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September 30, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-30

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 30, 1994

GIES
Continued from page 1
But when their hiding place was
discovered in 1944, the Franks and
their Jewish friends were sent to
Germanconcentration campus. Only
Frank's father, Otto, survived the
war.
Months after the war ended, Otto
Frank returned to Amsterdam, where
Gies gave him Frank's diary and other
papers left behind in the hiding place.
In 1947, "The Secret Annexe," was
first published. It later appeared in the
United States as "Anne Frank: The
Diary of a Young Girl."
"If it wasn't for her, the diary

would have never been published.
When she went back to the attic, she.
found the notebook, which was the
diary, and she kept it," Iutter said.
Gies, who was born in Austria in
1909 but moved to the Netherlands in
1920, still lives in Amsterdam.
Butter lived in the same neighbor-
hood as the Franks and also fled Ger-
many for Amsterdam like the Franks.
Butter also knew Anne Frank, but
Frank was older than her.
Like Frank, Butter also went to the
Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.
"It is unfortunate that contrary to
my own survival, her destiny did not
permit that," Butter said.
Established in 1985, the

Wallenberg Endowment funds the
University's annual lecture and medal
presentation, and provides support
each year for doctoral students whose
scholarly work is related to the goals
and values of the lectureship.
Previous Wallenberg lecturers
have included Nobel-laureate and
Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel; Jan
Karski, courier for the Polish un-
derground resistance during World
War II and an early witness to the
Holocaust; Helen Suzman, a long-
time South African legislator and
crusader against apartheid; and Bud-
dhist leader Tenzin Gyatso, 14th
Dalai Lama of Tibet and Nobel
Peace Prize winner.

Interviews with over fifty law school
admissions officers reveal:

How the admissions process really works
- How to write an effective personal statement
What makes a strong recommendation
Where to apply to maximize your chances for acceptance
How to prepare for the first year of law school - and beyond

Join Pat Harris Leading Expert in the Nation on Law School Admissions either day:
Saturday, October 1st 1pm - 4pm or Sunday, October 2nd 4pm " 8pm

Saturday - Kaplan Educational Center, 337 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor, Ml 48104
Sunday - Michigan Union, Pendleton Room
Limited Seating Available
Call 313/662-3149 to reserve your place and get an edge on the competition
Sponsored by:
Uindergraduate Law Club
& Haplail Educatioijal Cepters
UNDERGRADUATE LAW CLUB MASS MEETING
IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING SEMINAR
SUNDAY OCT.2ND, 7PM
Pat Harris will be available for questions following the meeting.

TUITION
Continued from page 1
According to the College Board,
average tuition across the country is
$11,709 at four-year private schools
and $2,686 at four-yearpublic schools,
both 6-percent increases over last year.
Although the increase was twice
the inflation rate, it was also the small-
est since 1989.
The University's rate is $5,457 for
lower-division in-state LSA students.
David Warren, president of the Na-
tional Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities, said health-care
benefits for members and staff account
for much of the tuition increases around
the country. Peterson echoed similar
sentiments about the University.
"The University is very labor-inten-
sive," Peterson said. "Costs in human
labor increase faster than other costs."
She said rising costs for tuition are
in part driven by health-care rate in-
creases for University employees.
Peterson asserted that University
tuition also rises faster than the national
average because the University has
many more programs and provides a
higher quality of education than most
schools around the country.
Since the University is a public in-
stitution, it depends on state appropria-
tions to supplement tuition income.
This year, state appropriations to
Religious
AVAVAVAVA
Episcopal Church at U of M
CANTERBURY HOUSE
518 E. Washington St.
(behind Laura Ashley)
SUNDAY: 5 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Followed by informal supper
All Welcome
665-0606
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER CHURCH
Worship: 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
2146 Moeller Ave. Ypsilanti
4854670 Pastor Henry J. Healey
CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
971-9150. Michael Caulk, pastor. Child
and adult Sunday School class at
9:30 a.m. Forsythe Middle School,
1655 Newport Rd.
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m. worship service.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
1423 Washtenaw (between South U. & Hill)
WORSHIP
SUNDAY: 9:45 am. Faith, Exploration
Discussions in French Room
over coffee and bagels
Worship: 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Brunch: 12 noon (Students Free)
THURSDAY: 5:30 p.m. Campus Worship (casual)
in Curtis Room
suppers following
Rev. Amy M. Heinrich, Campus Pastor
662-4466
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. English, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Korean
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive
Between Plymouth Rd. and Pontiac Trail
SUNDAY: Worship - 11 a.m.
Christian Education - 9:45 a.m.
A particular welcome to
North Campus students
Episcopal and Presbyterian Worship
on North Campus (Broadway at Baits Dr.)

NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway (at Baits Dr.) 663-5503
Two congregations committed to
inclusive welcoming community
SUNDAY : 8:30 Episcopal Holy Eucharist
9:30 Church School & Adult Education
11:00 Presbyterian Community Worship
11:00 Episcopal Holy Eucharist
Nursery Provided
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road, Ann Arbor
The Largest Student Group in Town
SUNDAY: Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship at 11 a.m.
Kevin Richardson, Campus Minister
For Transportation Call 971-0773
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 Packard Rd. 662-2449. Est. 1953.
Membership: 500. Ven. Douglas Evett &
Rev. Susan Bock. SUNDAY 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT VIARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson * 663-0557
(Corner of William and Thompson)
Weekend Liturgies
SATUjRAY: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 p.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions 4-5 p.m.
Curious about Neopagan Druidism?
Join us for workshops, rituals, etc.
Call SHINING LAKES GROVE,ADF
665-8428
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near Hill
SATURDAY: Worship 6:30 p.m.
SU.NDAY:~ Worship 10:30 a.m.

the University rose 2.3 percent, which
helped keep the annual tuition in-
creaseremain lower than in past years.
Over the past five years, a typical
student's tuition at the University has
risen 10.1 percent - the highest in-
crease in the Big Ten Conference.
During the previous two years, the
University received almost no in-
crease in state appropriations.
"In the early '80s, private college
tuition was going up at twice the rate
of inflation," King said.
King said state appropriations
around the country dropped in the late
1980s due to the recession. Then pub-
lic schools saw dramatic tuition hikes.
Peterson said since the University is
a research institution, the cost of tech-
nology puts it at a disadvantage when
the tuition is compared to other schools.
Yet some critics are not sympa-
thetic. "We're paying more and getting
less than we got 10 years ago," said
Stephanie Arelonio, president of the
U.S. StudentAssociation. "We'relearn-
ing from videotapes in some instances.
Class sizes have grown.... It would be
nice to see the professor sometime."
The proportion of their budgets
that colleges spent on instruction fell
within the last year from 32.4 percent
to 30.7 percent, according to the U.S.
Department of Education.
Government statistics also report
that the proportion of money used by
colleges for instruction, libraries and
maintenance is shrinking, and the
amount spent on public relations, mar-
keting and fund-raising is increasing.
"It raises the question of what edu-
cational institutions are here for," said
James Perley, a biology professor at
the College of Wooster in Ohio and
president of the American Associa-
tion of University Professors.
Warren said many of the increased
administrative costs are going to coun-
seling and job placement services,
which he said college students are
demanding.
Colleges must spend to promote
themselves in a competitive market,
said David Breneman, former presi-
dent of Kalamazoo College.

HEALTH
Continued from page 1
of Powell as president. "It might take
a Republican president to overcome
the opposition in his own party to
something like universal healthcare."
Associate Prof. Richard Lichtenstein
of the Department of Health Services
Management teaches a course on the
history of health care in America.
He said Clinton is not the first press
dent to attempt to change the health
delivery system. Jimmy Carter, Rich-
ard Nixon and Harry Truman have all
tackled the issue.
"It (is) very evident that we have
known about the problems which were
articulated by the Clinton administra-
tion for 60 years," Lichtenstein said.
Lichtenstein compared the prob-
lems of America's health system to-
cancer and said, "That cancer doesn
go away; it keeps growing.
"What I'm referring to is not only
cost of care, but also inequalities in
health status between different seg-
ments of the population. We have the
wrong types of physicians practicing
these days."
Lichtenstein accused the GOP of
scaring Congress from taking action.
Campbell agreed, saying Repub*
cans lacked the "burning desire" nec-
essary to make changes in the face of
entrenched interests.
"There are very, very heavy eco-
nomic stakes for some very powerful
institutions in American society on this
issue," Campbell said.
Despite those interests, the prob-
lems continue to fester. And piece-meal
efforts to solve the problem could
more harm than good, the experts say.
Lichtenstein said America cannot
simply expand coverage to the unin-
sured working poor without changing
the way health care is delivered.
"(A) lot of employers who employ
those low-income people and do give
them benefits now will cut them off
(saying) 'You might as well get it
from the Feds. Why should I pay fe
it?"' he said. "You wind up with mo
people at the public trough."

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FUTURE
Continued from page 1
"The effect that we've observed so
far was that grades did go up, and
people felt that they were getting much
more involved with the material."
One of the key benefits ofmultime-
dia software is interaction, allowing
the student to learn at their own pace, to
skip material that is familiar or repeat
confusing topics.
Edna Coffin, professor of modern
Hebrew and director of Project
FLAME (Foreign Language Appli-
cations in aMultimediaEnvironment),
believes interactive software, espe-
cially for large classes, allows for a
more personal instruction.
"If you engage somebody for 50
minutes - a classroom hour - if
there are 20 to 25 people in the class
- maybe each person gets a chance
of active participation one, two min-
utes of class," Coffin said. "In a mul-
timediaenvironment- which is com-
puter driven - you can engage them
actively for the 50 minutes. It's
multisensory, multichannel. You en-
gage all the senses."
Despite the praises course-related
software has received, the role of teach-
ers will still be an important one. Lec-
tures provide an outline of the material
while teachers and the software focus
on specific areas, Potter said.
Multimedia programs are not with-
out their share of problems. Demands
placed on the computer server by nu-

merous students can overload the sys-
tem. If there are computer troubles,
frustration and delays result.
Social Work Prof. Frank Maple dis-
covered that while he could teach con-
cepts, techniques and role-playing sce-
narios in his class, there is a greater
impact when students are present
with real-life situations.
"Once you get in an actual therapy
session, it's very different. The level
of emotional content is much more
real and pressing," Saunders said.
"So what he's done is taken video of
actual therapy sessions and brought it
into a computing environment,"
Saunders said. "Students watch those
video sessions on the screen and whe
the session stops at a particular poir
they are asked to give their intervention
- 'What would they say?' And some
of these sessions are so emotionally
packed. It's a way that they can sensi-
tize themselves to the real power of
what goes on in these therapy sessions."
But professors are not the only ones
developing and experimenting.
"Students are beginning to incor-
porate things other than the print
word in their work," Saunders said.
"Instead ofjustwritingapaperof words,
we're beginning to see animation, 3D
modeling, video and audio coming into
their work ... the 'multimedia term
paper' if you will."
The office is continuing to look at
ways instructors can improve the class-
room experience and the use of technol-
ogy in enhancing student performan

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NEWS - David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: James R. Cho, Nate Hurley, Mona Oureshi, Karen Taiaski.
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Stevens, Jean Twenge.
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