100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1994 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 23, 1994

BOSNIA
Continued from page 1
"We have no final report on dam-
ages," Branston said. "The (U.S.) can-
non fire was thought to have missed,
but the 1,000-pound bombs hit on or
very near to the target."
He said no casualties were thought
to have been incurred on the Bosnian
Serb side because the tank was cho-
sen by LaPresle "on the basis that
there would be no loss of life, because
there had been no loss of life on the
U.N. side."

HAITI
Continued from page 12
Clinton was willing to give.
When Clinton dispatched Carter,
retired Gen. Colin L. Powell and Sen.
Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), to make one final
diplomatic attempt to head off an
imminent invasion, the president said
the delegation could only discuss the
"modalities" by which Cedras,
Biamby and Lt. Col. Joseph-Michel
Francois, the Port-au-Prince police
chief, would surrender power and
leave Haiti.

The president said the three must
go - the only question was whether
their departure would be peaceful or
as a result of military force.
Instead of sticking to his narrow
mandate, Carter negotiated a deal that
called for the three officers to retire
from the military by Oct. 15. But it let
them remain in their posts during the
interim and it did not require them to
leave the country. The agreement also
seemed to promise an immediate lift-
ing of the economic embargo im-
posed by the U.N. Security Council.
Clinton accepted the Carter plan
because it allowed American forces to

ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR
WHY IS SIGNET BANK CARD HIRING ENGINEERRS?
COME SEE US 10:00AM - 4:00PM
SEPTEMBER 26TH

Signet Kank Card is an equal opporunity vrnpiover and encurages women and minorities to appiv. Sgnet promotesa drug-tree workplace.

College Recruiting-CL
Signet Bank Card, Attn: 12061-0430
P.O. Box 85525, Richmond, VA 23285-5525
1-800-RECRUIT

sIGNCTA
BANK CARD

enter Haiti unopposed and because
it permitted Aristide to regain the
presidency within a little less than a
month.
But, administration officials said
yesterday, the president ordered State
Department lawyers to probe the pact
for possible loopholes.
Religious
Services
AVAVAUVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421662-2402
(one block south of CCRB)
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
10 a.m.- "Befriending Each Other as a
Means of Education"
6 p.m.- No Service
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. Meeting of "
The University Group"
Fun, food, provocative discussion
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Lisa de Boer, ministry to students
Episcopal Church at U of M
CANTERBURY HOUSE
518 E. Washington St.
(behind Laura Ashley)
SUNDAY: 5 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Followed by informal supper
All Welcome
665-0606
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER CHURCH
Worship: 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.
2146 Moeller Ave. Ypsilanti
485-4670 Pastor Henry J. Healey
EYE OF THE SPIRAL
A student group for exploring Earth
based religions & Goddess spirituality
THURSDAY: Informal meetings 9 p.m.
Guild House Ministry, 802 Monroe
Call 998-0725 or e-mail
Jahna.otterbacher~um.cc.umich.edu
Fall Equinox Celebration
Friday, September 23,1994
CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
971-9150. Michael Caulk, pastor. Child
and adult Sunday School class at
9:30 a.m. Forsythe Middle School,
1655 Newport Rd.
SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. worship service.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
1423 Washtenaw (between South U. & Hill)
WORSHIP
SUNDAY: 9:45 a.m. Faith, Exploration
Discussions in French Room
over coffee and bagels
Worship: 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Brunch: 12 noon (Students Free)
THURSDAY: 5:30 p.m. Campus Worship (casual)
in Curtis Room
supers following
Rev. Amy M. Heinrich, Campus Pastor
662-4466
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. English, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Korean
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.), 668-7622
SNDAY Worship 10 a.m.
"Afterword" following with lunch
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study 6 p.m.
Evening Prayer 7 p.m.
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive
Between Plymouth Rd. and Pontiac Trail
SUNDAY: Worship -11 a.m.
Christian Education - 9:45 a.m.
A particular welcome to
North Campus students
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road, Ann Arbor
The Largest Student Group in Town

