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October 04, 1994 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-04

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 4, 1994 - 7

Brazilians
expected
to elect
Cardoso
Los Angeles Times
SAOPAULO, Brazil -Fernando
Henrique Cardoso, the man credited
with halting Brazil's decade-long run-
away inflation was poised yesterday
to become the nation's second demo-
cratically elected president in 31 years.
As Brazil's 94 million registered
voters headed to the ballot boxes,
Cardoso, candidate of the Brazilian
Social Democratic Party, was heavily
favored by every national poll to cap-
ture the presidency,
A final poll by Datafolha released
Sunday projected that the63-year-old
sociologist and former senator would
capture more than 50 percent of the
vote and avoid a November runoff
with projected runner-up Luiz Inacio
"Lula" da Silva, a former union leader
and candidate of the Socialist Work-
ers Party.
The first official tallies were not
expected until Tuesday afternoon.
Final official results will not be com-
plete for at least five days. If official
results show that Cardoso did not get
more than 50 percent of the vote, he
could face Lula in a Nov. 15 contest.
Cardoso - an author, a former
ambassador to the United States and a
political exile briefly during the
country's 21-year military dictator-
ship swept to the front of a field of
eight presidential hopefuls atop a wave
of support for an economic plan he
devised while serving earlier this year
as the country's economic minister.
Following the introduction in July
of his Real Plan, which included the
introduction of a new currency, the
real, inflation dropped from 50 per-
cent in June to 6 percent in July and
less than 1 percent in August.
As the nation's economy stabi-
lized, voters turned quickly away from
Lula, once the leading candidate, and
toward Cardoso.
"By voting for him," said student
Virginia Goas, 20, after casting her
vote for Cardoso in Sao Paulo, "it
guarantees that the (real) plan will
continue to work."
Mateus Helio of Sao Paulo also
voted for Cardoso. "He's stabilized
Brazil," said the 54-year-old com-
poser. "That hasn't happened in a
long time. He deserves to be presi-
dent."
If elected, Cardoso would be the
second popularly elected president
since 1963, when a military dictator-
ship took power. The military ruled
until 1984, when Jose Sarney was
installed as president through a par-
liamentary process. Fernando Collor
de Mello became president in 1989
following national elections but was
impeached three years later on cor-
ruption charges.
Yesterday's elections were the
biggest in Brazil's history, with vot-
ers spread across four time zones
choosing a new president, hundreds
of congressmen, two-thirds of the

Senate, all 27 governors and 1,500
state legislators.
In major cities such as Rio de
Janeirio, Sao Paulo, Salvador and Belo
Horizonte, voters waded to the polls
on streets littered with election pam-
phlets, posters and papers distributed
by hand, thrown to pedestrians from
passing cars or rained down like con-
fetti from office buildings during the
final days of the campaign.
Voting is mandatory in Brazil for
residents ages 18 to 70. Those 16 and
17 can vote if they desire. Yesterday
was declared a national holiday to
ensure voters time to go to the polls.

REFLECTIONS OF RACKHAM

Jordan, Israel
report progress
in economic talks

The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Leaders of
Jordan and Israel met with President
Clinton yesterday to report progress on
planning several joint economic
projects, and U.S. officials said later
that the two former enemy states hope
to achieve a comprehensive peace treaty
by the end of the year.
Crown Prince Hassan of Jordan and
Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
conferred with Clinton for an hour at
the White House to mark the first anni-
versary of a trilateral agreement under
which the United States agreed to help
the two countries move toward peace
in stages.
The work of this "trilateral com-
mission" led to the dramatic scene two
months ago when King Hussein and
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin joined
Clinton at the White House to proclaim
an end to 46 years of hostilities and to
declare their intention to hammer out a
peace treaty.
Following yesterday's Oval Office
meeting, Clinton and his two guests
emerged to describe joint economic,
environmental and tourism ventures

that the president called "the building
blocks of a modern peace between these
two ancient lands." They include:
Progress on a master plan for
joint development of the Jordan Rift
Valley, a barren, largely desert area
stretching through both countries from
the Dead Sea to the Red Sea.
Working together at the Middle
East-North Africa Economic Summit in
Casablanca at the end of this month to
attract business investment and partner-
ship between public and private sectors.
® Pursuing at the Casablanca con-
ference and elsewhere establishment
of a regional organization and financial
mechanism such as a multilateral
Middle East Bank to assist area-wide
development.
Exploring the possibility of a
canal between the Red Sea and the
Dead Sea and other measures to help
ease the critical water shortage in the
region.
Opening a new northern border
crossing for third-party nationals later
this month.
The two nations also agreed to sev-
eral otherjointeconomic programs.

The tall windows of the Modern Languages Building along E. Huron Street reveal a different perspective of the
Rackham Graduate School yesterday.

Mandela pledge'a
U.N. to fight racism,
asks for investment

Th . i A g 0 *h
world1W 0: *e a

Los Angeles Times
UNITED NATIONS - Symbol-
izing one of the great triumphs of the
United Nations, Nelson Mandela ad-
dressed the General Assembly yester-
day for the first time as president of
South Africa and pledged to wipe out
racism in his divided country.
"The road that we shall have to
travel to reach this destination will by no
means be easy," he told the General
Assembly. "All of us know how stub-
bornly racism can cling tothe mind and
how deeply it can infect the human soul.
"And yet however hard this battle will
be,"he went on,"we will not surrender."
The symbolism for the United Na-
tions was clear. For decades, the Gen-
eral Assembly had mounted a vigorous
campaign against the racist apartheid
system of South Africa and it simpris-
onmentofMandela, the country's most
prominent African nationalist leader.
The relentless campaign, which
prompted many countries to impose
sanctions, made South Africa a pariah
among nations and contributed to the
atmosphere that finally persuaded its
white leaders to give up apartheid.
The United Nations focused on
Mandela from the start. In 1963, months
before he was convicted of "sabotage"
for his anti-apartheid agitation and sen-
tenced to life in prison, the General
Assembly passed a resolution calling
on South Africa to abandon the trial.
Since his release from prison in
1990, the 76-year-old Mandela has
spoken to the United Nations twice as
an African nationalist leader. But his
visit this time was his first since his
election as president in April.
Speaking slowly in booming tones,
Mandela, dressed in a gray three-piece
suit, told the General Assembly that the
historic change in South Africa "has
come about not least because of the
great efforts in which the U.N. engaged
to ensure the suppression of the apart-
heid crime against humanity."
"The millions of our people," he
went on, "say thank you and thank you
again that the respect for your own
dignity as human beings inspired you
to act to ensure the restoration of our

"I'm not coming here
with cap in hand. I'm
coming here as a
representative of a
sovereign and proud
country."
- Nelson Mandela
South African President
dignity as well." Mandela began his
speech by noting that "it surely must be
one of the great ironies of our age that
this august assembly is addressed, for
the first time in 49 years, by a South
African head of state drawn from among
the African majority of what is an A f-
rican country."
Whilepledging that heand his people
intend tocreate "a truly non-racial soci-
ety." Mandela said their success would
"depend on our ability to change the
material conditions of life ofour people
so that they not only have the vote, but
they have bread and work as well.
"We therefore return to the United
Nations," he said, "to make the com-
mitment thatas we undertook never to
rest until the system of apartheid was
defeated, so do we now undertake that
we cannot rest while millions of our
people suffer the pain and indignity of
poverty in all its forms."
Without being specific, Mandela
then said his country needs outside
help. "We turn once more to this world
body to say we are going to need your
continued support to achieve the goal
of the betterment of the conditions of
life of our people," he said. He re-
peated this theme at a 40-minute news
conference, telling reporters he was
embarked on a state visit to the United
States to "ask the Americans to throw
their markets open to South Africa."
But, he went on, "I'm not coming
here with cap in hand. I'm coming here
as a representative of a sovereign and
proud country. I don't want charity....
But investment in South Africa will be
of mutual benefit to the United States
and the people of South Africa."

COMPANY PRESENTATION
MATT COOPER, VICE-PRESIDENT
5:30 - 7:30PM
OCTOBER 4TH

MEET THE FIRMS
4:30 - 7:30PM
OCTOBER 5TH

RESUME EXPRESS
OCTOBER 6TH

MICHIGAN LEAGUE
KOESSLER ROOM
FREE FOOD!!

College Recruiting-CL
Signet Bank Card, Attn: 12061-0430
P.O. Box 85525, Richmond, VA 23285-5525 BANK CARD
1 -800-RECRUIT A KC R

TSONGAS
Continued from page 1
"We think that students are a natu-
ral constituency," Tsongas said. "(The
deficit) affects their future."
Tsongas traveled toMichigan State
University lateryesterday, and is sched-
uled to address students today at Grand
Valley State University in Grand Rap-
ids.
Tsongas has asserted in the past
thatourcountry is headed toward "gen-
erational warfare" if the deficit is not
reduced now. He predicts that working

tion distributed "Get Real," a booklet
tailored to college students that de-
scribes the status of the U.S. economy
and how to improve it.
Tsongas said there are three ways
to reduce the deficit: raise taxes (on
cigarettes, alcohol and gasoline), cut
down on social programs and instate a
comprehensive entitlement means test
- the centerpiece of his plan. This test
would gradually reduce entitlement
payments to the 42 percent of Ameri-
can families whose income is above
$40,000.
Coalition members, including
Tsongas, travel across the country to

HAITI
Continued from page 1
U.S. Army Specialist Malcolm
Abel, one of the first soldiers to hit the
two-story FRAPH headquarters,
summed it up neatly as he prepared to
pull out.
"I guess we took care of the bad
part of the block," Abel said, beaming
and pumping with adrenaline. "I think
the Haitians who had mixed emotions
about us being here are going to be on
our side now."
A cheering mob of impoverished

.,.
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THE AMERICAN

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STORY

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I

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