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March 22, 1994 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-22

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Softball
Cal-State Sacramento Invite.
Thursday, all day
Sacramento, Calif.

S

'TS

Men's Swimming and Diving
NCAA Championships
Thursday, all day
Minneapolis

Wolverines swept
by Arizona State

Golfers struggle in first
tournament afterb a

By SCOTT BURTON
DAILY BASEBALL WRITER
Going into its three-game series
with Arizona State, Michigan's base-
ball team was concerned first and
foremost with one thing - the Sun
Devils' formidable offense.
However, it was not only Arizona
State's hitting thatproved to bedeadly,
but also its pitching. The often erratic
staff held the Wolverines to 14 hits,
earning a three-game sweep - 8-0
Friday, 8-1 Saturday and 12-4 Sun-
day.
"We didn'tplay wellat all," Michi-
gan coach Bill Freehan said. "Defen-
sively and offensively we were poor.
We had been swinging the bats well,
but we didn't this weekend."
Michigan had its best effort in
Sunday's loss, chasing ASU starter
Mike Corominas in the fifth inning
after cutting the Sun Devils' lead to 4-
3. Michigan sophomore leftfielder
Scott Weaver provided two of those
RBIs, and the Wolverines took ad-
vantage of three Arizona State errors
to score an unearned run.
However, reliever Kaipo Spencer
(4-0) snuffed out the Wolverines'
fifth-inning rally and held Michigan
to only one more run the rest of the
way to pick up the win. Despite 10
hits, the Wolverines could not pro-
duce any more runs. For the Wolver-
ines, Brian Simmons and Andy Wade
knocked in the other Michigan runs.
"He's a fastball, change-up kind
of guy," Arizona State pitching coach
Bill Kinneberg said. "He throws pretty
hard, and for a freshman, he's going
to be a talent by the time he's done
here."
The Sun Devils cleaned up on
Michigan starter Ron Hollis (0-3),
scoring seven runs in five innings off
the junior. They scored three more off
Chris Newton in the eighth and two

more off senior Aaron Toth in the
ninth. Designated hitter Todd Cady
smacked a double and a home run to
knock in three of the runs.
In Saturday's game, the Michigan
bats were rendered impotent by Ari-
zona State starter Billy Neal. Neal (3-
2) allowed five walks, a hit to Matt
Ferullo and one unearned run in seven
innings to pick up a win. Noah Perry
closed the game out with two perfect
innings.
"Billy was able to throw strikes
with three of his pitches, and his best
pitch is a changeup, so we had the
Michigan hitters a little off-balanced
at times," Kinneberg said. "Anytime
that you are in a college baseball
game - I don't care who you are
playing - if you get a shutout, or
allow very few hits against you, you
are surprised."
Freshman Jason Bond (3-1)
equaled Neal's mastery of Michigan's
bats in Friday's game, tossing no-hit
ball through seven before Weaver
stroked a hit. Bond finished with six
strikeouts and two hits allowed in
eight innings for the win. He also
picked up the shutout.
Weaver and Ryan Van Oeveren
claimed the other two hits Friday
night.
"He's basically our number one
guy," Kinneberg said. "For a fresh-
man, he is really a poised and talented
kid. He was able to get ahead of hit-
ters with his fastball and mix in his
curveball, and he was effective with
both pitches."
Michigan must now regroup as it
heads into its first conference con-
tests. The Wolverines head to
Bloomington this weekend for four
tough games against Indiana. The
Hoosiers finished fourth in the Big
Ten last season and return a solid
pitching staff.

By REBECCA MOATZ
FOR THE DAILY
A 12th-place finish was not in the
Michigan women's golf team's plans
as the Wolverines participated in their
first tournament after spring break
training.
"We are going to write it off, like
we didn't play in the tournament,"
said Michigan coach Cathy Teichert
in reaction to the team's finish in the
Northern Illinois University Snow-
bird Intercollegiate Tournament.
The two-day tournament at
Pebblecreek Country Club in Tampa,
Fla. did not result in the confidence
builder that the team was looking for.
Lead by Tiffany McCorkel, in the
first round, the Wolverines ranked
sixth after 18 holes of play, with a
score of 331. McCorkel was named
one of the top-10 individual golfers
after the first day of play, tying for
12th with 79 strokes.
However, the second round of the
tournament proved to be fateful for
the Wolverines. Michigan dropped to
12th place in the final standings after
shooting a 361 its second time around
the course.
The team finished with a com-
bined score of 692, a whopping 68
shots behind tournament winner Iowa
State's 624 strokes. Indiana followed
closely behind the Cyclones with a
633.
"There are no excuses," a disap-
pointed Teichert said. "It was a bad
day. We didn'tkeep(the ball)inplay."

After the first round of play,
Teichert felt that the team could have
improved upon its sixth place rank-
ing, -but luck was not on the
Wolverine's side.
"We tried to put too much pres-
sure on ourselves," said freshman
Wendy Westfall, who lead the team
with a score of 168. "The last three or
four holes ... we let them slip away."
Westfall ended the first day with M
an 83 and followed with an 85 in the
second round. McCorkel ranked sec-
ond on the team with an overall 172,
while Tegan McCorkel and Jenny
Zimmerman tied for third with a 176.
One factor in the Wolverines' loss
may have been the team's adjustment
to real grass. After practicing on mats
since spring break, the team had to
adapt to the natural grass. Other fac-
tors, such as the windy weather, the
team's poor play and the quality of
the opponents, especially from Big
Ten foe Indiana, can not be over-
looked.
"You can practice all you want,
but you don't know how you will hold
up until you get on the course,"
Westfall said.
With increased practice on put-
ting and chipping, as well as a confi-
dence boost, the Wolverines expect
better results in their next outing at
the Indiana Women's Invitational
April 2-3.
"You get better as time goes on,"
Teichert said. "We tried really hard
and the more you try..."

, :

i i
SPORTS INFORMATION
Michigan rightfielder Rodney Goble went 1-for-3 and scored two runs in
Sunday's 12-4 Wolverine loss at the hands of Arizona State.

Michigan
ASU
Michigan
ASU
Michigan
ASU

000
301
000
100
101
100

000
004
010
300
010
330

Friday
000- 0
OOX - 8
Saturday
000-1
40X -8
Sunday
001-4
32X -12

3 4
14 0
1 2
12 3
10 2
13 3

WINGI T!.AT
0 esT7A URA NI 0 i O NT$@A

150 Wings
$3.25/Pitcher
Any Bud Family
1220 S. University

'EXercise Room " Study Lounge *TV Lounge
Computer -om "Laundry faciities
24 fkourAttendedLobby " game Room
Hfeat anduWater Induled
Universiy Towers ApartmentL
536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
761-2680

6i65-7777

!
i

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THE FFFF OR TH- eFVIN WFEK PROGR AM I SS 4500 WHICH INCLUDES tuition and

,: '

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