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November 04, 1994 - Image 18

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-11-04

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6 - The Michigan Daily - Weekend etc. - Friday,_November 4, 1994

In search of NMOY
By TED WATTS
There are a handful of individuals who have the ability to truly excel in several
fields. You might think of Will "Fresh Prince" Smith or Ronnie "Dutch" Reagan.
But in all their glory, they are as nothing to the auteur of the century: Leonard
Nimoy.
Star of television and movies, an author of an autobiography and certainly a
better director than William
S h a t n e r, Leonard Nimoy is
a man of many + obvious talents.
Through the darkness of the
years, however, one realm of his
achievments has faded from our
c o l l e c t i v e memory:hismusic.
Itispossible that you've heard of
Nimoy's folky singing career. The musty platters of vinyl put out by the
Paramount-owned DOT Records (numbering at least four, potentially more)
have developed a mythic reputation. At the same time, almost no one seems to
have ever heard or seen the albums with their photos of Nimoy in butterfly collars
with a crooked smile and messy hair.
But some of Nimoy's greatest hits are available on CD. Creation Records in
England released a 20-track compilation of Nimoy songs last year. Entitled
"Highly Illogical," after one track done as if the singer was the Vulcan first
officer of the first starship Enterprise, it is a disc that also boggles the mind with
its campy country/folk feel.
From the Johnny Cash song "I Walk the Line" to the J.C. Fogerty penned
"Proud Mary" (and yes, Nimoy sings "Big wheel keep on toinin', Proud Mary
keep on boinin"'), the album exudes a real '70s feel good aura. As explained by
the liner notes of one of the original albums, "The New World of Leonard
Nimoy": "Nimoy has remained, throughout all of the 'Hollywood hype,' a warm,
genuine,down-to-earth and concerned individual. His interests are vital and real,
his musical tastes, logically enough, are earthy." One would hope that copy writer
was fired post haste from the Paramount organization.
Well, maybe it's due to his need to get out of the pigeonhole of Spock while
retaining its safety, but the album is nothing if not schizophrenic. Opposed to the
earthy side are songs penned by Nimoy himself. They range from happy pop
songs like "Highly Illogical" that are based on Spock to just plain violently crazy
songs like "Amphibious Assault". Said psychotic song speaks graphically about
a battle being fought by the poor while the rich have aparty in some sort of mobile

Leonard Nimoy in "A Chorus Line." Oh, wait, it's actually Star Trek VI, the tuna melt. Nimoy has his phaser set on "toaster oven."

ballroom. You know, if that's not vital, real and down to earth, Ijust know what
is. Well,one of Nimoy's original albums was called "The Two Sides of Leonard
Nimoy." That's certainly some kind of tip off.
Oh, but it doesn't end there. Nimoy takes on J.R.R. Tolkien with the song
"Ballad of Bilbo Baggins." With lines like "In the middle of the earth in the land
of the shire, there's a brave little hobbitt whom we all admire" being sung by the
voice of a famous fictional alien over what sounds like a tuba from "Green
Acres," it is the pinnacle of surreality. Gee, you'd have to find William Shatner
singing "Mr Tambourine Man" to get something odder.
The "Highly Illogical" CD is also a bit strange in what it leaves out.

Specifically, "Put a Little Love In Your Heart" is missing. One theory might'
be that since it's on one of the "Golden Throats" compilations of cheesy
celebrity cover songs, it has been suppressed from the Nimoy compilation.
Damn those beauracracies. Always working against the best interests of the
consumers.
Still, "Highly Illogical" is commendable for its resuscitation of some nearly
lost songs by one of the preemminent men of the modern age. Perhaps it will
snowball into a boxset release of all the Nimoy recordings. Oooh, the concept!
Maybe someone in this nation will pick up the banner and run with the general
idea. If they do, look forward to areissue of Bill Cosby's "SilverThroat" album.

