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January 13, 1995 - Image 14

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-01-13

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14 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 13, 1995

Players start training camp as hockey begins

NEW YORK (AP) - NHL play-
ers, still concerned with the "loose
ends" of their labor agreement, re-
viewed the settlement yesterday be-
fore voting on the contract recom-
mended by their bargaining commit-
tee.
Player representatives say theown-
ers' proposal will be ratified, but not
overwhelmingly.
The NHL Players Association
scheduled a conference call with its
player representatives yesterday. It
was not immediately clear when the
actual vote would take place.
"We want to make sure all the
players are well informed," said Larry
Murphy, player representative of the
Pittsburgh Penguins.
The players will hold a secret vote,
official announcement of which pre-
sumably will be made today. A ma-
jority vote is needed for approval.
An NHL spokesman said it was
hoped commissionerGary Bettman and
union head Bob Goodenow will hold a
joint news conference in New York,
but not before the results of the vote is
known.
Murphy said this vote is more en-
LAKE STATE
Continued from page 12
and eight assists.
"Their stats are not as impressive as
you would expect from a Lake Supe-
rior team," Berenson said. "But they
always match up against us because
they play a very positive, defensive
game against Michigan."
Defense is the Lakers' forte. They
lead the league in penalty killing as
opponentshave capitalized on less than
15 percent of their power-play oppor-
tunities. They also boast a capable tag-
team of goalies in sophomore Sean
Kul ick (5-3-1, 2.90goals-againstaver-
age) and freshman John Grahame (2-3-
2,3.54).
For the first time since Mike Knuble
missed the first four games of the sea-
son with a chest infection, the injury
bug has badly infected the Wolverines.
Center Ron Sacka (groin), right
wing Jason Botterill (back) and left
wing Rick Willis (shoulder) sustained
injuries last Saturday against Team
Canada. Sacka is listed as doubtful for
tonight and tomorrow while Botterill
and Willis are both probable.
"Ifwe havepeople like Willis, Sacka
and Botterill out of the lineup, we're
not the same team," Berenson said.
"We need to have everyone on the ice
against a team like Lake Superior."

compassing than the one that settled
the 10-day strike in 1992.
"This won't be a walk in the park
like it was then," he said.
While Murphy doesn't expect a
ringing endorsement, he was confident
the deal will be ratified by the rank-
and-file, ending the 103-day lockout.
"It's not the deal we had hoped
for," Murphy said. "We made many
concessions, but the deal turned out to
be fair and reasonable."
It is, though, more complicated than
the players first thought.
"There was an initial reaction of
relief, that was it - we had a deal,"
said Randy Ladouceur, captain of the
Anaheim Mighty Ducks. "But then
you realize that they've been bargain-
ing forthree months. There's a lot more
loose ends than I thought."
It was obvious how Murphy would
vote.
"I have full faith in our negotiat-
ing committee," he said. "I believe in
backing the committee."
So did Ladouceur.
"I think as long as it's recom-
mended by Bob, I think it will pass,"
he said. "I'm pretty optimistic."

It's possible not all of the some
700 NHL players will vote. Some
may still be in Europe, where they
have been playing.
"If there seems to be a vast major-
ity of guys that ratify it, they may not
get everybody in," Ladouceur said.
The agreement was worked out
during three days of negotiating this
week involving Goodenow and
Bettman.
"It was tough fight," Murphy said.
"But it was a package that we can live
with."
Many teams expect to start training
camp this weekend, some as early as
Friday. Bettman said a48-game season
would start by the end of next week,
presumably the following Friday.
Players stepped up informal prac-
tices in anticipation of getting back to
serious competition.
The Boston Bruins were typical.
Sixteen skaters and one goalie,
Vincent Riendeau, took part in an
80-minute workout in Wilmington,
Mass., site of their original training
camp in September.
"I can only speak for the guys on
our team but they've kept them-

Goodenow

selves in great shape," left wing Ted
Donato said. "Everybody's been
skating, everybody's been working
out."
Some players will be in better
shape than others.
"The NHLerg who played in Eu-
rope will probably have a big ad-
vantage in the beginning of the NHL
season when it comes to condition-
ing," said Quebec's Peter Forsberg,
who returned to his Swedish club
during the lockout.

