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March 17, 1994 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-17

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8 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 17, 1994

Laxers prepared to
halt Bronco stampede

Western clinging to
slim NCAA hopes

By WILL McCAHILL
DAILY SPORTS WRITER
A big herd of wild horses are com-
ing to town, and if nobody stops them,
they'll probably make a big mess.
Well, not really horses. It's just
a lacrosse team with a horse for a
mascot.
The Broncos of Western Michigan
come to Ann Arbor Saturday night to
take on the Michigan men's lacrosse
club, and the Wolverines are looking to
keep their record at the home corral
perfect.
Michigan has won all three of its
home contests so far this season, and
has an overall record of 5-1.
The Broncos, meanwhile, bring to
town a reputation for tough, physical
play, much like their namesake.
Michigan coach RobertDiGiovanni
said Western traditionally plays arough
game, and expects the cross-state rival
to give the Wolverines a challenge.
"They're one of the better clubs in
the state of Michigan," he said.
After Michigan State's varsity
squad, DiGiovanni said Michigan and
Western attract the state's best lacrosse
WRESTLING
Continued from page 5
the 177-pound weight class by storm at
the Big Tens after being out of action
for nearly two months due to a knee
injury. He won four of his five matches
to take third place.
Biggert, the starter at 167 pounds,
took fourth place at the Big Tens. His
victories over Wisconsin's Chris Walter
and Penn State's Bryan Matusic earned
him a trip to North Carolina.

players.
"They're not as skilled as a city or
varsity club but they should certainly
give us a game," he said.
Ohio State's varsity squad handed
the Wolverines their only loss of the
campaign, while a Detroit club team
gave the Wolverines a close game last
week before finally folding.
Against other club teams, however,
the Wolverines have been able to use
all their offensive tools, winning by
margins ranging from eight to 22 goals
in four games against other university
club teams.
And all that despite injuries to key
goal scorers.
The injuries have forced
DiGiovanni tojugglemidfielders in an
effort to create three solid lines of mid-
dies.
Injuries and academic difficulties
have also reduced the numberof avail-
able attackmen to four.
However, with the Wolverines
feasting on other clubs as if they had
gone hungry all winter, it doesn't seem
as if injuries, or much else, can slow
them down.

By MICHAEL ROSENBERG
DAILY HOCKEY WRITER
The Western Michigan hockey.
team is still alive in the national title
hunt, but only in the sense that a
lobster is still alive in a fish tank at
a seafood restaurant. In other words,
it will be a major upset if the Bron-
cos live to see next week.
Western Michigan, which fin-
ished fourth in the conference, will
have to win three games this week-
end to take the postseason title, and
insure an invitation to the NCAA
tourney in St. Paul, Minn. The first
is against Miami (Ohio) tomorrow
night. The winner will face No. 2
Michigan Saturday in a league semi-
final.
Although their path is difficult,
the Broncos are a solid team which,
with some luck, could make the
NCAA tournament. Western Michi-
gan finished fourth in the confer-
ence during the regular season,
thanks to a strong late-season run.
"The last half of the season we
played well defensively, including
goaltending," Broncos coach Bill
Wilkinson said.
Goaltenders Craig Brown and
Brian Renfrew have shared
netminding duties for Western
Michigan, but Brown has started
more times in the past two months.
Brown has a sparkling 2.57 goals
against average, compared to 3.58
for Renfrew. Brown's stat is even
more impressive considering that
his GAA was as high as 3.80 in mid-
December.
The Broncos will need both goal-
ies to be in top form if they're going

to win the CCHA tournament.
"Goaltending is real critical (in a
three-game series)," Wilkinson said.
"(Spending) less time on special

teams is also
important be-
cause you
won't be able to
utilize your
best players
(otherwise)."
O f f e n -
sively, the
Broncos are led
by wingers
Colin Ward (28
goals-18 as-
sists-46 points)
and Craig
Brooks (16-28-
44).

The Road
to
The Joe
SCCHA
Championship
March 18-20

MARK FRIEDMAN/Daily

Western Michigan takes on Miami tomorrow night, with the winner set to
play Michigan Saturday in the semifinals of the CCHA tournament.

