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September 13, 1994 - Image 13

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-09-13

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 13, 1994- 13

VOLLEYBALL NOTEBOOK
O'Donnell registers big
weekend for chian
By TOM SEELEY
Daily Sports Writer
After being slowed by a back injury for most of the early season games,
junior middle blocker Suzy O'Donnell really found her groove.
She averaged 18.7 kills and 4.3 blocks per game in the three games over
the weekend - a loss to Michigan State and victories over Virginia and
Pittsburgh. Her 28 kills in the win over Pittsburgh were a season-best for
Michigan.
"If there was an all-tournament team, she would have been on it,"
Michigan coach Greg Giovanazzi said. "The big evolution that has
*happened with Suzy's game is that she has become a lot more efficient
hitting.
"When she feels like things aren't right, she doesn't make errors
anymore, she just keeps it in play. And obviously, when you keep things
in play good things can happen and when you make errors, good things
:gn't happen."
SERVING UP SUCCESS: One of the biggest turnarounds for the Wolverines
this weekend was the success of their serving game.
After committing a season-worst 19 service errors last Thursday against
Eastern Michigan, the team opened up this weekend's Kaepa Volleyball
Challenge with only 10 service errors in Friday-night's loss to Michigan State.
'he trend continued on Saturday when the team notched seven aces in each of
its two wins.
"One of the things that is inherent in my philosophy is that we have to serve
thugh as a team," Giovanazzi said. "And when a team is this young, you have
td stomach errors in the beginning of the year, and I anticipate that as the year
goes on, we're going to see the aces overtake the errors."
FORMER CARDINAL TAKES OFF: Sophomore transfer Colleen Miniuk
continued her hot-hitting ways over the weekend as she collected 23 kills in
the loss to Michigan State on Friday night and 14 in each of the team's two wins
on Saturday.
oMiniuk, who is playing in her first season for the Wolverines after
transferring from Stanford, led the team with a 3.9 kills per game average in
the four games before this weekend's tournament. Those four games included
a loss to Stanford in which she recorded a match-high 12 kills against her
-ormer teammates.
ONE UP, ONE DOWN: While this weekend's first victories were a welcome
sight, they may end up costing the Wolverines in the long run. Senior captain
Aimee Smith missed Saturday evening's match against Pittsburgh after
injuring her knee earlier in the day in the victory over Virginia.
However, Michigan will soon regain the services of sophomore outside
"hitter Kristen Ruschiensky who has missed the last four matches due to
injury. Ruschiensky was a starter while she was healthy and should figure
prominently in the Wolverines' offense.
MORE MIDDLE MAGIC: O'Donnell's midcourt companion, junior Shannon
Brownlee also played a key role in the Wolverine attack this weekend as she
averaged 14.7 kills per game over the three-game span.
The London, Ont. native also sparkled on the defensive end as she averaged
1.7 blocks per game and 18.3 digs per game over the same span.

Former Wolverine out
with broken collarbone

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) - An-
thony Carter's impressive start with
the Detroit Lions has taken a turn for
the worse, as a broken collarbone
threatens to keep him out for at least
six weeks.
Carter, a key veteran addition to a
promising wide receiving corps, suf-
fered a broken collarbone and scapula
during Sunday's 10-3 loss at Minne-
sota. He is expected to miss six to
eight weeks and possibly more.
"The big concern is Anthony,"
Lions Coach Wayne Fontes said Mon-
day. "When he came down, he got
right back up and went in the huddle.
He went out and ran another pattern.
But I'm glad we didn't throw him the
ball because I don't know if he could
have put his arms up to catch it."
Carter, in his 10th NFL season,
sustained the injury on his first and
only reception of the game -an 18-
yard gain over the middle in the
second quarter. It was his first game
at the Metrodome after playing the
previous nine seasons with the Vi-
kings.
The Lions not only lose one of
their top possession receivers but one
of quarterback Scott Mitchell's main
targets.
Carter, signed by the Lions as an
unrestricted free agent on June 9,
caught five passes for 61 yards and

two touchdowns in Detroit's season-
opening 31-28 overtime victory over
Atlanta. His second touchdown - a
15-yard pass from Mitchell with 30
seconds left in the fourth quarter -
forced the extra period.
"It's a tough loss," Mitchell said.
"I think we're still growing as an
offense,-and we're just going to have
to adjust and learn from this."
Receiver Johnnie Morton, the Li-
ons' first-round draft choice out of
Southern California, was not active
for Sunday's game. He watched from
the sideline in street clothes. With
Carter out, he could be in uniform for
Monday's game at Dallas.
"I'm going to do one of two
things," Fontes said. "We'll move
Morton back to the outside (receiver)
and join him with Brett Perriman and
Herman Moore, or we'll move Brett
outside and go with Brett, Aubrey
(Matthews) and Herman.
"I'll look at it all week and I'll
decide which way I want to go for the
Monday night game."
Matthews replaced Carter Sunday
and had three catches for 35 yards.
Carter was a three-time consensus
All-American at the University of
Michigan (1980-82) before playing
three seasons in the USFL, two with
the Michigan Panthers and one with
the Oakland Invaders.

Sophomore outside hitter Colleen Miniuk is averaging 3.9 kills per game.

NLRB awards NFL players
$30 million for 1987 strike

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WASHINGTON (AP) - T
National Labor Relations Board sa
Monday it is awarding NFL player
record $30million in backpay arisi
from the 24-day strike in 1987.
"The $30 million constitutes t
largest back pay award in the histo
of the agency," the NLRB said.
The association had sought rest
ration of wages and bonus incentiv
lost when the NFL Manageme
Council that year refused to allo
players to play in games on the wee
end of Oct. 18-19 - after they h
unconditionally ended the walkout
NLRB general counsel Fr
Feinstein said in a statement Mond
that 1,300 players will share in t
award that includes backpay, bonus
and interest.
The litigation arose in 1987, bas
upon charges filed with the agency I
the players association.
The central charge alleged that t]
Management Council and the tear
had "unlawfully refused to allow r
turning striking players to participa
in the games immediately followin

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the end of the strike," Feinstein said.
The owners had adopted a rule
about two weeks into the strike that
required that any player wanting to
return and play in a Sunday or Mon-
day game immediately following a
settlement or end of strike had to
report back to work by 1 p.m. on the
previous Wednesday.
Replacementplayers could be signed
to play in Sunday games as late as 4p.m.
on the Saturday before the games and in
Monday night games as late as 4p.m. on
the same day. The complaint noted that
the players had unconditionally ended
the strike on Oct. 15.

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