SUNDAY: Bible Study 9:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship at 11 a.m.
Kevin Richardson, Campus Minister
For Transportation Call 971-0773
Episcopal and Presbyterian Worship
on North Campus (Broadway at Baits Dr.)
NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway (at Baits Dr.) 663-5503
Two congregations committed to
inclusive welcoming community
UNDAY :l 8:30 Episcopal Holy Eucharist
9:30 Church School & Adult Education
11 Combined Presbyterian-Episcopal
Nursery Provided
ST, CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2309 Packard Rd. 662-2449. Est. 1953.
Membership: 500. Ven. Douglas Evett &
Rev. Susan Bock. SUNDAY 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
331 Thompson * 663-0557
(Corner of William and Thompson)
Weekend Liturgies
SATURDAY: 5 p.m.
SUNAX8Y::30 p.m., 10 a.m.,12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions 4-5 p.m.
Curious about Neopagan Druidism?
Join us for workshops, rituals, etc.
Call SHINING LAKES GROVE,ADF
665-428
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPL LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near Hill
,"IL :X Worship 6:30 p.m.
C! XT Vt r.*.1*... ti. 1 MIA efa.w

EMPLOYMENT
Continued from page 2.
said, sexual harassment is bound to
exist.
"There are many power relation-
ships, for example, between faculty
and students," he said.
The University has had a policy
on sexual harassment since 1980. It
was revised in December 1993.
"The new policy is more detailed,"
said Cringle. "The University's com-
mitment to fighting sexual harass-

ment is not new. This is just an im-
provement."
The Affirmative Action office is
currently reviewing applications.
Funding for these positions will come
from the Human Resources and Af-
firmative Action budget.
Cringle said these positions will
have a more direct effect on facu
and staff than on students.
"There are already people in place
to assist students who face these prob-
lems," he said, including counseling
services.

VIOLENCE
Continued from page 2S
"I always wondered in the back of
my mind, if that day was going to be
the day someone did really something
serious to us," he said.
Many incidents of workplace vio-
lence were mentioned at the meeting.
Arson, verbal threats, stalking, do-
mestic violence, property destruction,
and threatening letters, phone calls
and e-mail were all brought up.
Bruhnsen said the violators were
often individuals with emotional prob-
lems. He added that many had pro-
duced warning signs that had been
ignored.
"The stuff we deal with makes the
post office look weak," one attendee
of the meeting said.
Bruhnsen said the impact of work-
place violence stretches beyond the
individuals directly involved. They
take the stress home to their families.
Others in the work unit can be af-
fected by the stress of the situation,
bringing down productivity.
Incidents of workplace violence
occur regularly on campus. National
attention is only given to those with
dramatic results.
The University has experienced
several large-scale workplace vio-
lence incidents. Among them was the
fatal shooting of Dr. John Kemink of
the University Hospitals.
"Homicide is an extreme. These
incidents happen every day," said
Director of Human Resources Bruce
Pringle.
Several serious incidents have re-

main anonymous.

B

cently occurred on campus.
One incident involved a dis-
gruntled employee who got drunk and
shot at the Fleming Administration
Building at 3 a.m. with an automatic
firearm.
Another incident involved an an-
gry prospective student threatening
employees of the admissions office
with a knife.
"Ann Arbor is not a small comm.
nity. We experience quite a few is-
sues of violence. The goal of this
project is to make people safe,"
Bruhnsen said.
Director of Public Safety Leo
Heatley said, "DPS is always first on
the scene in these cases. I would like
to see my department do more work
for prevention and not just interven-
tion."
The panel offered suggestions fa
individuals facing workplace vio-
lence:
E If the situation escalates to an
emergency, call 911.
Do not confront the individual.
Make a supervisor aware of the situ-
ation.
Contact a personnel representa-
tive for help.
The panel added that the new Can@
pus Safety Handbook has a list of
guidelines to follow in the event of
workplace violence.
The panel will hold its third open
meeting Wednesday, Sept. 28 in the
Michigan Room of the Michigan
Union at 10 a.m. Anyone can, and is
encouraged to share their experiences.
All individuals in attendance may re-

