100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1994 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 26, 1994

CY YOUNG
Continued from page 11
ing and winning Game four, then was
the winner in relief in Game six as
Toronto topped Atlanta for its first
championship.
Both Cone and Key left Toronto
after the 1992 season. The right-handed
Cone returned to his hometown of Kan-
sas City, signing a three-year, $18 mil-
lion contract with the Royals; the left-
handed Key got a four-year, $17 mil-
lion deal from the Yankees.
In 1993, Cone struggled to an 11-
14 mark, his first losing record since

becoming a full-time starter in the
majors. And, for the first time in four
years, the power pitcher did not lead
the big leagues in strikeouts. Key
went 18-6 with his soft stuff for the
Yankees that same year.
Cone, 31, lost his first decision
this season, then reeled off eight
straight victories. He had pitched three
consecutive shutouts and gone 28
scoreless innings before he lost to
Key and the Yankees, 5-2, on May 27
in Kansas City. In that game, Cone
allowed five runs in the first inning,
then went the rest of the way without
giving up a run.

WANT PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE?
"I WISH I BEGAN WORKING
AS AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
EARLIER IN MY COLLEGE
CAREER. WHAT MORE COULDf
I ASK FOR? THE DAILY IS'
GREAT MONEY, A GREAT
RESUME BUILDER, AND I GET
TO WORK WITH CRAIG!"
DINA VERNON,
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
(SENIOR, COMMUNICATION MAJOR)
GAIN VALUABLE
ADVERTISING SALES
EXPERIENCE!
BE AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE .
FOR WINTER TERM!
PICK UP YOUR APPLICATION
TODAY!
APPLICATION DEADLINE: CRAIG COLLISTER,
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
10/28/94 (JUNIOR, POLITICAL SCIENCE &
ECONOMICS MAJOR)
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING 9 DISPLAY DEPARTMENT 9 420 MAYNARD

CHAD A. SAFRAN
Safrancisco Treat
The Big Ten has reached the midway mark and can boast the nation's
top-ranked team - Penn State - this late in the season for the first
time in years. But the Nittany Lions success is one of the few things
most expected to happen.
Biggest surprise: Purdue. The Boilermakers (2-1-1 Big Ten, 4-2
overall) were almost a consensus preseason pick to finish in the basement
of the Big Ten, but Purdue coach Jim Coletto has done a masterful job of
emphasizing the strengths of his team - running backs Corey Rogers and
Mike Alstott. The duo is doing for Purdue what Brent Moss and Terrell
Fletcher did for Wisconsin in 1993. Rogers and Alstott are the only rushers
from the same team to appear in the conference's top 10. With four games
remaining, each may be able to gain 1,000 yards.
The Boilermakers are benefiting from a weak non-conference schedule,
but they did come up with a big win at Illinois and a tie against Wisconsin.
With three home games in their final four (Iowa, Michigan and Indiana)
and a trip to Michigan State, a Hall of Fame Bowl bid is in reach.
Runner up: Ohio State
Biggest Disappointment: The whole conference could be a candidate
for this one. After having as many as six teams in the preseason rankings,
only three currently reside in the Associated Press and CNN/USA Today
polls.
However, the Spartans clearly get the nod here. Coach George Perles
could be fired as soon as next week after leading Michigan State to a 1-3
conference record (2-5 overall). Michigan State president Peter McPherson
demanded an "outstanding season" from Perles. What he's received in its
place is inconsistent quarterback Tony Banks, a rushing offense ranked
10th in the Big Ten - despite running behind one of the largest offensive
lines in the country - and a rushing defense that ranks last in the
conference.
Runner up: A tie between Wisconsin and Illinois.
Offensive player of the first half: Ki-Jana Carter by just a hair over
Penn State teammate Kerry Collins. He's the leading rusher on the nation's
best team. He's averaging 7.8 yards a carry. He's second in the conference
in scoring behind Michigan kicker Remy Hamilton with 54 points (nine
touchdowns). And he's done it all in six games.
While all the preseason hype went to Michigan tailback Tyrone
Wheatley, Carter has been the Big Ten's best and most consistent runner. If
there were people who didn't know about Carter earlier in the season, they
found out how spectacular he can be when he burned the Wolverines for
165 yards on the ground with his thumb in a splint.
What makes Carter all the better is his ability to catch passes out of the

