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November 28, 1994 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-11-28

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 28, 1994 - 13

Whistles abound
for Badgers, Blue
By DARREN EVERSON
Daily Hockey Writer
ST. PAUL, Minn. - Maco Balkovec skated off the
ice, once again, to take a seat with his teammates. No, the
Badger defenseman wasn't coming out because he was
red or hurt or due for a line change.
Balkovec was just one of many players forced to make
the long, slow skate to the penalty box in Friday's game.
Officials from the Western Collegiate Hockey Asso-
ciation (WCHA) whistled 42 penalties in all, including 38
minutes worth in the second period alone.
All those calls meant a lot of people spent a lot of time
in the sin bin, and fortunately for Michigan, a lot of them
were Badgers.
"That's the most penalties we've taken in a game,"
Wisconsin coach Jeff Sauer said. "We showed how we
lan play, but penalties took us out of the game."
The coach may have been right. The more officials got
involved, the more Wisconsin suffered. Michigan's power-
play units, however, did not. With Wisconsin down a man
and leading, 2-1, in the second period, Mike Knuble tied
the game by putting away his own rebounded shot.
After Knuble put Michigan ahead with an even-strength
score, a Jason Botterill shot ricocheted off the post and
past Wisconsin goalie Kirk Daubenspeck. The goal came
on the power play, as did Mike Legg's score from the left
iceoff circle late in the second period.
'We showed how we can play, but
penalties took us out of the game.'
- Jeff Sauer
Wisconsin hockey coach
With 20 minutes left in the contest, the three man-
advantage goals had pretty much buried the Badgers. The
lolverines, in fact, could have had a fourth, but Legg's
would-be score was disallowed because Michigan had a
man in the goal crease.
"It's frustrating, because we haven't been playing that
this season " Sauer said. "It's also the tightest we've
season, and ,-orked to stir. -i
=lied to su-
cd the eve i - p( )od.
Sevl.t, 'lied the peni t,.ed second
Bess to a) Ii tIgan coach Red Berenson didn't
ute see it that way.
"I don't know if it was called tight," Berenson said. "I
don't want to get into the officiating; their job is tough
enough. I just think the blatant ones should be called."
The officials did manage to call those as well. Michi-
gan forward Warren Luhning and Wisconsin defenseman
Mike Strobel were each ejected from the game for fight-
,,ing in the third period, meaning both were disqualified
from their respective teams' next game.
Still, those calls came when the game was already
*ecided. Regardless of whether the game was called too
tight, the Wisconsin coach seems to have learned his
lesson.
"The best way to kill power plays is to stay out of the
box." Sauer said-

College hockey not yet
ready for Showcase
By DARREN EVERSON
Daily Hockey Writer
ST. PAUL, Minn.-With the Wolverines' loss to Minnesota last Saturday,
another College Hockey Showcase has come and gone, so it's time to judge
just how it went.
The fact that Michigan and Michigan State split with the Western Colle-
giate Hockey Association (WCHA) leaders, Wisconsin and Minnesota, isn't
what matters. The purpose of the event is to expand the visibility and
popularity of college hockey by pitting top teams against each other in a
populated, urban area - hence the title "Showcase".
But has its time really come?
The Wolverines and the Golden Gophers played in front of a crowd of
15,078 at St. Paul's Civic Center, just minutes away from the Minnesota
campus. A few hours earlier, though, the Badgers and Spartans performed for
nearly no one, and the Wisconsin-Michigan contest the day before went the
same way.
What all of that means is that people are willing to come out and see their
hometown team play; there just aren't a whole lot of them who have embraced
the sport as a whole. In college football and basketball, teams playing in neutral
sites are quite capable of attracting strong crowds, but college hockey hasn't
reached that point yet.
That being the case, the format of events like the Showcase needs to be
changed. Wisconsin coach Jeff Sauer, for one, doesn't mind the current setup.
"It's much more interesting to prepare to prepare to play (Michigan and
Michigan State) than, say, Minnesota," he said. "I don't ever want to see this
become a tournament."
Sauer has a point - his Badgers already see Minnesota four times a year.
But the success of the Great Lakes Inviational, hosted every season by
Michigan, Michigan State and Michigan Tech, cannot be ignored.
Each year, these three teams invite another (Cornell this year) to a two-day
tournament at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit. The tournament has drawn impres-
sively in recent years. Much of the reason for that success is because both
Michigan and Michigan State fans live nearby the site.
Minnesota and Wisconsin aren't so lucky in that respect, but both cam-
puses are near major metropolitan areas. Teams with good fan support like
d play a regular season game or two at an urban arena. Whenthe
feed Michigan State last February at Joe Louis Arena, over
JP
hose a t he key to broadening college hockey's appeal. It's
,et says fi tikes the current setup, because the game just isn't
it yet.