SWIMMING
Continued from page 5
"I don't necessarily think we have
anyone who is going to win an event,"
Humphrey said. "Our strength is more
going to come from people making
consolation finals and getting into
finals."
The Wolverines also need key con-
tributions from its divers in order to
fare well.
SeniorCinnamon Woods, the 1993

runner-up in the 10-meterplatformdive,
and sophomore Carrie Zarse, who was
the Phillips 66/U.S. Diving one-meter
indoor and outdoor national champion,
look to score high for the team.
"I don't think we're going to worry
about anything other than people just
stepping up there and racing the best
they can race," Richardson said. "I
don't worry about having to finish as
high as we did last year."
According to Richardson, the top
three teams - Stanford, Florida and
Texas - are the elite of the collegiate

Health Issues and Answers These questions were taken from the Computer Health Information Program on MTS.
UM-CHIP is an anonymous server available from UMnet. At the Which Host" prompt, type: UM-CHIP.
(Q.) Is the nicotine in Nicorette gum as harmful as the nicotine in a cigarette?
(A.) Research indicates a 30% increase in quit rates among ex-smokers who temporarily use nicotine gum along with a
behavior change oriented smoking cessation program. Researchers and clinicians consider the temporary use of nicotine
gum to be a much healthier choice than remaining a smoker. Nicotine gum can provide the nicotine the ex-smoker is
craving without the intake of carbon monoxide, tar and other irritants. However, nicotine gum can have side effects such
as lightheadedness, nausea, throat and mouth irritations, hiccups and stomach upset. It can be particularly harmful
ifnot used properly. Pregnant and nursing women andchildren should not use nicotine gum. Like any prescription drug,
nicotine gum should only be used as prescribed by your clinician.
Q.) Do you do HIV antibody blood testing at UHS? At what price?
A.) Yes. The University Health Service has an anonymous and confidentialHIV antibody counseling and testing program.
Testing is free for enrolled UM students and $35.00 for all others. You must attend an HIV/AIDS Education Session
before making an appointment for HIV counseling and testing. The 45 minute HIV/AIDS Education Sessions are held
during the week at UHS in the 3rd floor conference room (Rm. 309). A schedule of times for the sessions is posted in
the Nurse Clinic and included on the HIV testing information tape, accessed by calling 763-6969. Once you have
attended an education session, you can sign up for counseling and testing by stopping in the Nurse Clinic between 8am-
4:30pm on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays or 9am-4:30pm on Thursdays. Appointments can also be
scheduled by calling the Nurse Clinic at 763-4511. m sa H a &Anovere
is jointly produced by MSA and UIS.

swimming programs. The field in-
cludes seven other schools (Michi-
gan, SMU, USC, Auburn, Alabama,
Georgia and Northwestern) who will
battle for the rest of the top 10 spots.
"What this team has got to do is
pretty simple," Richardson said.
"They've got to do the best they can
and we'll see how we stack up against
the other teams this year."
Michigan has been working for this
weekend all year. The Wolverines be-
gan preparations after the conference
meet, shaving, tapering and increasing
their yardage to make sure they were
still in good shape.
Poor health has also threatened
Michigan's progress all year. but it
won't stop the Wolverines from mak-
ing a bid for the national title.
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BERENSON
Continued from page 1
at a worse time for the Wolver-
ines. The CCHA championship is
scheduled for this weekend in
Detroit and the NCAA tournament
begins next week. Michigan is
looking to win its first-ever
CCHA postseason title and its
first NCAA title since 1964.
"We don't look at it as a
distraction," senior David Oliver
said. "He is going through a tough
time now. We have to play harder
for him than we ever have be-
fore."
Berenson was unavailable for
comment, but Michigan assistant
coach Mel Pearson said, "It really

Ward has been one of the
CCHA's best performers in the past
month. He is on a six-game point
streak, and was named the*
conference's offensive player of the
week for his four goals and two
assists in Western Michigan's first-
round sweep of Notre Dame this
weekend.
Captain Brent Brekke is one of
the better defensemen in the confer-
ence. Brekke has a plus-22 rating
and 26 points on the season.
Wilkinson feels his team belongs
among the league's elite.
"The top six teams have really
worked hard," he said. "The best six
teams are here."
- The Daily will complete its
preview of the remaining teams in
the CCHA title hunt Friday.

does not have anything to do with
the team. Their focused and ready
to go after it."
The Berenson incident is the
latest in a line of occurrences that
have tarnished the reputation of
the Michigan athletic department.
The problems began with the
stealing of beer by two football,
and later by three basketball
players in January, and continued
with a football player firing shots
at plainclothed police officers in
February.
Berenson faces separate
charges of drunk driving and
urinating in public. Both carry the
same maximum punishment of 90
days in prison and a $100 fine. He
is scheduled to appear Tuesday in
15th District Court.

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