UULASANE/ai l
Michigan came up with nine blocks in its victory over Iowa Wednesday,
including two by Maceo Baston (middle). The Wolverines battle Northwestern

tomorrow night at 8 p.m. in Evanston.
'CATS
Continued from page 12
Chamberlain and senior Cedric
Neloms. Chamberlein averages more
than nine points per game and leads
Northwestern with eight rebounds
per game.
Neloms is the Wildcats' leading
scorer with more than 13 points per
game.
The low point for the Wildcats
was an 80-48 loss to Western Illi-
nois. Northwestern is currently in
the midst ofa five-game losing streak
and is tied with Ohio State for last
place in the Big Ten..
Northwestern's strength is its

BIG TEN WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TA HOOPS
Games through Jan. 10 Continued from page 13
ponent.
CONFERENCE OVERALL Roberts said Michigan needs to
TEAM W L W L show improvement in several areas,
W c s12including low-post play and weak-
Wisconsin 4 0 11 2side defense. The Wolverines'
Minnesota 3 0 8 5 Achilles' heel at the point guard
Indiana 2 1 12 1 position may have been cured by
Iowa....1 6 7 the emergence of freshman Akisha
Franklin. Franklin sparkled against
Ohio State 2 2 8 5 Michigan State and Northwestern
Michigan 2 2 7 7 with 26 points and 13 assists in the
Penn State 1 2 9 3 twin victories.
Roberts said last weekend's pair
Purdue 1 2 9 5 .of wins was the confidence booster
Northwestern 1 2 7 6 her team needed. "It makes a huge
Illinois 0 3 7 6 difference. (The players) believe
Mihin State 0 3 6 6they can win now. We got a monkey
off our back."
Despite their injuries, the Lady
Lions are a tough opponent.
Gamesfor Jan. 13. Games for Jtan. 15 "Penn State is a strong team,"
Roberts cautioned. "Last weekend
l linois at Indiana Michigan at Penn St. was great, but this is a I1te iest to
Iowa at Purdue Indiana at Purdue see whcrc we are.-
Minnesota at Ohio St. Iowa at Michigan St.
N'western at Penn St. Minnesota at Illinois TANKERS

team defense. Illinois was the first
team to shoot better than 50 percent
against Byrdsong's squad.
A Wolverine victory tomorrow,
coupled with a Fighting Illini vic-
tory at home against Indiana, would
set up a very important Big Ten
battle Tuesday. Illinois is alone in
first place in the conference with a
3-0 record.
"We have to think of the next
two games as ordinary games,"
Taylor said. "If we play our game
and stay focused we can come away
with two wins against two good
teams."
Tomorrow's game will be tele-
vised locally by Raycom at 8 p.m.

STANFORD

Continued from page 12
them the psychological edge for
NCAAs.
"I think they're going to rest a
little, but we haven't."
Urbanchek pointed out another
talented freshman in Owen von
Richter, who has not gotten the same
publicity as many of this already
proven teammates.
"He's so versatile, we can put
him anywhere," Urbanchek said.

"He's aCanadian all-purpose handy-
man." Other freshmen to look for in
upcoming years and at this
weekend's meets include:
Buyukuncu, butterflyers Jason
Lancaster and Chris Laskowski,
backstroker Raymond Papa and
distancer Steven Williams.
The Cardinal and the Golden
Bears are the last remaining real
competitors for the Wolverines, who
have only two meets left after this
weekend before the Big Ten meet.

Continued from page 12
other team in the country," Gillam
said. "Their level of talent and inten-
sity combined is a step above every
other school."
But she is not skeptical about the
Wolverines' chances Saturday.
"I don't think they're unbeatable,"
Gillam said. "If they think it's easy,
they'll bereally surprised. We're very
ready to meet them."
Michigan races a tough, well pre-
pared California team Sunday. The
Golden Bears are led by All-Ameri-
can tri-captain Anna Simcic. Simcic
swam the 200 backstroke for New
Zealand in the '92 Olympics and cur-
rently maintains the school record in
the event (1:56.70). Assisting Simcic
are tri-captains Larissa Herold and
Sheila Conway. Herold is the two-
time defending team MVP and
Conway remains one of the team's
best all-around swimmers.

a

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I,

SOPHOMORES...
Did you get it?
CP&P mailed to all sophomores this wee]

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16AW -_______T TJM, .F A -

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