I

MYERS
Continued from page 2.
House's inner circles. Some outsid-
ers have also said as the chief spokes-
woman she reinforced the image of
the White House as a preserve of the
young and inexperienced.
A stalwart of the 1992 Clinton
presidential campaign, Myers has
been one of the best-liked members
of the White House staff for her good
humor and quick wit. Panetta's long
and public deliberations over her fate
anguished her friends, particularly as
she was forced to answer questions
about her possible ouster in the daily
briefings.
"It's just a shame the way it was
handled," said one staff member. "She
is just one of the best people around
here, amazingly devoid of ego and all
that stuff."
1 Myers' resignation, which follows
the departure of several other top fe-
'male aides in the White House, is
likely to cause some discomfort for
an administration that has boasted of
its gender and racial diversity. Myers'
was the White House's first female
press secretary, although she never
occupied the press secretary's tradi-
tional office, which was filled by her
boss, Gearan.
As recently as yesterday morning,

many White House staff members
expected that she would be given big-
ger responsibilities and greater ac-
cess, and would retain at least soe
briefing role. But Myers did not wai
any change in her current responsi-
bilities an chose to resign instead.
She has been pursued for several
outside jobs, including one as co-host
of the CNBC network show "Equal
Time," with former Republican party
spokeswoman Mary Matalin. Myers
has been Matalin's choice for the job,
which would probably double 16
current $100,000 salary.
But she has also said recently she
wouldliketoreturntoCalifornia, where
she worked for Democratic Sen.Dianne
Feinstein during Feinstein's senatorial
campaign, and for former Los Angeles
Mayor Tom Bradley.
Rumors about the impending an-
nouncement again roiled the White
House yesterday as Panetta talked to
staff members one by one. 0
Myers' regular briefing was first
delayed, then cancelled altogether.
In his new choice for the job,
Clinton is turning to an experienced
Washington hand. The 39-year-old
McCurry was earlier the spokesman
for the 1992 presidential campaign of
Sen. Bob Kerrey, D-Neb., and the
1988 presidential campaign of Bruce
Babbitt, now Interior secretary.

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745.967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
Winter term (January through April) is $95, year-long (September through April) is $160. Oncampus
subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 76-DAILY: Arts 7630379; Sports 747-3336: Opinion 764.0552
Circulation 7640558; Classified advertising 7640557; Display advertising 764.0554; Billing 764.0550.
I * A - . .0.rI 0
NEWS David Shep*son, Mutaging Editor
EDITORS: James R. Cho, Nate Hurley, Mona Oureshi, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, Cathy Boguslaski, Lisa Dines, Sam T. Dudek, Josh Ginsberg, Ronnie Glassberg, Katie Hutchins, Michelle
Joyce, Maria Kovac, Frank C. Lee, Andrea MacAdam, James M. Nash, Zachary M. Raimi, Shari Sitron, Andrew Taylor,
Michelle Lee Thompson, Maggie Weyhing, Josh White, April Wood. Scot Woods.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Berndt (Editor), AndrewTaylor. Julie Tsdi.
EDITORIAL sam GoCistein,Fint Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker. Patrick Javid.
STAFF: Eugene Bowen, Craig Greenberg. Jed Friedman, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Jason Lchtstei, Walter PeikeI. Allison
Stevens, Jean Twenge.
SPORTS Chad A. Safran, Ma"ging Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest, Antoine Pitts, Michael Rosenberg.
STAFF: Paul Barger, Roderick Beard, Eugene Bowen, Scott Burton. Ryan Cuskaden, Marc Diller, Jennifer Duberstein, Darren
Everson, Ravi Gopal, Dan McKenzie, Rebecca Moatz, Melanie Schuman, Tom Seeley, Brian Sklar, Tim Smith, Barry
Sollenberger, Doug Stevens, Michelle Lee Thompson, Ryan White, Heather Windt.
ARTS Melissa Roes Ber iwdo, Tom Erftwine, Editors
EDITORS: Matt Carlson (Fine Arts), Jason Carroll (Theater), Kirk Miller (Books), Heather Phares (Music), Liz Shaw (Weekend
etc.), Alexandra Twin (Film). Ted Watts (Weekend, etc.).
STAFF: Jordan Atlas, Nicole Baker. Thomas Crowley, Andy Dolan, Ben Ewy, Johanna Flies, Josh Herrington, Kristen
Knudsen, Karen Lee, Scott Plagenhoef, Mami Raitt, Dirk Schulze, Sarah Stewart.
PHOTO Evan Petrie, Editor

:I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan