace of Auburn Hills in November. "I tried to
an was transferring Saint-Jean may have felt threatened by the (at Michiga
Wolverines' five freshmen, and as a result decided not to go mi
chigan was not an to go to another school where he would get more start somew
s something he felt playing time. Lastseas
"We are sorry to see Fisher, however, hoped that playing time wasn't 3.6 points p
success the rest of a factor in Saint-Jean's decision. first career
"How can you know how much you're going to against Mic

Wolverines

you don't practice?" Fisher asked. "If it
time, then it was a conclusion drawn
cticing."
aid that he attempted to talk Saint-Jean
and Michigan was attempting to get hip*
dshirt for the remainder of the season.
o say that the best thing to do was to stay
n)," Fisher said. "And if he did go -
d-year when it becomes much harder to
here new."
son, as a freshman, Saint-Jean averaged
er game. His season best came in his
start on Feb. 5 when he scored 11
higan State.
wanted to put that Washington gams
behind us."
The Wolverines play their first
conference road game Sunday after-
noon at Penn State.

PURDUE
Continued from page 1
Wolverine to score in double fig-
ures in every game this season. "We
had excellent team defense. We've
been trying to put it together all
season.
"We beat agood Purdue team. We
can't rest on this one, though."
A win in the first conference game
gave the Wolverines a chance to shed
some of the frustration that has domi-

nated their early season play.
"We're tired of losing," Taylor said.
We have to come out and play hard to
win in the Big Ten."
Purdue opened up a 14-7 lead six
minutes into the game. Seven of those
points came from one player-on the
same possesion. Waddell hit two tech-
nical free throws followed by two more
free throws. On the ensuing inbound,
Waddell hit a 3-pointer to finish off
the possesion.
The Wolverines went on a 14-6 run
to even things up. The teams traded

baskets to go into the half tied at 33.
Michigan then went to work in the
second half.
"You always get confidence with a
win," King .said. "We definitely

i

Pub E(61)
MNMA A lO.TAF PM
Hairston 22 59 1-5 1.3 1 2 11
Martin 33 311 4-5 0131 13
Brantley 30 2-9 3-4 4-8 1 5 7
Roberts 29 2-7 0-1 38 4 2 4
Austin 15 16 0 1-3 1 1 3
Jennings 14 4-8 0.2 460 2 8
Wadden 26 2-9 4-5 02 2 1 10
Dove 7 00 00 1-1 02 0
Foster 12 0-2 0-0 0-3 03 4
Minler 12 2-2 (}0 -a20 3 4
Totals 200 21683 13.24 19.43 1220 61
FG%: .333. FI%: .542. Threepoint goals: 6.22. .273
(Waddell 2-3, Austin 1-3, Martin 3-10, Foster 0-2, Hairston
0-2, Roberts 0-2). Blocks: 2(Brantley, Hairston).Turnoves:
1 r .airt .. at w U3.Robrts 3 Austin .v .

WWHW6AN (71)
Ia Oa A F PTS
Jacks1 35 59 0610633 2 12
Taylor 32 8.14 1-2 2-7 0 4 18
Ndiaye 19 4-7 2-3 4-9 1 4 10
King 376-10 56 16 4 1 18
Fife 24 0-2 2-2 16 55 2
Crawford 19 1-5 2 0 114
Baston 8 0.1 1-2 1-4 00 1
Ward 15 1-4 2-2 14 10 4
Mitchell 10 1-4 1-2 01' 0 3 4
Conlan 1 GO GO GO 0 0 0
Tots 200 26-56 14-20 1142 1523 71
FG%: .464. FM%:.700. Three-pontgoals: 5-14.357 (Tay
Ior 1, Jackson 24, Mitchell 1-2, King 13, Fife 1, Crawford
0-3). Blocks: 4 (Jackson, Ndiaye, Taylor, Ward). Turnovers:
14 (Jackson 5. Taylor 4, Baston 3, Fife, King). Steals: 3

1 _ 1

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