TONYA BROAD/Daily
Officials from the Western Collegiate Hockey Association had a significant impact on Friday's
Michigan-Wisconsin game. The Wolverines scored four power-play goals during the contest.

SHOWCASE
Continued from page 10
what hurt us."
Amidst all of the penalties, the Wolver-
FR IDAY'SGA
MICHIGAN 7, WISCONSIN 2
Wisconsin20-
Michigan . 1 4 2-7
FW4, - i "nule (Morri tri v"-- =2b 2 uW
an )ijfl*
l',f -oierle ri e x , .
7, UM, Legg 5 (butterii. lmto, ; 3 U
(hooking),2:35;Raygor UW(interterence) .0i"1~o cmnarg
ing), 6:27; Sloan,.UM (tpping), 8:35, Knuoie U' oouoIt ougning)
11:48; Balkovic, UW (double roughing),11.48. RatawsKI.uw roug
ing), 11:48; Botterill, UM (holding), 12:12; Tok, UW (slashing)
12:12; Tok, UW (slashing), 16:13; Gordon, UM (double roughing)
19:03; Muckalt, UM (roughing), 19:03; Elick, UW (double roughing)
19:03; Enrico, UW (double roughing), 19:03.
Third Pedod-8, UM, Botterill 8 (Luhning), 2:52.9, UM, Morris
9 (Knuble, Eotterill),19:47. Penalties-Luhning, UM (holding, sere
by Herr, fighting, game disqualification), 5:54; Strobel, UW (holding
served by Smith, fighting, game disqualification), 5:54; Herr, U
(roughing), 8:03; Balkovic, UW (roughing), 8:03; knuble, UM (cross
checking), 13:11; Bianchi, UW(high-sticking),16:51;Elick,LUW(cross
checking), 17:54.
Shots on goei- UW 185&7-33. UM 9-1512-36.
Power pk"y - UW 1 of 5, UM 4 of 9.
Goae saes-UW, Daubenspeck 811-10-29. UM,.Turco 1
7-31.
ferees- Chick Yachel, Gregg Shepard.
Unemn-Jon campion.
At: St. Paul Civic Center. A- 15,001.

ines put together their strongest two periods
of play all weekend. Robb Gordon, Mike
Legg and Knuble each scored on power plays
in the second period. Meanwhile, Michigan
shut out Wisconsin the rest of the way, limit-
ing the Badgers to only 15 more shots.
In the other two Showcase games, Michi-
gan State lost to Minnesota, 3-2, on Friday
and def} f #consin, 3-2 )n Saturday.
ac
~',\ Nnign
3, Frescoinr
x KituO- ,King), 13:57,
t cng), 19.15.
3, UM, Hilton 6 (unassisted), 1:32. 4,
M, Knuoie 9 Legg, Morrison), 17:34 (pp). Penalties - Bell,
N (high-sticking), 3:39; Sloan, UM (high-sticking), 3:39;
inclair, UM (interference), 10:38; Fiebelkorn, MN (slashing),
3:51; Crowley, MN (cross-checking), 17:04; Schock, UM
interference), 18:46.
Third Period - 5, MN, Tribel 3 (Woog), 7:17. 6, MN, Kraft
(unassisted), 11:31. 7, MN, Bonin 11 (crowley, Callinan),
6:10. Penalties - Godbout, MN (roughing), 15:48; Gordon,
M (slashing), 15:48.
Shots on goal - UM 11-9-5-25. MN 16-11-7-34.
Power plays - UM 1 of 3, MN 0 of 4.
Goalle saves- UM, Turco 15-11-4-30. MNCallinan 10-
-5-22.
Referees -Greg Shepherd, Mike Schmitt.
Unesman - Jon Campion.
At: St. Paul Civic Center. A: 15,078.

