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November 04, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-11-04

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 4, 1994

BANKS
Continued from page 1
Martin said that University Presi-
dent James J. Duderstadt, as an Engi-
neering faculty member and a former
dean of the college, will probably
have a major role in the search for a
new dean
But Whitaker downplayed
Duderstadt's influence on the search.
"He usually doesn't get involved
until the end. The search, down until
the very end, will be conducted by the
provost's office," Whitaker said.
Banks' resignation makes the Col-

lege of Engineering the fourth Uni-
versity unit with an open dean's seat.
In October, Rackham Dean John
D'Arms announced he would not seek
reappointment. In addition to Rack-
ham, both Public Health and Phar-
macy are in the midst of searches for
new deans. Whitaker said it is not
unusual to have three or four dean
seats open at one time.
ERIM began in 1946 as a part of
the University. In 1973, the laborato-
ries became an independent entity,
with the goal of continuing to apply
imaging technology to society's
needs.

The institute employs about 600
full-time and part-time staff mem-
bers, including students and faculty
members from the University.
With Banks at the helm, efforts
with the University may increase.
"It's a great opportunity for a closer
relationship between the University
and ERIM," Banks said.
As dean, Banks worked to increase
the transfer of technology to the pri-
vate sector. Martin said this likely
will increase with the next dean.
"We're entering a time where
there's more emphasis with industrial
interactions. Not that Dean Banks

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didn't encourage that, but I think the
environment will be more demanding
that that happen. The new leader will
help push us more in that direction,"
Martin said.
Randy Schwemmin, president of
the Engineering class of 1995, said
Banks played a role in the college
similar to Duderstadt's position in the
University.
"A lot of the things Peter did didn't
seem friendly to students and the same
is for President Duderstadt, but the
college wouldn't be where it is with-
out his work," Schwemmin said. "The
president and Dean Banks' role cen-
tered around raising money. It's some-
thing that's vital to keeping the col-
lege going."
Schwemmin said the new dean
should work to increase women and
minority enrollment at the University
and to improve undergraduate educa-
tion in the college.
Banks earned his bachelor's-
master's degree in electrical engineer-
ing from Stanford University in 1960.
In 1965, Banks earned a doctoral de-
gree in physics from Pennsylvania
State University.
He went on to teach at the Univer-
sity of California at San Diego and
Utah State University. He spent 10
years at Stanford before taking the
post of dean at the University.

AWAREN ESS
Continued from page 1
Seiler, the Panhellenic Association
adviser.
Alcohol Awareness Week begins
with the kick-off of a movie series
Sunday. "Days of Wine and Roses," a
movie that looks into the life of an
alcoholic and his wife, will be shown
Sunday at the State Theatre.
The program's organizers hope to
raise awareness about alcohol use and
about programs that help those who
may have a drinking problem, said
Deb Kraus of Counseling Services.
"College is a time of heavy drink-
ing, and people assume there are no
consequences of that," Kraus added.
She cited common drinking-related
problems: regretted sexual relations,
injuries and alcohol poisoning.
"I think that our goal is to have
people use alcohol in a way that works
for them ... and to evaluate their own
relationship to alcohol, to drink in a
safe and moderate way," she said.
AlcoholicsAnonymous, Womenfor
Sobriety and other groups participate in
a self-help panel discussion Monday.
Nora Gessert, faculty and staff
health educator, said, "I know from
past experience that the self-help panel
discussions ... seem to draw a good
crowd and ... it's a safe place for
people to come and get information."
Scherer said Alcohol Awareness
Week will be important in curbing
such abuse. "I think it's very impor-
tant for us to try and change some of
the attitudes ... surrounding alcohol,"
she said. "It's just part of changing
the culture."
THIRD WARD
Continued from page 12
said.
Distancing herself from the fis-
cally conservative policies of City +
Council Republicans and an increas-
ing number of Democrats, Carlberg
would not rule out atax increase. "Wel
have to consider every possibility and
examine each possibility for its im-
pact on our citizens," she said.
Pace said the city should start re-;
ducing expenses immediately by+
eliminating the thrice-weekly curbsideI
trash pickup. Noting that "money is1
not coming out of the sky," Pace said+