Mid-point of Big Ten
means awards for some
backfield. His elusiveness in the open field and strong legs makes him
one of the toughest players to tackle in the conference.
Runner up: Kerry Collins.
Defensive player of the first half: Dana Howard, Illinois. He may not
be as tall as other linebackers (6 feet) but no one has the ability to stop the
run like Howard, although Michigan's Steve Morrison comes close. He
leads the Big Ten in tackles with 95 (an average of 13.9 per game) and
registered an astounding 20 against the Wolverines Saturday.
Before the Fighting Illini played at Ohio State, Howard guaranteed a
win. Plenty of players make boasts but then do not perform. However,
Howard is not one of those players. He registered 14 tackles and two
sacks while intercepting one pass as Illinois upset the Buckeyes, 24-10.
He earned Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week for his efforts.
Already a semifinalist for the Butkus Award as the nation's best
linebacker, Howard is all but a shoo-in as one of the three finalists. Illini
coach Lou Tepper served as defensive coordinator at Colorado before
coming to Champaign. He coached one Butkus winner in former Buffalo
Alfred Williams. At the end of 1994, he will be able to make that two.
Runner up: Steve Morrison
Freshmen of the first half: Alex Smith, Indiana (offense) and Ike
Reese, Michigan State (defense).
Smith's performance this season must make Hoosier coach Bill
Mallory scratch his head as to why he redshirted Smith in 1993. Smith
ranks first in the conference and fifth nationally in rushing with 138.6
yards per game. He set a Big Ten freshman record for rushing yards in a
game when he scampered for 221 against Kentucky. If he keeps his
current pace, Smith will not only set the conference season rushing record
for a freshman, but break Herschel Walker's national mark set in 1980.
Smith earned the state of Indiana's first Mr. Football award two years
ago after rushing for a state-record 3,024 yards as a senior. At the end of
the season he'll be able to add another trophy to his collection.
Reese has been the one bright spot on an atrocious defense that has
given up 300 yards rushing twice this season. He is the only freshman in
the conference's top 10 in tackles (tied for ninth at 65 with
Northwestern's William Bennett). He is one of the quickest outside
linebackers in the league.
He weighs less than 220 pounds but will only get stronger with each
year he plays for the Spartans. He has the ability to be as good as Illinois'
Simeon Rice (the Big Ten's best outside linebacker). However, unless
Michigan State switches to a 3-4 set or decides to blitz more, Reese will
never be able to achieve the number of sacks Rice has totaled.

0

emrnrnrn o r m m~m~min
DOEAN K
PEE IS GO BLUE K
BEAT WISCONSIN
715 N. University 761-CHIP
* 1Mon-Thurs 8:30am-8pm Fri 8:30am-5:30pm Sat 10am-5:30pm

® We ship anywhere in the Continental U. S.
hmm===m=m=mmminm====m=mmd

L, O t- -.

3O4 S4. Stalin StwmmI 4 duurmwiSciuth ci 16ibtmrty SSS-34S0
'" .m. :,,,... ,, - 7 °"2: %y "f xg M,- ,nz --=W. u ~s-': N xw<
F wt
"z" .pu a x .*^ ,a x ^^tl e a+ i c t "
, ,4 na,:a < ", 4<. : ^ x . i ^az1 x: .< r" r " . ' m ia >.§ a t :" ta
"- " x "{ ;° f .a:." 9: Nr. - r s ".."P &i kk N
I' I " "fi f L _ V t,{n4x N:kI 1"< "n x . 4 ' S. ;<N _N t i 2 a '"1 'y
t myy laa, ? i "F',r: k ;l,.a=i:*x f p "'"j:: ."
=i^"''F ,.:"x_ spa:(^r.<a. ."''x x_ at g °g s 'i3 ~x j &' et
2 , x 3 + i " x p n wN m 5? . . : -
is +r
'x ai' . r a~yx", 5K-# '"+ r a""; ?. ^ ... G w fi : fe,: k .
4 .<2"£ - N; a n c" "t"* . .;: ° "# '4< ,r a4' - g
t ? «, r " I ' 4k # " s2 " . 2 . x :.n ; s . t, x<: x x :.r g

0

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan