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October 11, 1994 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-11

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 11, 1994 - 7

MIDTERMS
tntinued from page 1
mMichigan's Democrats. The state
House is evenly split, so any losses
there would give control to the Repub-
licans, who already hold a majority in
the Senate. And Republican Gov. John
Engler has increased his lead in the
latest polls.
Hurting Democrats would be the
!st thing Clinton would want to do in
ichigan's U.S. Senate race, the first
open race in 18 years. In 1976, Demo-
cratic Rep. Don Riegle defeated Re-
publican Marvin Esch as Jimmy Carter
won the White House.
Should U.S. Rep. Bob Carr (D-
East Lansing) lose to Spence Abraham,
former state GOP chair, the Senate
Democrats could have further prob-
lems breaking Republican filibusters,
hich would slow Clinton's agenda. A
cent poll, though a statistical dead
heat, shows Abraham edging ahead.
Several minor party candidates are
also in the race. Libertarian Jon Coon,
Worker's World candidate William
Roundtree and Natural Law Party
member Chris Wege round out the
field, although none is expected to
tally a significant amount of votes.
But Clinton's agressive agenda -
m the defeated economic stimulus
package to the victorious crime bill to
the on-hold health care reform propos-
als - may have adverse effects on
some candidates this fall.
"I think Clinton has deliberately tried
to pass his more controversial stuff
early," Koliman said. "This is not un-
common. Most presidents accomplish
their most sweeping legislation in their
first two years. That sweeping legisla-
n tends to divide people."
That division can cause backlash
against the ruling party and Kollman

noted partisan politics can dominate
mid-term elections more readily.
"A vast majority of people in mid-
terms tend to vote along party lines, but
there's a small set of swing voters that
can make a big difference," he said.
Kollman also said turnout tends to
vary more among different groups in
mid-term elections. He said it is gener-
ally harder to turn out lower-income
groups than more affluent voters.
All those variables add up like the
formula Engler used to upset then-
Gov. James Blanchard four years ago.
Although a Republican occupied the
White House, low voter turnout hurt
Democrats, specifically in Metro De-
troit where only 30 percent of regis-
tered voters went to the polls. Engler
won by less than one percentage point.
ElAl
But there are many other reasons to
go to the polls. Two of Ann Arbor's
current representatives started the sea-
son seeking higher offices. State Rep.
Lynn Rivers is running for Congress.
State Sen. Lana Pollack ran for U.S.
Senate but lost in the primary.
Republican Renee Birnbaum and
Democrat Liz Brater, a former Ann
Arbor mayor, are fighting for Rivers'
place in Lansing, while Democrat Alma
Wheeler Smith and Republican Joe
Mikulec square off for Pollack's seat.
In the 53rd House District, Republican
Martin Straub challenges incumbent
Democrat Mary Schroer.
Other statewide races include the
re-election bids of two long-time pub-
lic servants. Attorney General Frank
Kelley and Secretary of State Richard
Austin have held their respective posi-
tions for more than 20 years. Republi-
can nominees John Smietanka and
Candice Miller will try to unseat them.

LECTION 1994

- THm CANDIDATES

GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR
4 YEAR TERM

STATE REPRESENTATIVE - 52ND DISTRICT
2 YEAR TERM

4 John Engler
Connie Binsfeld
Republicans (i)
Howard Wolpe )
Debbie Stabenow
Democrats
UNITED STATES SENATE
6 YEAR TERM

Mary Schroer
Democrat

Martin L. Straub
Republican

STATE REPRESENTATIVE - 53ND DISTRICT
2 YEAR TERM

Lit Brater
Democrat

Renee Birnbauin
Republican

SECRETARY OF STATE
4 YEAR TERMS

Bob Carr
Democrat

' , I

Richard H. Austin
Democrat (i)

Candice S. Miller
Republican

.4

4 Spence
Abraham
Republican
DISTRICT

ATTORNEY GENERAL
4 YEAR TERMS

Frank J. Kelley
Democrat (i)

John Smietanka
Republican

UNITED STATES CONGRESS -13THm
2 YEAR TERM
4 Lynn Nancy Rivers
Democrat
John A. Schall
Republican
STATE SENATE - 18 DIsmi
4 YEAR TERM

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN REGENTS
8 YEAR TERMS

James L. Waters
Paul Brown
Democrats (i)

Andrea Fischer
Dan Horning
Republicans

ICT

SUPREME COURT JUSTICE
NON-PARTISAN ELECTION
2 ELECTED
8 YEAR TERMS

Donald E. Shelton
Elizabeth A. Weaver

Richard Griffen
Conrad L. Mallett, Jr.

Alma Wheeler Smith
Democrat

Joe Mikulec
Republican

George F. Killeen

(i) = incumbent
KEVIN WINER/Daily

Michigan ballot features

There are four statewide propos-
als on the November ballot in Michi-
gan. Here is the actual language that
#11 appear on the ballot.
Proposal A:
A proposal to convene a constitu-
tional convention for the purpose of
drafting a general revision of the state
constitution.
Shall a convention of elected del-
egates be convened in 1995 to draft a
general revision of the state constitu-
tion for presentation to the state's
voters for their approval or rejection?
Proposal B:
A proposal to limit criminal ap-
peals.
The proposed constitutional amend-
ment would restrict a criminal defen-
dant who pleads guilty or nolo
contendere (no contest) from appealing
his of her conviction without the per-
mission of the court. Currently, some-
one who pleads guilty or no contest to a
me has the automatic right to appeal.
could this proposal be adopted?
Proposal C:
A referendum on public act143 of
1993 - an amendment to Michigan's