Alcohol Awareness Week
NOVEMBER 6, SUNDAY
* Filmfest: "Days of Wine and Roses"
@ State Theater, 9 p.m.
NovEmSER 7, MONDAY
a Crashed car @ Diag
* Self-help Panel Discussion @
Rackham Amphitheater, 7 -8:30 p.m.
* Filmfest: "A Streetcar Named Desire"
@ State Theater, 9 p.m.
NOVEM8 8, TuEsAY
" TThe Leaders and Best" presenta-
tion, Pat Summerall and Bruce Kimball
@ Crisler Arena, 7 p.m.
+ Talk to Us Presentation
@ West Quad Library, 9 p.m.
NOVEMBER 9, WEDESDAY
" "The Four Stages of Drinking: a
comedic look at the Problems of
Excessive Drinking"-Mike Green
@ Rackham Auditorium, 8 p.m.
* Film: "Bird" @ State Theater, 9 p.m.
NOVEMBER 10, THUR msA
g "Alcohol and the Law"
@ Pi Beta Phi sorority, 6:30 p.m.
* Film: "When a man Loves a Woman"
@ State Theater, 9 p.m.
NOVEMBER 11,FRIDAY
* Film movie analysis with film buff
Tom Morson - Brown Bag Lunch
@ 3100 Michigan Union, 12 -1 p.m. I
Alcohol Awareness Week has
been in the making since last summer,
and the efforts have been coordinated
by the Substance Abuse Education
Network, whose members include
representatives from University
Health Services, Counseling Services,
and the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Pro-
grams Office, among others.
he could not support any tax increase.
DeVarti not only bristles at the
mention of more taxes, he says they
should be pared to the bare minimum
for the city to function. DeVarti advo-
cates privatizing city services to re-
duce expenses. Ann Arbor's contract
with National Garages Inc. to build
parking structures should be a mode
for the City Council to follow, h
said.
"Ann Arbor is a corporation. It is
a corporation made up of the citizens
of Ann Arbor," DeVarti said. "I be-
lieve it should be run like a corpora-
tion, with the emphasis on cutting
costs."

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Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
(one block south of CCRB)
EXPLORE AND ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORSIP
10 a.m- "A Place is Set at the Table"
Service of Holy Communion
6 p.m.-Monthly Hymn Sing
WEDNESDAY
9-10:15 pm. Meeting of
"The University Group"
Fun, food, provocative discussion
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Lisa de Boer, ministry to students
Episcopal Church at U of M
CANTERBURY HOUSE
518 E. Washington St.
(behind Laura Ashley)
SUNDAY: 5 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Followed by informal supper
All Welcome
665-0606
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER CHURCH
WORSHIP: 11 a.m. & 7p.m.
2146 Moeller Ave. Ypsilanti
485-4670 Pastor Henry J. Healey
CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
971-9150. Michael Caulk, pastor. Child
and adult Sunday School class at
9:30 a.m. Forsythe Middle School,
1655 Newport Rd.
SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. worship service.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
1423 Washtenaw (between South U. & Hill)
WORSHIP
SUND AY 9:45 a.m. Faith, Exploration
Discussions in French Room
over coffee and bagels
Worship: 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
BRUNCH: 12 noon (Students Free)
THURSDAY: 5:30 p.m. Campus Worship (casual)
in Curtis Room
suppers following
Rev. Amy M. Heinrich, Campus Pastor
662-4466
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministrv 741-1174
KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
meeting at Tappan Middle School
2251 E. Stadium, Ann Arbor
SUNDAYS: 9:30 A.M. 973-KNOX
Sunday school for all ages at 11 a.m.
Call for transporation from dorms
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. English, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Korean
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive
Between Plymouth Rd. and Pontiac Trail
SUNDAY: Worship - 11 a.m.
Christian Education - 9:45 a.m.
A particular welcome to
North Campus students
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road, Ann Arbor
The Largest Student Group in Town
SUNDAY: Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship at 11 a.m.
Kevin Richardson, Campus Minister
For Transportation Call 971-0773
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 Packard Rd. 662-2449. Est. 1953.
Membership: 500. Ven. Douglas Evett &
Rev. Susan Bock. SUNDAY 8 a.m. and 10:15
ST. MARY STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson * 663-0557
(Corner of William and Thompson)
Weekend Liturgies
SATURDAY: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 p.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.

MOLESTER
Continued from page 1
The woman was handcuffed and
driven to Bird Hills Park located on
the city's northwest side. The man
threatened to rape her but she talked
him out of it and was left physically
unharmed.
Love goes on to say in his message
that "this individual has been known
to approach people and ask whether
they are coming from or going to their
work site. If you are approached in
this manner, please report the inci-
dent to campus security.
"The permanent staff of the Col-
lege of Engineering was called to-
gether to a session (Wednesday) with
Dean Banks," Love said. "Among
other things, he indicated that the
suspect- according to the announce-
ment he made at this meeting - was
sighted at the EECS complex and all
of us administrators were requested
to try to get the word out."
Banks initially called the meeting
to announce that he was leaving the
University but he took the opportu-
nity to alert the public of the sightings.
"There was a person that they -

some staff members - had seen late
last week that seems to resemble th
'drawing," Banks said. "We hav
alerted DPS."
A DPS shift supervisor would not
comment on the number of calls they
received related to the incidents but
said they are looking into it.
"We've sent people up there," said
DPS Lt. Doug Swix, noting that many
of the calls were reported soon after
the composite was released. "Wy
haven't learned anything new."
Banks declined to divulge th
names of the staff members who
alerted him.
The suspect is described as a white
male, 5 feet 8 inches to 6 feet tall, with
an inch-long grayish-brown beard. He
has a medium build and is between 30
and 40 years old with a pointed nose
and gray eyes.
He was last seen wearing a blua
waist-length, hooded, cotton swear
jacket, dark pants, dark shoes and a
red and gray wool scarf. He also was
carrying a dark-colored knapsack.
In all cases, victims described their
attacker as polite and apologetic.
Anyone with information about the
suspect is asked to contact the city's
police tip line at 996-3199.
1 ®

DAVID

GRAY

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