Quality art isn't far from home

I

Ann Arbor events and exhibits in November

0

By MATT CARLSON
While New York City and Wash-
ington D.C. may be considered by
most purveyors of the arts to be two
of the biggest and most influential
cultural centers in the United States,
the Midwest is certainly not the cut-
out bin of "fine" art. Particularly
within the realm of museums and
galleries, Ann Arbor and its surround-
ing area are actually quite blessed
with a relatively large number of
high quality exhibitors.
Cleveland, of all places, has long
been considered a center for the arts
in the Midwest, but that's a bit too far
for an average student to drive in
order to take in some of that city's

museums. But why should one have
to do that much travelling (is there
really any other reason to go to Cleve-
land?) when Toledo is right down the
road, so to speak.
Now, I know that to many of you,
Toledo will sound like an unlikely
source for cultural enrichment. To-
ledo will, unfortunately, be remem-
bered foremost for the Mudhens, the
zoo and its ... actually, there really
isn't much to remember about To-
ledo, but they do have one of the
finest collections of paintings, sculp-
tures and other forms of art housed in
perhaps the most uniquely designed
museum anywhere. Only an hour or
so away, Toledo is a "must visit"

cultural mecca for any avid worship-
per of artistic endeavors.
Now, Ann Arbor may not have
nearly as strong of an art museum, but
would you rather spend a luxurious
evening here, or in Toledo? That's
what I thought.
The University's Museum of Art
is a bit more traditional in its design
and collection than Toledo, but usu-
ally has a stimulating, new exhibition
of significance.
Besides the Museum of Art, the
University's School of Art has exhi-
bitions and displays which can be
found in a number of buildings.
Of course, the Ann Arbor Hands-
On Museum musn't be forgotten, even
though it is more of a science museum
than an arts museum. Finally, local
galleries like the Matrix and the Alexa
Lee display new works by local art-
ists who usually deserve more atten-
tion than they receive.
So, in an effort to cover "the arts"
more completely, here is the first of a
monthly calendar of present exhibits
running through November at local
showrooms.

The University of Michigan
Museum of Art
"Isamu Noguchi: Exploration and
Collaboration" showcases the work
of Noguchi, a popular sculptor whose
creaations are both surreal and mod-
ern. His sets were used for Martha
Graham's ballets "Cave of the Heart"
and "Circe," therefore, this exhibit is
presented in conjunction with the
Martha Graham Festival. Runs
through November 13.
"The Jade Studio: Masterpieces
of Ming and Qing from the Wong
Nanp'ing Collection" spans four cen-
turies of Chinese painting and callig-
raphy. Runs through November 20.
"Transition and Transformation:
African Art of the In-Between" in-
cludes paintings, woodcarving,
masks, pottery and other forms be-
tween states of being. Runs through
June 25.
"John Stephenson: After the Fire,
A Retrospective" honors
Stephenson's great work which
bridges the gap between sculpture
and ceramics on the occasion of his
retirement from teaching at the School
of Art. Begins November 5 and runs

through January 15. look for storms in case you ever want
Call 764-3731 for more informa- to be an air-traffic controller. Hurry
tion. up, you don't want to miss this! Runs
The Ann Arbor Hands-On Mu- through November 7.
seum
"Thunderstorm Detectives" See EXHIBIT, Page 8
teaches those interested in how to

I

An image from the New Eden exhibit is seen here.

-A '3-E -.,
miss your
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DRAG CITY RECORDING ARTIST
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with PLUSH & APOLLO 9 SPECIAL 18 & Over Show
WED. NOVEMBER 16. DOORS 9:30 nm

The 1994 Iluaren
Cultural Show
Sunday, November 6,1994
4:00 pm
Michigan Theatre
Students $4 * Adults $8
Tickets are on sale at the Michigan Union Ticket Office
until Saturday, November 5,1994
*Entree Plus Accepted

FOR JUNIOR NURSING STUDENTS
A NURSING EXPERIENCE AT
MAYO FOUNDATION HOSPITALS -
ROCHESTER, MN
Here is your opportunity to work at Mayo Medical Center for
the summer.
Summer Ill is a paid, supervised hospital work experience at

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ickets will be sold on Sunday
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F I

I

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