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October 27, 1994 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-27

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Men's Soccer
vs. Ferris State
Tomorrow, 6 p.m.
Mitchell Field

S

TS

Ice hockey
vs. Ferris State
Tomorrow, 7 p.m.
Big Rapids

Moss more than meets the eye
Badger tailback a force on the field and in the community

By MIKE PATERSON
The Badger Herald
He stands in front of a group of
.15 adolescents. He talks about the
dangers of drugs, guns and gangs.
But he also tells them about the joys
of being a big-time college football
player.
To these kids, along with every
Badger football fan in the country, he
is best known as a hard-hitting run-
ning back and All-America candi-
date.
But this is a side of the man many
people do not see.
This is a side of Brent Moss his
coaches, teammates and friends
know.
"Brent is a physical, fierce com-
petitor, and that makes him a
player," said fellow tailback Terrell
Fletcher. "But off the field, this same
attitude is mixed with a bit of inti-
macy and that makes him a good
person."
This intimacy and sense of caring
for people is a component of Moss'
personality that does not show up on
the football field.
"Brent's given a lot and people
don't see this," said Wisconsin coach
Barry Alvarez. "He's worked with
youth groups on Madison's south
side.'
Moss, who has spent time at the
Atwood Community Center, said
working with underprivileged people
is something he would like to do when
he is finished carrying the ball on the
100-yard green field.
"I'd like to spend time with kids
and tell them the truth and tell them

'Brent is a physical,
fierce competitor, and
that makes him a
player.'
-- Terrell Fletcher
Wisconsin running
back
the way it is when I'm done with
football," said Moss, who gained
1672 yards last year, the most by
any Wisconsin running back since
1985.
"I'd like to help unfortunate kids.
It may seem like I have a lot, but I
don't have much more than anyone
else. My dream is to help kids that
need help."
This is not the Brent Moss that
shows up on fall Saturdays at Camp
Randall Stadium. Last year's Big
Ten Offensive Player of the Year
and Rose Bowl Most Valuable
Player strikes fear in the hearts of
opponents because of his crushing
running style.
Moss has been named to numer-
ous preseason All-American teams,
but he said he has one goal in mind.
"Ijust try to be better every week,"
said Moss, a native of Racine. "This
year, I'd like to become more of a
complete back and accomplish what I
accomplished last year."
Becoming more of a complete
back, Fletcher said, may not be that
tough of a goal for Moss to attain.
"It seems the older we get, the

more simple our running styles get,"
said Fletcher, who has always been
known as the cutting and slashing
runner while Moss was known as
punishing and relentless on would-be
tacklers.
As time goes by, Moss has be-
come an integral part of the student
body.
"It's great to be appreciated," Moss
said.
But there was a time when Moss
was not the most understood or ap-
preciated player on the shores of
Lake Mendota. As a freshman stu-
dent, he was forced to sit out the
entire year because of his Proposi-
tion 48 status.
During this time, he would re-
ceive phone calls in his dorm room
asking the answer to simple math
problems. A rule change during Moss'
tenure as a Badger allowed him to
regain the year of eligibility he lost
and he is on campus for his fifth and
final fall campaign.
The fact that he overcame these
obstacles to become a prime-time
See MOSS, Page 13

EVAN PETRIE/Daily
Brent Moss was a major factor in Wisconsin's Big Ten title run last year. This season, injuries have hampered both
the senior tailback and his team. The Badgers have just a 3-3-1 record thus far.

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1

By CHRIS MURPHY
For the Daily
The race for the Rose Bowl usu-
ally characterizes the final month of
Big Ten conference play. And with
Penn State and Ohio State meeting
this weekend in Happy Valley, this
season is no exception.
A year ago this weekend, Ohio
State overpowered Penn State in Co-
lumbus. The Nittany Lions should be
poised for a big game. They have had
two weeks to prepare for the Buck-
eyes, their last real regular-season
test.
Penn State (3-0 Big Ten, 6-0
overall) vs. Ohio State (3-1, 6-2)
It's Homecoming in Happy Val-
ley and the Nittany Lions face what
will probably be their final obstacle in
reaching the Rose Bowl. Ohio State
has had its ups and' downs this season
but seems to be playing its best foot-
ball at just the right time.
The key to an Ohio State victory
lies with its offense, particularlyquar-
terback Bobby Hoying. The junior
signal caller is coming off his career-
best game (20-for-24, 304 yds, 5 TD)
againstPurdue. Hoying's primary tar-

get will be senior split end Joey Gal-
loway; the tandem hooked up for three
touchdowns last Saturday. Another
key to the Buckeyes' success is
tailback Eddie George, thethird-lead-
ing rusher in the Big Ten.
After a huge performance against
Michigan and Tyrone Wheatley, Penn
State's defense will again have to
come up big. Outside linebacker
Willie Smith could be a big factor if
he can penetrate into the offensive
backfield.
Penn State boasts the nation's No.
I offense, featuring tailback Ki-Jana
Carter, a Heisman candidate, and quar-
terback Kerry Collins, the nation's
top-rated passer and also a Heisman
hopeful.
Ohio State's defense has looked
good in its last two games. However,
Michigan State and Purdue, the Buck-
eyes' last two opponents, are not
nearly as stacked as the Lions.
What it all boils down to is a game
that will bear strong resemblance to
the Michigan-Penn State clash of two
weeks ago. We will we see a good
deal of offense; the team who wants it
more will come out the victor. And
there is no one in the country that
wants it more than Joe Paterno.
Penn State, 36-24.
Michigan State (1-3, 2-5) vs. In-
diana (2-2, 5-2)
The Spartans are on the decline,

and if they don't rebound soon, coach
George Perles could be history. In-
deed, Perles is on the hot seat, and
things don't seem to be getting any
easier in East Lansing.
Michigan State plays host to Indi-
ana this weekend, and while the Hoo-
siers shouldn't really scare anyone,
the Spartans, with the worst run de-
fense in the conference, might have
some trouble on their hands.
Indiana features freshman tailback
Alex Smith, the No. I rusher in the
league. Smith is coming off a subpar
performance last weekend against
Northwestern and will be looking for
some big holes against the soft Spar-
tan defense.
Michigan State has got to stop the
run and create offense on the other
side of the ball. The Spartans are due,
and if Perles' dire straits are evident
to the players, the team should be
ready. Indiana and their running game
will give them a game, though.
Michigan State, 24-21.
Iowa (1-4,3-5) vs. Purdue (2-1-
1,4-2-1)
Iowa is coming off what coach
Hayden Fry called one the most satisfy-
ing victories of his career. After losing
five straight games the Hawkeyes are
flying high after their victory against
Michigan State. The problem is that the
Boilermakers are returning home after
a humiliating loss in Columbus and

they're not happy.
The Boilermakers' running game
(featuring backs Mike Alstott and
Corey Rogers) should prove to be to
much for a young Iowa defense. Th
two Purdue runners are both on apace
to gain over 1000 yards this season.
Furthermore, the Boilermakers are en-
joying one of their best seasons since
1984, when they finished second in
the Big Ten with an overall record of
7-5.
Iowa may be able to score on the
Boilermakers, but the difference in
the game will be Purdue's powerful
running game. The Boilermakers are
on a quest for their first bowl berth
in 10 years and the Hawkeyes are
not going to stop them.
Purdue, 41-21.
Illinois (2-2,4-3) vs. Northwest-
ern (2-2, 3-3-1)
Last week, Illinois linebackers
Dana Howard and Simeon Rice were
named Butkus Award semifinalists.
The Illini will be looking to their..
defense to combat a running back
who is arguably the hottest in the
country.
The Wildcats feature tailback
Dennis Lundy, who last Saturday
became Northwestern's all-time
leading rusher. Lundy has amassed
just under 400 yards in his last two
games. However, he should be
slowed down by an Illinois defense
that is rated No. 1 in the Big Ten.
Howard should be the key factor as
he is coming off a 20-tackle perfor-
mance against Michigan.
The Illinois running game was
stopped last weekend, but the passing
offense under sophomore quarterback
Scott Weaver picked up the slack.
Illinois should have no trouble mov-
ing the ball against a Wildcat defenseg
ranked second to last in the league.
If Lundy can break some runs,
Northwestern may make it a game.
However, if the the Illinois defense is as
smart as it is tough, one offensive
weapon isn't going to make a differ-
ence. The Wildcats are trying to win
four games for the first time since 1986,
but they'll have to wait another week.
Illinois, 20-7.

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