100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1994 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Women's tennis
at ITA Midwest Regional
Tomorrow, all day
East Lansing

S

11

Hockey
vs. Ohio State
Friday, 7 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

Th4Mchga Dil edesay Nvebr ,194.Pge1

* Losing ways go up in smoke
Purdue's Colletto earns respect as team surprises

t' By CAD) A.SAFAfN

Daily Foobal writer
If the hot seat had been any warmer
for Purdue coach Jim Colletto coming
into the 1994 season, it would have
burned a hole through his pants. After
three seasons in West Lafayette,
Colletto's teams have produced a com-
bined record of 9-24, including a dis-
mal 1-10 showing last season.
With Purdue (2-1-2 Big Ten, 4-2-2
overall), the surprise team in the con-
ference, Colletto can now comfortably
sit down in his office without worrying
about catching fire.
"Purdue players liked to say they
were BigTen football players,"Colletto
said. "They were tired of getting yelled
at every day. They finally understood
the way we were going to play."
One win in their final three games
would give the Boilermakers a win-
ning season for the first time since
1984, which is their only above .500
mark in the past 13 years.
The 1984 Purdue team finished 7-5
with Jim Everett at quarterback, con-
cluding the campaign with a 27-24
postseason loss to Virginia. A decade
later, the Boilermakers once again find
themselves in bowl contention, but that
does not mean Colletto is reveling in
the team's newfound success.
"Football coaches are some of the
more dispensible people in the human

race,"the fourth-year coach said. "You
can be a bum and a hero in the space of
25 minutes."
While the fortunes of the Purdue
football program have turned around
in 1994, the coaches and players are not
completely satisfied. They are disap-
pointed with the two ties, which could
put a crimp into any plans the Boiler-
makers have for playing any football in
December or January.
The deadlock at Wisconsin in mid-
October may have appeared as good as
a victory at the time, but Saturday's tie
with Iowa was a letdown. Against the
Hawkeyes, Purdue jumped out to a 13-
0 lead, then surrendered 21 consecu-
tive points within five minutes in the
fourth quarter before tying the game.
Kicker Brad Bobisch missed a poten-
tial game-winning field goal with I I
seconds remaining.
"It was basically an extra point, and
he missed it," Colletto said. "That was
a kick you should make. If we make
that kick, everyone goes home happy."
Instead, the Boilermakers and their
fans exited without any joy.
"Last week I was a bum," Colletto
said. "Maybe this week I'll be the good
guy."
What made the tie with the
Hawkeyes even more difficult to take
was the loss of starting quarterback
Rick Trefzger with a torn knee liga-

Last week 1 was a
bum. Maybe this week
I'll be the good guy.'
- Jim Colletto
Purdue football coach

ment-the same one he originally had
surgery on in high school. Trefzger,
who will be out for the rest of the
season, may not have been lighting up
the scoreboard (he had only three touch-
down passes) but he provided Purdue
with stability at quarterback, some-
thing the team lacked in Colletto's first
three years at the helm.
The starting job now belongs toO
sophomore Billy Dicken, who came
into the season without any college
playing experience, but now must try
to lead the Boilermakers to a winning
record. Dicken performed well in three-
plus quarters Saturday, completing 12
of 24 passes for 200 yards and a touch-
down.
"Last week he was happy to be just
watching the game," Colletto said,
"Now, he's got six days to dwell on*
(starting against Michigan). His role is
going to change dramatically."
Despite the fine season, Colletto
See PURDUE, Page 11
Men'sgoif,
caps stelar
failseason
win

DOUGLAS KANTER/Daily

Quarterback Rick Trefzger and the Purdue Boilermakers have nearly upended the Wolverines the past two seasons.

N E T
R E S U L T S
By RODERICK BEARD
Daily Sports Writer
When I watch the Michigan women's volleyball team,
I think back to high school gym class. The teacher made
the class play volleyball and everyone wanted to be
somewhere else. No one played with enthusiasm; instead,
we watched the clock and pondered what would be on TV
that night. That is basically how the Wolverines look
when they play matches - as if they're sleepwalking and
waiting for the match to be over.
Given that comparison, it would seem illogical to pick
Michigan (1-11 Big Ten, 5-18 overall) to win either of its
matches this weekend at Cliff Keen Arena. After all, the
Wolverines play Penn State Friday and Ohio State Satur-
day. Michigan boasts a nine-match losing streak and an
inexperienced, frustrated squad; the Lions and Buckeyes
bring national rankings and potent offenses.
Penn State (11-1, 22-1) is the No. 3 team in the country
and ranks in the top three in the Big Ten in every major
statistical category. Besides that, the Lions have won all
nine matches against the Wolverines since they entered
the conference in 1991. Most recently, Penn State
embarassed Michigan15-6, 15-4, 15-7 last month. Penn
State was the runner-up in last year's NCAA Champion-
ships and boasts four quality seniors this year in Laura
Cook, Saundi Lamoureux, Jen Reimers and last year's
Big Ten Player of the Year, Salima Davidson. The Lions
will pull this match out in three tough games.
The No. 4 Buckeyes (11-1, 18-2) lead the conference
in kills, hitting efficiency and assists. Senior middle
blocker Jenny Jackson, who has been Big Ten Player of

Look for Blue to
upset Ohio State
the Week twice so far this season, pounded Michigan in
Ohio State's 15-5, 15-6, 15-10 trouncing in the last
meeting. Ohio State has beaten the Wolverines 13 straight
times and has only lost to Michigan once under coach Jim
Stone.
This time will be different, though.That's right. The
Wolverines will upset the Buckeyes this weekend. There
are three reasons for this:
e Michigan has nothing to lose. The Wolverines can't
lose matches forever, and a victory over Ohio State could
turn the season around for them. On its home court,
Michigan took the Buckeyes to four games last season.
" The upset factor. Though Ohio State is the only team
to beat Penn State this year, the Buckeyes' two losses have
come at the hands of unranked teams - Houston and
Indiana - in five-game matches. Ohio State matches up
well against the Lions, but will not be able to handle
Michigan Saturday. The Wolverines played well last
weekend in losses to Purdue and Illinois and seems ready
for a big win.
. Lineup changes. Michigan coach Greg Giovanazzi
has shuffled the lineup like a Las Vegas dealer. The lineup
of Shareen Luze, Suzy O'Donnell, Aimee Smith, Darlene
Recker, Linnea Mendoza and Sarah Jackson or Shannon
Brownlee seems to work well together, as they showed in
last weekend's matches.
If you want to see quality volleyball, go to one of the
matches this weekend. Penn State will definitely play
well, as will Ohio State. The Wolverines will pull the
upset and help me forget about those girls in my high
school gym class.

By CHRIS MURPHY
For the Daily

.'

Women spikers close, but
VOLLEYBALL NOTEBOOK not close enough to win

The Michigan men's golf team
closed out the season in style yester-
day finishing first in the Florida At-
lantic University Invitational Golf
Tournamet. The two-day event was
held at the PGA National Resort in
Palm Beach, site of the Senior PGA
Championship.
Michigan faced 14 teams from
both Division I and II including
Florida Southern, Rollins, and Mis-
sissippi, which are all southern schools
with strong golf programs. The pe-
rennially competitive southern teams
had originally concerned head coach
Jim Carras.
"Our team relies on balance,"
coach Jim Carras said. "We're get-
ting good leadership out of Chris
Brockway and Bill Lyle."
Brockway, with a score of 214
(two under par), was the No. 1 player
in the tournament. His individual
scores included a 69 in the second
round - his career best. Brockway
finished six strokes ahead of the run-
ner-up.
This marks the second time
Brockway has won a tournament this
season. He also won the Falcon Cross
Creek Invitational in Colorado
Springs.
Senior captain Bill Lyle tied for
fourth place with a score of 223. Lyle's
score, combined with Brockway's,
was enough to give the Wolverines
their second tournament title of the
year.
The win in Florida caps off what
has been perhaps the most successful
golf season in Michigan history. Thee
Wolverines have competed in five
tournaments this fall and have done
extremely well. The team has fin-
ished first twice.
They have also had second and
third place finishes. Carras attributes
his team's success this season to good
balance and the leadership of upper-
classmen.
"We've had the best fall season in.
my 17 years in the program," Carras
said.

By RODERICK BEARD
Daily Sports Writer
It's usually hard to find a silver
lining when a team is in the midst of a
long losing streak. If the Michigan
women's volleyball team has anything
positive to point to after losing nine
consecutive matches, it could be that
they are scoring more points.
In the first seven matches of the
losing streak, the Wolverines only
scored 13 or more points in five of 22
games. What's worse is that Michigan
only won one game in that span. In last
weekend's two road losses at Purdue
and Illinois, the Wolverines reached 13

points five times and won three games.
Michigan coach Greg Giovanazzi
said that the team does feel some satis-
faction in getting to 13.
"Unfortunately, we don't play to
13," he said.
Giovanazzi said he was impressed
that the women played hard last week-
end, but he dwells on the games that the
Wolverines should have won. Specifi-
cally, he points to Michigan's 13-4
lead over the Boilermakers in the third
game. The Wolverines did not score
another point in the game and let Pur-
due win the game 15-13.
Against the Illini, Michigan also let

a big lead get away. The Wolverines
led 13-8, but could not close the game
out and let Illinois come back.
FINDING THE MARK: Michigan's
improved its hitting percentage in its
two weekend matches. In the loss to the
Boilermakers, the Wolverines hit.250;
they hit .200 in the Illini match. Michi-
gan ranks ninth in the Big Ten in hitting
efficiency with a .165 average for the
season. In their last two matches, the
Wolverines hit an embarrassing .017
against Indiana and a miserable .075 in
a lost to Michigan State.
TAKING 'AIM': Outside hitter
Aimee Smith is making her presence
known. The senior co-captain set a
See VOLLEYBALL, Page 11

EVANPERIE/Dany
The Michigan volleyball team takes on third-ranked Penn State Friday.

Penn State
Ohio State
Illinois
Wisconsin
fowa
Minnesota
Indiana
Michigan State
Northwestern
Purdue
Mkhigan

Conf(
WON
11
11
8
7
6
6
5
5
3.
3
I

LOST
1
1
4
5
6
6
7
7
9
1~1

WON
22
18
16
17
16
14
14
13
12
5
5

LOST
1
2
9
7
8
10
10
10
12
16
is

READ THE DAILY

w.

w 0 8 o
n

®m mm mmmIm&m

11

0

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan