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October 01, 1994 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-10-01

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The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, October 3, 1994 - 5

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FOOTBALLNOTEBOOK_
By RACHEL BACHMAN
and MICHAEL ROSENBERG
Daily Football Writers
IOWA CITY - Right tackle John Runyan sprained an ankle early
last week, so Thomas Guynes started in his place Saturday. Joe
Marinaro, sidelined the first three games of the season with a knee
ury suffered in spring practice, moved into Guynes' spot to start the
game.
Outside linebacker Matt Dyson was still recovering from surgery to
repair a broken bone in his foot. Michigan coach Gary Moeller says
Dyson is likely to play against Michigan State next weekend.
Offensive tackle Trezelle Jenkins stood in for injured captain
Walter Smith for the pregame coin toss. Smith tore his anterior cruciate
ligament in August and will sit out for the season.
Tight end Jay Riemersma bruised a thigh in the first half Saturday
and sat out the rest of the game. Right tackle Mike Sullivan suffered
m turf toe.
When backup tackle John Partchenko went out with a hurt shoulder
Sullivan went back in for him.
Defensive end Glenn Steele also hurt his knee in the fourth quarter.
Iowa tight end Scott Slutzker sprained his ankle in the fourth quarter.
IF, THEN ... : The two most important factors in winning a game are
turnovers, and the running game, Moeller said.
In Saturday's contest, Michigan outrushed Iowa 268 yards to 75.
Tyrone Wheatley had 182; Tshimanga Biakabutuka had 84. Iowa's
Sedrick Shaw had all of the Hawkeyes' yards.
The Wolverines won the turnover battle, too. Steve Morrison picked
* a Ryan Driscoll pass - his first of the game - and ran it 13 yards.
Late in the first half, Morrison recovered a Shaw fumble, taking it seven
yards.
Michigan fumbled twice, recovering the first. The second came when
tight end Pierre Cooper hesitated on a kickoff return, then let the ball
get away.
MAIZE AND BLUE ZEBRAS: For the second straight game, Michigan's
opponent complained of unfair officiating. Iowa was penalized eight
times for 85 yards, compared to four for 46 for Michigan.
"We had a lot of penalties on offense, and obviously that hurt us,"
*wkeye coach Hayden Fry said. Fry also expressed shock that Iowa
had several holding penalties "and Michigan didn't have one."
Actually, the Wolverines did have a holding penalty in the second
quarter.
Last week, Colorado receiver Michael Westbrook complained of
having to "play 11 against 15" because the officials were biased toward
Michigan. Westbrook seemed to make up for it, though.

Further injuries force offensive
to improvise; Dyson due back soon

GAME STATISTICS

PASSING
Player
Driscoll I
Tot. 1
RUSHING
Player
Shaw
Kahl
Driscoll
Filer
Totals

C-A
L9-37
9-37

Yds
196
196

TD
1
1

Att'
18
7
2
1
28

Yds Avg
75 4.2
14 2.0
(-)5(-)2.5
0 0
84 3.0

ift
L
1
Lg
12
9
0
12

RECEIVING

Player
Slutzker
Kahl
Jasper
Roussell
Dean
Guy
Banks
Shaw
Totals
PUNTING
Player
Gallery
Totals

No. Yds

6
4
2
2
2
1
191
No.
5;
5

63
25
56
20
16
15
9
(-)8
196

Avg Lg
10.520'-
6.319
28.0 40
10.011
8.0 9
15.0 15
9.09
10340

Yds Avg ig
193 38.6 48
193 38.6848

PUNT RETURNS

Offensive tackle John Partchenko grimaces in agony Saturday. The
leave the action.

sophomore injured his shoulder and was forced to

Player
Jasper
Dwight
Totals

No. Yds
1 12
1 5
2 17

Avg
12
5
12

Lg
12
5
12

ROSENBERG
tlnued from page 1
play-calling down the stretch of
games has sometimes been awful.
This is his biggest weakness as a
coach. Unfortunately, it is also the
most visible weakness a coach can
have. So Moeller gets hammered for
his play-calling, which everyone sees,
and is rarely praised for his
outstanding recruiting, which almost
y sees.
As for Fry, his teams have simply
lost some games in recent years they
had no business losing.
So Moeller and Fry are not perfect
at their professions.
Who is?
To fire either of them would be to
go against much of what their
universities are supposed to stand for.
y have worked hard. They have
n honest. They have been loyal.
Most of all, they have been
successful. Over their careers, these
men have been winners. Fry and

Moeller have not only done their best;
they have done better than almost
anybody else could do.
Moeller's teams have been among
the nation's top 10 over the past five
years.
Would you fire the head of the
Political Science Department if his
program was ranked among the
nation's top 10?
Fry, basically, is a victim of his
own sucess. Sixteen years ago a six-
win season would have been cheered.
Now it is a disappointment.
John Wooden, the most successful
coach in major college sports history,
won 10 national championships in 12.
years as UCLA's men's basketball
coach. In his last year, 1975, the
Bruins won the national title, a year
after falling to North Carolina State.
"Great win, coach," a booster told
Wooden after that final victory. "It
makes up for you letting us down last
year."
Wooden stopped coaching after
that game. It's a wonder anyone ever
starts anymore.

FIRST QUARTER:.
M - Hamilton 30-yard field goal
Drive: 4 plays, 6 yards,11:19
SECOND QUARTER:
U -Driscoll 1-yard run (Hurley kick)
Drive: 10 plays, 80 yards, 12:23
M - Wheatley 2-yard run (Hamilton kick)
Drive: 14 plays, 76 yards, 1:45
M - Hamilton 32-yard field goal
Drive: 4 plays, 2 yards, :34
THIRD QUARTER:
M - Biakabutuka 7-yard run (kick failed)
Drive: 5 plays, 45 yards, 8:49
M - Hamilton 32-yard field goal
Drive: 7 plays, 32 yards, 2:35
FOURTH QUARTER:
UI - Slutzker 11-yard pass from Driscoll (Hurley kick)
Drive: 9 plays, 58 yards, 14:11
M - Wheatley 12-yard run (Hamilton kick)
Drive: 11 plays, 77 yards, 6:56

M-Ul
3-0

KICKOFF
Player
Banks
Dwight
Williams
Totals

RETURNS
No. Yds Avg Lg
3 8026.7 31
2 32 16 25
1 11 11 11
6 12320.5 31

3-7
10-7

13-7
19-7
22-7
22-14
29-14

NATURAL
ontinued from page 1
wd to roar every time he touched
e ball. It was his name.
Each occasion "Biakabutuka"
came over the public address system
the crowd roared with delight.
"I guess my name just started ev-
erything," says Biakabutuka as he
flashes a smile as quick as he fakes a
linebacker trying to tackle him.
He knows plenty of other
Tshimanga's, including an uncle and
ousin, but the only Biakabutukas
he can think of are his family mem-
bers. That means quite a few people
with the indentical surname. He has
10 brothers and sisters - some of
whom remain in his native Zaire.
Their presence in that African
country, where political stability ri-
vals the steadiness of the San Andreas
Fault, causes Biakabutuka to worry.
His memories of Zaire are vague.
e remembers his house. He remem-
bers his best friend. Due to the politi-
cal tension, Biakabutuka and his fam-
ily immigrated to Quebec when he
was five. He has never been back to
Zaire.
"My mom's proof of what I re-

