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September 23, 1994 - Image 15

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-23

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 23, 1994 -15

.Owner of cottage
where Gerulaitis
died lacked permit

* SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) -
The owner of the pool cottage where
tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis was found
dead of carbon monoxide poisoning
did not have an occupancy permit for
the bungalow.
Jon Foster, the Southampton Vil-
lage Building Inspector, said Wednes-
day an inspection was required for the
application permit, and an inspector
fight have discovered a problem in
the heating systems.
Investigators suspect a malfunc-
tion in one of the heating systems
used to heat the pool was the source of
the lethal carbon monoxide gas that
circulated into the cottage bedroom
killing Gerulaitis, 40, once one of the
world's best players.
Foster said the cottage on the
estate was listed only as a pool
*house.
"It was not allowed to be used for
cooking, heating or sleeping," he said.
In 1991, in an advertisement to
sell the estite, owner Martin Raynes
said his property included a guest
house. After seeing the ad, village
officials contacted Raynes, a real es-
tate developer, and told him to obtain

an occupancy certificate if he planned
to let anyone sleep there, Foster said.
Inspectors are waiting to further
inspect the cottage to determine if
there were any building code viola-
tions, Foster said.
A funeral is scheduled for Thurs-
day at St. Dominic's Roman Catholic
Church in Oyster Bay, near where
Gerulaitis owned a home.
Gerulaitis, ranked at one time as
high as No. 3 in the world, was one of
the most popular players in tennis.
"It's very sad," Pete Sampras
said, while in Goteborg for the United
States-Sweden Davis Cup. "He was a
close friend. He was always a very
generous person, he always cared
about me."
"Vitas was like a brother to me,"
Bjorn Borg told the Swedish paper
Aftonbladet. "It feels like I've lost
someone in my family."
Borg played a doubles match with
John Lloyd against Gerulaitis and
Jimmy Connors on Wednesday night
in the Champions Tour in Seattle. He
says he will try to attend Thursday's
funeral although he has a commit-
ment in Mexico City this weekend.

NORWAY
Continued from page 13
"Kansas City," said the older guy, the American Embassy mailman.
"Whoa!" said the kid. "You look like Ken Griffey, Jr.!"
After spending a couple Saturday mornings with these kids, and hearing
things like that, it's hard for me to go along with all the media people one
sees on television, spouting off about how the strike- especially if it runs
into the 1995 season- is going to do the game of baseball serious harm.
Those people are adults, and are almost necessarily pervaded by a certain
cynicism that comes with age.
And a certain forgetfulness, too. What these people are forgetting is
how strongly baseball grabs the imagination when you're young. Kids of
all ages,'from the small ones playing Little League to the big ones who play
in huge stadiums, dream of hitting that Series-winning grand slam or
recording that game-saving strikeout.
Sure, it's a pipe dream for most of us, but the infinitely small possibility
captivates us and keeps us on the diamond, and then lures us to the ballpark
when our own playing days are over, to live vicariously through our
favorite big leaguers.
I don't think people are going to stop going to games, even if the strike
continues and wipes out the 1995 season. For certain, the fans will be little
angry at both sides for taking away their game, but once the season starts,
the vast emerald-green fields of Camden Yard, Tiger Stadium and Wrigley
Field will call them back, not only to the ballparks, but maybe even to their
own childhoods, to a time when every field was a field of dreams.
That's the magic of baseball. Its spell cannot be broken by talk of salary
caps and free agency.
To the kids here in Norway (and most other places, I think), all of that
is just adultspeak, stuff that to them must seem almost childish, even
though kids, not multimillionaire adults, were the ones in mind when that
word was invented.
In a place where soccer is unquestionably king, the fact that more than
a hundred kids would come from miles around to play baseball is testament
to the joys and possibilities of the game, and the universality of these
things.
To me, standing in the blustery wind on that Norwegian field, the
message is clear: as long as there are kids playing baseball somewhere,
there's no need to worry about the future of the game. Baseball will
survive, just as sure as our heroic young dreams.