auto insurance laws.
Public Act 143 of 1993 would:
1.) Reduce auto insurance rates
by 16% (average) for 6 months for poli-
cyholders reducing personal injury
(medical) insurance to $1 million. Ex-
tra coverage made available at added
cost.
2.) Permit insurance Commissioner
to waive comapny's obligation to re-
duce rates if statutory formula would be
in excess of 1989-1992 state average.
3.) Place limits on personal injury
(medical) benefits.
4.) Limit fees paid to health care
providers.
5.) Limit right to sue by setting
higher standards for the recovery of
damages for "pain and suffering" and
prevent uninsured drivers and drivers
over 50% at fault from collecting dam-
ages.
6.) Allow rate reductions for acci-
dent-free driving with same insurer.
Should the law be approved?
Proposal P:
A proposal to establish a Michigan
State Parks endowment fund, increase
the maximum allowable amount of

4 proposals
funds in the Michigan Natual Resources
Trust Fund and eliminate the diversion
of dedicated revenue from the Michi-
gan Natural Resources Trust Fund.
The proposed constitutional
amendment would:
1.) Establish a Michigan State
Parks Endowment Fund to be funded
by certain royalties, bonuses and rent-
als collected by the state from the
drilling of oil and gas or mining of
minerals on state-owned land.
2.) Require that money in Endow-
ment Fund be used to operate, main-
tain and improve Michigan state parks.
3.) Limit accumulated principal
of the Endowment Fund to $800 mil-
lion with annual adjustments for in-
flation.
4.) Increase the maximum princi-
pal of the Michigan Natural Resources
Trust Fund from $200 million to $400
million.
5.) Eliminate the diversion of dedi-
cated revenue from the Michigan
Natural Resources Trust Fund.
Should this proposal be adopted?
- Complied by Daily Staff Reporter
Jonathan Berndt

THE BEHOLDER

JOSH KOLEVZON/Daily
The shops of North University reflect brightly in the glasses of LSA first-year student Brian Cooper during yesterday's
cloudless afternoon.

Students' eating habits depend on self-discipline, accessibility of food

Dornmitory
enizens are less
healthy than off-
campus dwellers
By MINDY B. KURLANSKY
For the Daily
Both in dorm cafeterias and
f artment kitchens, University stu-
ents face many obstacles in their
quest for healthful foods and bal-
anced diets. Although cafeteria chefs
claim their food is more nutritious
than what one would find off cam-
pus, not everyone is so sure.
Today's students are forced to
look at their own nutrition more care-
fully; otherwise no one would. They
o longer have a dietitian or a nutri-
inist planning their meals.
Scott Horstein, an RC senior, said,
"It's difficult sometimes to make time
for food.
"Sometimes I'm too busy and
food becomes an inconvenience,
which is a silly way to look at it.
Meaning, that it's pointless to let
yourself get so busy that you can't
take time, a half hour to an hour, to
Students who live off campus tend
to prepare their own food and cook
fresh foods. They attempt to eat a
balanced diet, although some admit
to eating "anything" around late at
night. That might range from cereal

Dorm chefs find students
are difficult to win over

FOOD
Continued from page 1
Executive Chef Steve Meyers said
many of the chefs had worked at pres-
tigious places before coming to the
University. Some worked at hotels,
local restaurants, catering halls and
country clubs.
Most decided to come to the Uni-
versity because the hours are better.
Meyers said, "They wanted to de-
velop their domestic life and spend
more time with their spouses and chil-
dren."
Meyers believes that one of the
students' primary misconceptions is
that the University does not buy qual-
ity food. He asserted that the poultry
is top grade and fresh fish is used.
"The pork is the best I have ever
seen. It is very high grade," said Buzz
Cummings, the chef at Mary Markley.
Not only is the quality of the food
satisfactory, but the chefs almost never
rely on frozen or pre-made foods,
Meyers said.
Cummings said, "We make only
enough food to serve that day. We
don't serve food over and over again."
Meyers contends that students
have a negative attitude about the

When am serving the
food, people often
come back for
seconds. I guess that
means the food can't
be that bad.
Kim Brown
LSA first-year student
first-year student, said, "There is a
good variety, but in terms of nutri-
tion, it is 'lacking because the food is
high in fat. There is a new trend in our
society to be nutritious, and it is not
quite there."
In an attempt to be customer
driven, dining services has set up a
product test committee.
The committee consists of stu'
dents that test new items. For exT
ample, they try different brands of
muffins to see which are the most
palatable.
"I want our students to know that
we care what they think and are inter=
ested in surpassing their needs,"
Meyers said.
Dining Services has also tried to
personalize the atmosphere in the caf-
eterias. Chefs smetimes leave the

JUDITH PERKINS/Daily
Maria, a chef at Mary Markley Residence Hall, prepares dinner for hungry students last week. Students in residence
halls eat from menus prepared by professional dieticians.

dietitians. "Students that live in the
dorms generally have more balanced
diets than those living off campus,"
Herzog said.
Each meal contains a well-bal-
anced variety of foods and nutri-
tional information about each item
available. That information consists
of the number of calories, the num-

always a good thing."
She said she frequently hears stu-
dents complain about the lack of va-
riety in the dorm meals. She feels the
meals are varied, but students need
to look harder to find it.
To add to their general nutrition,
some students take advantage of the
CCRB and exercise on a regular ba-

too much.
Herzog said, "There was a study
done last year concerning the nutri-
tional health of 17,000 U-M female
students. Of those women, 67 per-
cent have the mental potential for
having an eating disorder and 33
percent have an actual physical eat-
ing disorder."
14rnI aln a.l.A *th tth atn

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