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November 11, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-11-11

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 11, 1994

ELECTION
Continued from page 1.
Newly empowered committee heads
began making promises with reckless
abandon. The next head of a House
health and environment subcommittee,
Rep. Thomas Bliley (R-Va.), said he
;would stop a high-profile investigation
of the tobacco industry.
And new committee chairs publicly
planned to dismantle much of the tax
code-- sending the bond market down
sharply - and boost defense spending
by $20 billion over five years.
But it is important to keep in mind
that much of these early days of po-
litical wrangling will soon fade from
the scene as Congress gets down to
the nitty-gritty of passing a budget
and setting public policy.
Beyond the intractable partisan-

ship and dyslexic discourse likely to
dominate the 104th Congress-Capi-
tol Hill's new overseer -the Repub-
licans, have only begun to clean house.
Under "Newtonian" management,
the GOP promises a one-third cut in
the committee staff on the first day of
the new session. Much like a presi-
dential transition, the GOP formed a
House transition team to determine
positions that will be slashed to meet
Gingrich's goal.
Will Plaster, legislative director
for transition team U.S. Rep. Vern
Ehlers (D-Grand Rapids), said the
"radical" restructuring of the House
would have benefits for students.
"With less committee staff, we
will probably need more interns,"
Plaster said, noting that most interns
are unpaid. "We must be careful not
to do to the minority, what they did to

us for 40 years."
Plaster made note of the heated
argument going on within the Repub-
lican Party in the House. Should they
use the same rules to maximize their
power that the GOP found distasteful
when it was in the minority?
"We must be fair. We must be care-
ful to respect the minority," Gingrich
told The Associated Press yesterday.
"But there are many decisions to be
made on how we should run this body."
From congressional pages to Capi-
tol police officers, the system will see
enormous change. How the Republi-
cans decide to exercise their majority
power and what reforms they push
through the 206-year-old body re-
main to be seen.
How the Republicans move from
rhetoric to governance may help de-
cide the answer.

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GOP
Continued from page 1
budget and reimposing budget restric-
tions designed to protect it from raids
by Congress.
A similar plan outlined by GOP
senators earlier this year called for
adding $20 billion to the defense bud-
get over five years. But analysts say it
is too early to tell how far GOP law-
makers actually will go once they
have their hands on the congressional
reins, particularly given the grim bud-
getary realities that Congress would
be facing no matter which party had
won the election.
Launching the opening salvo in
the struggle over the nation's eco-
nomic policies, Republicans taking
control of key committees in the 104th
Congress promised yesterday to re-
write the tax code and take an ax to a
broad array of federal programs.
At a news conference in the cav-
ernous chamber of the committee he
will lead, incoming House Ways and
Means Committee Chairman Bill
Archer (R-Tex.) called for tax breaks
for investors, married couples and the
oil and gas industry.
"There are going to be a lot of
changes in this committee and we're
looking forward to it excitedly," de-
clared Archer, who toiled in the tax-
writing committee's minority for 24
years. "Over and over again, you're
going to find that I will be articulating
whatever we can do within the tax
code to increase savings instead of
finding a way to invade the savings of
the people of this country."
Archer, who will take command
of the House committee responsible
for taxes, trade and such benefit pro-
grams as Social Security and Medi-
care, declined to specify how much
the tax cuts he advocated might cost
and offered no details on how they
could be implemented without add-
ing to the federal deficit.

Rockporf

":NINE
oiia WEST
N IN E

4 . ai

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
commemorate the 50th anniversary
of the liberation of the Philippines
from Japanese occupation near the
end of World War II. Then he is
scheduled to fly to Indonesia to join
the second annual summit of a fledg-
ing economic group known as the
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation,
or APEC.
But even traveling halfway
around the world won't allow the
president to escape entirely the dif-
ficult political situation he now faces
in Washington.
He had hoped to be able to lobby
Asian leaders to embrace free trade
by citing congressional approval of
the 123-nation trade treaty known as
GATT, for General Agreement on
Tariffs and Trade. Instead, he is being
forced to use the Asia trip to make the
case for GATT, because Congress
ENROLLMENT
Continued from page 1
African Americans now number
2,715, or 8.3percent of the total en-
rollment, compared with 2,706, or 8.1
percent, last year.
Hispanic student enrollment rose
to 1,533, or4.7 percent of all students,
up from 1,497, or 4.5 percent, last year.
Enrollment for Native American
students grew to 258, or 0.8 percent,
this year, up from 249, or 0.7 percent,
last year.
"As a part of the Michigan Man-
date, this is a priority and it's some-
thing we're quite serious about,"
Baker said. "It has involved the tire-
less efforts of many, including the
highest level of the University, fac-
ulty, staff, faculty, alumni."
The University's increase in mi-
norities has been the slowest forBlack
students.
In 1988, Black and Asian Ameri-
can enrollment accounted for the same
level ofthe student population -6.2
percent. The next year, Asian Ameri-
can enrollment surpassed Black en-
rollment, making them the largest
minority group on campus.
Today there are 706 more Asian
COUNCIL
Continued from page 1
mayor, LizBrater, they have two wild
wards in the 4th Ward.
Peter Nicolas, who lost his old
nemesis Brater in the Democratic pri-
mary for 52rd District state represn-
tative, has often sided with the Re-
publicans on fiscal issues. And
Stephen Hartwell, newly elected to
council in place of retiring Republi-
can Julie Creal, has positioned him-
self solidly in the political center.
While such posturing may be almost
indispensable for a Democrat in the
conservative ward, Hartwell appears
likely to follow his peer Nicolas on an
independent and fiscally conserva-
tive course.
Hartwell owes his election to stu-
dents in the 4th Ward, which includes
South Quad. At that polling site alone,
Hartwell outpolled his Republican
opponent, Kathryn Renken, by more
than 100 votes. He won the whole
ward by 183.
Hartwell freely admits that he
would not have won without the stu-
dent vote. And students would not