playing. He let her know he meant
American football.
Growing up in the province of
Quebec, Biakabutuka was exposed to
mostly French and developed his En-
glish skills by watching television. He
left Longueuil, Que., in order to attend
football tradition-rich Vanier, an En-
glish-speaking school in Montreal, in
1992. Although he could speak four
languages at the time (two African
dialects, French and English), he still
had problems with English.
"He was very quiet," Matuzewiski
says. "He wasn't boisterous. He sat
back and watched."
The old axiom of actions speaking
louder than words certainly held true
for Biakabutuka. He played only one
season for Vanier in the Quebec Col-
legiate Triple-A League, and oppo-
nents were thankful.
He gained over 1,300 yards on 140
carries, caught 15 passes for 200 yards,
averaged 20 yards per kickoff return
and scored 12 touchdowns. All in just
10 games.
The number collecting would have
continued but he injured his left shoul-
der in the final game. In addition to a
separated clavicle, he was hurting with
a sprained ankle. His absence in the
first playoff game greatly affected the

just to make sure Michigan was the
place he wanted to be.
It's been a good choice so far, with
one exception. If it wasn't against
Michigan's policy, he would like to
take off his helmet to celebrate a touch-
down.
"I like intimidations," he says as
he smiles once again. "I love that
confidence. I'll duck walk and point at
the other team. When I get off the field
I look at 'em and say 'Yeah, yeah, you
know we're coming. You shouldn't
have come here."'
Emotion is much of the reason
Biakabutuka enjoys playing football
but that pathos has its dark side. He'll
joke around, but when the kidding
becomes too much, the best advice
would be to leave the room because
Biakabutuka admits to having a short-
fuse.
One emotion that's not part of his
game is fear.
"I don't get scared on the field," he
confidently admits. "I don't know
anyone who gets scared. If they're
scared going out there, I don't think
they should play football."
Biakabutuka's fear may not ap-
pear when he scampers all about the
football field but did show up during
his job this past summer.

trimming the front, putting the mower
away and hanging out with his friends
about the neighborhood.
Besides his laziness, Biakabutuka
still holds on to his shyness. He does
not like being in public too much,
which makes his job choice at 15
years-old perplexing.
"I sold chocolate. They dropped
me somewhere at two in the afternoon
and picked you up at eight at night. I
quit after two days. It was hard work."
The real reason he sold chocolate
becomes apparent - he loves choco-
late. No matter what kind of choco-
late exists, Biakabutuka eats it -
brownies, fudge, white chocolate. He
ate three Hershey bars with almonds
after practice one night last week. He
might want to cut down on his splurges
now that his 6-foot-1,192-pound frame
consists of a grand seven percent of
body fat - the highest percentage he's
ever carried.
Sometimes eating a lot of chocolate
can become a bit much.
"One Easter, I ate a lot of choco-
late. I ate so much I got tired of the
taste. The taste was just burning my
tongue. I was just eating, eating, eat-
ing it."
Now the only people he makes
sick are the ones trying to tackle him.

"I don't like nicknames. Touch-
down Tim? That's silly."
He can score in a variety of ways.
He'll streak down the sideline. He'll
carry tacklers with him. Or he'll sim-
ply bowl you over, as he did against
the Hawkeyes.
Biakabutuka gave a little fake, was
hit, kept going, turned the corner,
pulled a tackler with him, ran toward
the goal line, bowled over another
Hawkeye in front of him on his way
into the end zone.
Even while playing at Vanier he
demonstrated the same skills.
"He had determination,"
Mateuwiski said. "He would not let
anyone else stop him."
"(The game) tests your strength,
courage and determination against
someone you've never seen before."
Biakabutuka says.
"You get to a point where your
body's tired and your hurting and
you're trailing behind. You've got to
realize you can win and break down
your opponent. I'm not a quitter."
Despite all the accolades,
Biakabutuka shuns the spotlight and
crowds, worrying about overexposure.
College football remains a mystery to
him. He doesn't understand why
106,000 people show up at Michigan

Fry

DEFENSE
Player
Diaco
Porter
Wilderman
Chambers
Ennis-Inge
Henlon
Bennett
McKinney
Coats
Boone
Robinson
Jackson
LaFleur

Tac
10
6
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
2

Ast
2
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
0

Tot-
12
10
6:
6-
5
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
2

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