WO EN
Continued from page 10
erts said.
Michigan's squad features seven
freshmen, with no seniors and only
one junior. Given that mix, Roberts
expects some mistakes.
"Our last five minutes I was not
pleased with. We made crucial er-
rors," Roberts said. "But we're off to
a good start."
The Wolverines can't be too opti-
mistic, though, if they remember last
season. Michigan started the season
the same way - splitting its first two
ga.m-es - and finished with a 3.24
ovefa ,ecord.
Saturday's championship game
gave the Wolverines the opportunity
to have their first two-game winning
streak since the 1991-92 season. We-
ber State (2-0) pushed out to an early
8-0 lead.
The Wolverines got on the board
when Murray hit a short jumper at the
14.32 mark.
Michigan fell behind by as many
as 12 points in the first half. The
Wolverines cut the lead to 22-19 with
a 9-0 spurt, sparked by Semelda
Elverton's three-point play.
The Wildcats countered with an
8-0 run of their own to stretch the
lead back to 11. Weber State went to
the lockerroom with a 37-29 half-
time lead.
Michigan came out strong in the

'The difference in our
team (this year) is
depth - I look down
the bench and I
actually see faces.'
- Trish Roberts
women 's basketball
coach
second hall ad ied the score at 44 on
a Murray jumper with 14.35 remain-
ing. The W(ilverines then scorched
the Wi Idcats with an 18-4 run to take
a 14-point advantage with nine min-
utes left.
Fourteen points was not a big
enough cushion, because Weber State
roared back with 15 unanswered
points of its own.
After that, Michigan could not
mount another comeback and let the
Wildcats take the Cyclone Classic
title back to Ogden, Utah.
"We beat ourselves tonight. Our
inexperience showed against Weber
State," Roberts said. "We (the
coaches) did not prepare them as well
for the second game."
The Wolverines hit the road this
week, with games at Illinois-Chi-
cago Tuesday, at South Carolina
Thursday and at Georgia State Sat-
urday.

MICHIGAN (75)
FG FT REB,
M-A M-A 0-T A F PTS
Murray 4-6 1-2 1-2 4 4 9
Franklin 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Elverton 0-4 0-0 2-2 2 1 0
Ross 1-2 3-4 1-1 1 3 5
DuBois 0-0 0.0 0-0 0 0 0
Johnson 7-13 3-3 0-5 4 1 18
Johns 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Brzezinski 5-6 1-2 1-11 0 4 11
Shellman 5-15 3-3 3-8 6 3 13
Willard 5-14 3-8 4-9 0 2 13
DiGiacinto 3-8 0-0 2-10 1 4 6
Totals 3069 12-22 14-53 18 22 75
FG%: .434. FT%: .636. Three-point goals: 1-6,
167 (Johnson 1-1, Shellman 0-3, Elverton 0-1,
Willard 0.1). Blocks: 5 (Brzezinski 3, Murray,
Willard). Turnovers: 25 (Brzezinski 6, Johnson 5,
Willard 4, Ross 3, Franklin 2, Murray 2, Shellman
2, Elverton). Steals: 15 (Shellman 5, Willard 3,
Johnson 2, Murray 2, Brzezinski, Elverton,
Franklin). Technical Fouls: none.

GEORGETOWN (62)
FQ FfRE8
W-A UWA O-T
Galon 2.4 3-4 1-2
Penoerghast4-12 2-4 1-6
LaForce 0-1 0-2 0-1
Williams 1-3 2-3 0.1
O)eSniayes 0-0 0-0 0-0
' nranan 4-7 0-0 0-0
acoosen 3-8 0-1 2-9
Cooke 6-11 1-1 4-7
Anonkhai 3-8 2-5 0-3
Nixon 0-1 2-2 0-1
Staier 0-0 0-0 14
Totals 23-81 12.22 9-34

MICHIGAN (68)
FG FitRES
U-A M-A OT AF PTS
Murray 5-11 2-2 2-6 1.3 12
Elverton 4.8 4-5 2-3 3 1 13
Ross 1-3 1-3 0-1 1 3 3
Johnson 5-16 34 4-7 4 4 15
Johns 1-3 0-3 3-7 1 5 2
Brzezinski 5-11 3-4 3-11 2 2 13
She lman 2-7 0-1 2-3 0 2 4
Willard 2-7 0-0 5.8 0 4 4
DiGiacinto 1-4 0-0 1-2 1 4 2
Totals 26-70 13-2222-48 13 28 68
FG%: .371. FT%9 .590. Three-pit goals: 3-12,
.250 (Johnson 2-5, Elverton 1-4, Murray 0-2,
Ross 0-1). Blocks: 4 (Johns 2, Murray, Willard).
Turnovers: 17 (Brzezinski 4, Murray 4, Johns 2,
Willard 2, DiGacinto, Elverton, Johnson, Ross,
Sheliman). Steals: 9 (Brzezinski 6, Elverton 3).
Technical Fouls: none.
WEBER STATE (77)
F8 FTIES
M-A M4A T AF PM
Allen 1-1 1-2 0-0 0 1 3
Martin 0-0 0-0 0-4 6 3 0
Gardner 5.13 0-1 2-4 4 1 13
Brown 5-12 0-0 1-5 0 2 10
Wangsgard14-9 5- 34 11 4
Sorenson 1-2 0-1 2-7 5 4 2
Paulsen 2-3 2-3 4-4 2 1 7
Davis 0-0 0-0 0-1 1 0 0
Friend 0-2 0-0 1-1 0 2 0
Berg 7-14 8-14 3-11 2 4 22
Wimmer 1-3 4-7 2-3 1 1 6
Totals 26-59 2034 18-47 22 20 77
FG%: .441. FT%: .588. Three-point goals: 5-11,
.455 (Gardner 3-7, Wangsgard 1-3, Paulsen 1-1).
Blocks: 3 (Berg, Gardner, Wimmer). Turnovers:
18 (Brown 3, Gardner 3, Martin 3, Paulsen 2,
Sorenson 2, Allen, Berg, Davis, Wangsgard,
Wimmer). Steals: 8 (Berg 2, Wangsgard 2,
Wimmer 2, Gardner, Sorenson). Technical Fouls:
none.
Michigan. 29 39 - 68
Weber State.237 40 - 77
At: Hilton Coliseum; A: 212.

A
1
3
0
4
0
2
1
0
0
0
2
13

F
3
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
4
0
3
14

P1
8
11
0
4
0
10
6
13
8
2
0
62

FG%: .377. FT%:.545. Three-point goals: 4-16,
.250 (Hanrahan 2-8, Penderghast 1-5, Gallon 1-
2, Williams 0-1). Blocks: 3 (LaForce 2, Staler).
Turnovers: 27 (Hanrahan 6, Ahonkhal 5, Gallon
5, Williams 4, Cooke 2, Penderghast 2,
DeShayes, Jacobson, Staler). Steals: 10
(Williams 3, Ahonkhai 2, Penderghast 2, Gallon,
Hanrahan, Staier). Technical Fouls: none.
Michigan.......40 35 - 75
Georgetown........31 31 - 62
At Hilton Coliseum; A: 396

I

MARK FRIEDMAN/Daily

The women's basketball team got off on the right foot with a 75-62 opening
game win over Georgetown.
READ DAILY SPORTS
READ DAILY SPORTS'
READ DAILY SPORTS

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