have turned out in such numbers with-
out VINE, the Voters Initiative for
November Elections. The initiative
- widely viewed as a Democratic

delayed voting on the pace, due to
take effect Jan. 1, until a lame-duck
session later this month.
White House national security
adviser Anthony Lake said that on the
trip, Clinton also would have to reas-
sure foreign leaders that his standing
had not been undermined by the di-
sastrous election results -which in a
parliamentary system would have cost
a prime minister his or her job.
What's ahead for Clinton may*
prove to be a great political irony:
Two years ago, he was elected to the
White House after criticizing his
predecessor, former President Bush,
for paying too much attention to
problems abroad and too little to
those at home. But with resurgent
Republican majorities controlling
both houses of Congress, Clinton
may find himself taking refuge in
foreign policy as one of the few
arenas in which he'll have room to
maneuver.
Americans than Black students on
campus.
Monts said the University needs
to place a greater emphasis on its
recruiting efforts to improve Black
enrollment.
"I believe it's going to take a con-@
certed effort across the campus....
I'm not pleased with the progress
we're making," he said.
The University also has been less
successful in retaining Black students.
For the entering class of 1987,
65.1 percent of all Black students
graduated within six years, compared
with 85.4 percent for the University
as a whole. For Asian Americans en-
tering the University in 1987, 88.2
percent graduated within six years.
"Many students of color face tre-
mendous financial burdens, the cul-
tural climate, and I do think there
needs to be more support of our aca-
demic support services," Monts said.
"We must increase our efforts to in-
fuse diversity and multiculturalism
into our teaching and learning pro-
grams. As society changes the Univer-0
sity must change to reflect society."
Overall, enrollment dropped 290
students from 36,758 in 1993 to 36,468
in 1994.
attempt to capitalize on the student
vote - moved city elections from
April to November. It was challenged
by Republicans, who found most of
their fears vindicated Tuesday when
Ann Arbor voters put another Demo-
crat on council. VINE more than ne-
gated the coattail effect of popular
Republican Gov. John Engler, whose
candidacy was considered a boon to
Ann Arbor Republicans.
Council Republicans consider
their principal role to be a check on
the Democrats, particularly on the
budget. Without a veto, this role wil
be seriously 'diminished.
Sheldon likes to point out that
most city votes are unanimous, a tes-
tamentto the coalition-building skills
of the mayor and David Stead, who
lost to Sheldon in Tuesday's election.
The Democratic caucus has no Stead-
in-waiting, a savvy politician who is
firmly in the party camp but willing to
deal with Republicans in good faith.
With the exception of Hartwell and
Nicolas, most council Democrats are
ideologues who have little leadership
experience. Whether they choose to
work with the ever-slimmer GOP bloc

or chart their own liberal course will
determine how city government func-
tions - or fails to -- in the months
ahead.

& MORE!

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MARK MAGIDSON
fled.i~w~o~d..
THE MAYFAIR THEATRE
SANTA MONICA
CALIFORNIA

110 thS
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Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
(one block south of CCRB)
EXPLORE AND ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORSHIP
10 a.m-"Who is Hungry?"
Service of Holy Communion
6 p.m.-Evening Prayers
WEDNESDAY
9-10:15 p.m. Meeting of
"The University Group"
Fun, food, provocative discussion
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Lisa de Boer, ministry to students
Episcopal Church at U of M
CANTERBURY HOUSE
518 E. Washington St.
(behind Laura Ashley)
SUNDAY: 5 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Followed by informal supper
All Welcome
665-0606
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER CHURCH
WORSHIP: 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
2146 Moeller Ave. Ypsilanti
485-4670 Pastor Henry J. Healey
CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
971-9150. Michael Caulk, pastor. Child
and adult Sunday School class at
9:30 a.m. Forsythe Middle School,
1655 Newport Rd.
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m. worship service.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. English, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Korean
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive
Between Plymouth Rd. and Pontiac Trail
SUNDAY: Worship - 11 a.m.
Christian Education - 9:45 a.m.
A particular welcome to
North Campus students
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road, Ann Arbor
The Largest Student Group in Town
SUJNDAY: Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship at 11 a.m.
Kevin Richardson, Campus Minister
For Transportation Call 971-0773
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 Packard Rd. 662-2449. Est. 1953.
Membership: 500. Ven. Douglas Evett &
Rev. Susan Bock. SUNDAY 8 a.m. and 10:15
ST. MARY STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson * 663-0557
(Corner of William and Thompson)
Weekend Liturgies
SATURDAY: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 p.m., 10 a.m.,12noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
Fl2AY: Confessions 4-5 p.m.

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DEAD CAN DANCE
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6

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Dead Can Dance (Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard)
or ' 99on a'e~e a 44()flA J.' .
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