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March 18, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-18

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 18, 1994
Israelis admit to fing on Arabs in massacre

JERUSALEM -Two Israeli sol-
diers admitted yesterday that they fired
at Arabs fleeing the Feb. 25 mosque
massacre in Hebron, and raised the
possibility that sharpshooter Baruch
Goldstein, the Brooklyn-born physi-
cian from the nearby settlement of
Kiryat Arba, had an accomplice.
Their testimony before the Israeli
inquiry commission into the shooting
contradicts the official Army version,
which claimed that no Palestinians
were shot by anyone, and lends weight
to some of the Palestinian survivors'
accounts about the events.

The two soldiers, guards at the
Tomb of the Patriarchs the day of the
shooting, said they saw Goldstein
enter the mosque with an American-
designed M-16 automatic rifle, not an
Israeli-made Galilrifle the Army said
was used in the shooting. A few min-
utes later, they said, another settler
came in with a Galil.
Both Jews and Arabs pray at the
Tomb of the Patriarchs, and Jewish
settlers carried their weapons unchal-
lenged into the hall.
The soldiers' testimonies suggest
Goldstein had assistance from another

person, or at least switched weapons
with someone else.
Numerous Palestinian witnesses
have said at least one worshipper was
killed and others wounded by sol-
diers in the mosque area during the
chaos of massacre, and swore that
Goldstein was assisted by another
man; several said the other man was
dressed in a white shirt and blue jeans.
Eyewitnesses had contended that
Israeli soldiers fired at fleeing Arabs
to impede the exit of hundreds of
worshippers trying to escape
Goldstein.

TUITION
Continued from page 1
The committee attempted to deter-
mine why the general fund and tuition
costs had been rising so rapidly.
The report states, "Themost signifi-
cant cause of cost inflation at the Uni-
versity is increasing noninstructional
expenses, apd thene in order of sig-
nificance is dediing productivity.
Kaplan explained that University
administration at all levels should work
toward capping its growth.
The study also cited the report of the
1990 Committee on the Economic Sta-
tus of Faculty - a committee consist-
ing of faculty members that reports

annually to the regents. The report stated
that administrative personnel and sal-
ary costs were rising more rapidly than
for faculty.
The CESF study found that from
1985 to 1990, the percentage increase
in non-instructional staff had more than
doubled that of instructional staff -
22.7 percent vs. 10.7 percent.
Kaplan said one option would be
freezing tuition, but only after cutting
administrative expenses.
Richard Kennedy, vice president
for government affairs, said the Univer-
sity may receivemore state funding, but
the amount of funding is still in ques-
tion.
"Tuition has had to carry the lion's

Read Daily S - TS

share of the burden," Kennedy said.
"We hope to eek away from always
depending on tuition."
He said, however, that freezing tu-
ition could be detrimental to the Uni-
versity community.
"(Freezing tuition hikes) is feasible
if you don't give a damn aboutquality,"
Kennedy said.
Michigan Student Assembly Vice
President Brian Kight disagreed.
"If we continue increasing tuition,
the quality of students will decline,"
Kight explained. "Good students with
limited resources are going to say it's
not worth coming to the University."
Ralph Loomis, English professor
emeritus and AAUP member, urged
the University to seriously consider the
report.
"I think the administration and re-
gents should consult with the commit-
tee. I hope they take the study into
account."
Admissions Director Theodore
Spencer told the regents in December
that as tuition rises, the amount and
number of financial awards to students
similarly increase.
Kaplan agreed that the University
should continue shifting funds to finan-
cial aid. "The increase in scholarships
had helped reduce the hardship of stu-
dents."
Baker, who has consistently voted
against tuition increases, said that de-
spite the increase in financial aid, the
University will have to deal with fi-
nances that affect its students.
"Higher education is going to have
to address the issue of cost, restructur-
ing and the financial needs of students
soon," Baker said.

A group of bagpipers perform in the first annual St. Patrick's Day parade on Cross Street in Ypsilanti.

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