0 e
win against
EAST LANSING (AP) - It's a
matchup straight out of a bookie's
nightmare.
When Miami of Ohio visits Michi-
gan State on Saturday, the two teams
will take the field with a combined
record of 0-4-1.
Michigan State is coming off a
heartbreaking 21-20 loss to No. 9
Notre Dame. Next week, it starts Big
Ten play against defending league
and Rose Bowl champ Wisconsin,
now ranked No. 16.
And the 0-2 Spartans have a recent
history oflacklusterplay against smaller
schools, mainly 1991 and 1992 losses
at home to Central Michigan.
On top of all that, Miami (0-2-1)
has some speed and quickness on
offense, tools that have proven effec-
tive against Michigan State.
Michigan State coach George
Perles said he'll have to make sure his
team isn't drooping from the Notre
Dame loss or already looking ahead
to Wisconsin.
"No one jumps into their trou-
sers. And when everyone gets on
that field, if the breaks go the wrong

Spartans look for first

Miami
way, it can be a long afternoon for
anyone," he said.
Perles said no one has figured out
a way yet to bottle the emotion from
one game and have it ready for the
next.
"I wish we could, but it's a diffi-
cult thing to do. The reason it's diffi-
cult to do is one thing we can't do is
fool ourselves," he said. "We know
the circumstances out there and we
react to them with all the gray matter
we have.
"It's hard to do anything more
than be honest and that's what we
try to do in talking to the team."
Coach Randy Walker said his
Miami team has to cut down on its
mistakes after squandering a lead
last week against archrival Cincin-
nati and having to rally for a 17-17
tie.
Michigan State also has had
trouble with consistency. After tak-
ing first-half leads against Kansas and
Notre Dame, the Spartan offense
couldn't score in the second half and
the defense couldn't bottle up the
opposition.

i

*Bettman says NHL won't go way of baseball

NEW YORK (Al) - NHL com-
missioner Gary Bettman, pointing to
baseball's ruptured season, said
Thursday the league will not start its
season without a labor contract.
He said the NHL will lock out the
players if a collective bargaining
agreement is not reached by Oct. 1,
opening night of the league's 78th
season.
"This is very difficult, but the ab-
sence of acollective bargaining agree-
ment leaves us no choice," he said. "A
CBA in place is essential to the long-
term health of the league.
"We want a season without dis-
traction, without interruption. Thebest
thing would be to put some pressure
on both parties to get a deal going."
Bettman, speaking by conference
call, said the possibility of a players'
strike during the season was "very
strong" without a contract.
"All we have to do is look at base-
ball," Bettman said. "Or what hap-
pened two years ago."
Bettman was referring to 10-day
strike by NHL players, also over a
new contract.
"There's no secret the players'
leverage increases as the season goes
on," he said. "(No CBA) would be a
disaster."
"I don't know if the. season is at
risk," Bob Goodenow, executive di-
rector of the NHL Players Associa-
tion, said. "I can tell you that part of
the season is at risk."
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Bettman's announcement was not
unexpected. He had been given a man-
date over the summer from the
league's owners to lock out the play-
ers.
"I have had the authority for some
time," he said. "There was no shock
on that side of the table."
On Monday, negotiators from the
NHL and union are to resume bar-
gaining in Toronto.
"If we work hard, there's enough
time to make a deal by Oct. 1," Bettman
said. "It's not impossible, but as time
slips away, it's harder and harder. It will
be difficult and arduous."
Goodenow, speaking during his
own conference call, said the players
will continue to finish the exhibition
season as scheduled.
"That's our plan," he said. "Our
plan was to come to camp in a profes-
sional manner. The work ethic has
been great and the competition has
been great. That's our format and
that's what we'll continue with."
Goodenow said the players were
upset with Bettman's rollback man-

date that cost the players their train-
ing camp benefits. That issue would
have to be addressed in the negotia-
tions.
"It would be most difficult to play
(the season under that mandate),"
Goodenow said. "It has not pleased
the players at all."
If the start of the season is post-
poned, Bettman said he does not con-
sider the move a lockout. Asked what
the difference was, Bettman said:
"Once we get this behind us, we in-
tend to get the full season in."
Bettman said he hoped to get in all
84 regular-season games. There was
a possibility some games could be
lost if the postponement continued
deeper in the season.
"That would have to be evaluated
on a day-to-day basis," Bettman said.
Over the past two days, Bettman
and Goodenow met for a total of 12
hours and both came away from those
negotiations with nothing positive to
say.
Among the major issues, owners
are looking for a system that links

salaries to revenue. Players want a
free market and more liberalized free
agency, among other things. Both
sides have submitted complicated tax
proposals to help small-market teams.
This has been amajor stumbling block
in the negotiations.
The NHL and the union have been
without a contract since Sept. 15,
1993. Their negotiations have inten-
sified over the past week when they
met four times in six days.
If the season doesn't begin on time,
it would be the second interruption in
the NHL since the 1991-92 regular-
season ended a weekearly when play-
ers went on strike April 1 over a
number of issues, including free
agency and sharing of non-hockey
revenues. The issues were settled and
the postseason was played.

FRA

04
aw

a

RUSH SCHEDULE FALL

1994

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