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March 11, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-11

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 11, 1994

SPEECH
Continued from page 1
However, other panelists focused
more on gender issues. Dean of LSA
Edie Goldenberg said many times it is
not the professors' intention to offend
students; often they are surprised when
they find out they have. She encour-
aged students to approach their instruc-
tors when problems arise.
However, Dennis Shields, assistant
dean and director of admissions in the
Law school, said, "Students may not be
willing to confront professors because
they don't want to jeopardize their
grades."
Although speakers disagreed on
some points, they all agreed that talk-
ing about the problems was an impor-
tant step in finding a solution. "The
next step is more of what we are doing
here tonight," Thorson said.
"We need to open up the dialogue
more and address it in each department
and in each college on campus," Shields
added.
- Daily staff reporterLou Quillen
contributed to this report.
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COUPLE
Continued from page 1
ever, when Daniels and Fogel pointed
this out, the cooperative still refused
their application, according to the suit.
David Thompson, the cooperative's
board president at the time, explained
in a letter to the couple that the
cooperative's definition of a family
had "been used since the Co-op was
created 20 years ago," and invited them
to apply separately instead.
At that point they began making
phone-calls, and discovered the Fair
Housing Center, which deals with com-
plaints of housing discrimination and
assists people in taking appropriate
steps. "In this instance, after investigat-
ing the claims, (the center and Daniels
and Fogel) decided to file a suit," Ex-
ecutive Director Pam Kisch said.
In the suit, Daniels and Fogel claim
discrimination based on gender and
marital status. "If one of them had been
a man, they would have been able to get
housing," explained Helen Gallagher,
the attorney representing the couple
and the center.
According to the suit, the
cooperative's policy violates the Ann
Arbor municipal code, prohibiting dis-
crimination on the basis of sex, marital
status and sexual orientation.

GIVING JULIA CHILD A RUN FOR HER MONEY

REBECCA MARGOLIS/Daily
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SHAKESPEARE
Continued from page 1
out Shakespeare's plays, Vere said.
A man who was not educated,
trained orpart of the nobility could not
have written such detailed accounts of
courtly and historical events, Vere said.
English Prof. Leo McNamara calls
such claims a fantasy. "The evidence
for the existence of Shakespeare and
that Shakespeare writing the plays is
stronger than any other historical fig-
ure," McNamara said.
However, Vere insists, it was im-
possible for the alleged Shakespeare,
who was not born into nobility, to have
risen so high in society.More plausible
is de Vere, who went from riches to
rags because of a lost inheritance.
He disagreed with other theories
that authors such as Francis Bacon or
Christopher Marlowe are the true Bard.
"Those men left us too much of
their own writing to compare to
Shakespeare's.... Bacon had a whole
different attitude of life. I don't find
any of those satisfactory," Vere said.
Vere blames his relative's
"wounded name" on a 16th-century
class system that considered writing to
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
ANN ARBORrCHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[one block south of CCRB]
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
10 a.m. - Morning Worship for Lent
6 p.m. - No service
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. - R.O.C.K. student gathering
Fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship -10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Soup & Supper dinner - 5:30
Study and discussion on human
sexuality 6 p.m.
Evening Vespers - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
730 Tappan 662-4245
[Across from School of Bus. Admin.]
LENTEN MEDITATION SERIES
"Instrument of thy Peace"
Every Wednesday, 12:15-12:45 p.m.
SUNDAY: Worship at 10:45 a.m.
An Open and Welcoming Congregation
Pastor Russell Fuller
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
T11 hmmcnnerr

be a sign ofa poor upbringing. Because
of this stigma, Edward de Vere used a
pseudonym of"Shakes-Speare."
Today, Vere said, many people do
not want to admit a part of the nobility
wrote the poems and plays.
"They almost concede that there's
no case for the man of Stratford. But
when it comes to the Earl of Oxford,
they see red," Vere said.
Another part of Vere's argument is
how the plays were dated. Vere places
them within the 1590s, when the man
from Stratford was only in his mid to
late 20s - much too young to have
written such mature plays as "Hamlet."
Michael Schoenfeldt, associate
chair of English, admitted it is difficult
to believe anyone is responsible for the
plays."They are incredible. It's hard to
imagine anyone wrote them.".
While the actual dating of his works
could be debated because of 16th cen-
tury copyright laws, Schoenfeldt said
he was "confident" Shakespeare was
the one and only author.
Despite any discouragement, Vere
said he will wait for the truth to be
acknowledged."Thisjust isn't going to
go away," Vere warned. "I might have
another 50 years or so. I will persist."
HOLOCAUST
Continued from page 1
performances involving student musi-
cians.
"I believe that this event will be
particularly interesting to students
because it is created by students for
students," Jelen said.
Jelen also highlighted the Holo-
caust Memorial Dedication.
"This is a unique and special event,
because it is going to establish the first
Holocaust memorial on a public uni-
versity site," Jelen said. "This is very
relevant for students, because it's their
university."
As in the past, one of the major
events scheduled is a 24-hour vigil on
theDiag. It will begin Wednesday at 11
a.m., with aperformanceby theacapella
group Kol Hakavode.
After, groups and individuals from

Regents saye
endowment
increases tied
to tuition
Students' tuition
money makes up for
drops in monetary
gifts to the
University
By JAMES R. CHO
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
DEARBORN - As one goes up,
does the other go down?
The record level of endowments to
the University go hand in hand with
student tuition, said oneregent afterthe
Board of Regents meeting in Dearborn
yesterday.
"Endowments are directly related
to tuition," said Regent Shirley McFee
(R-Battle Creek).
The University's endowment fund
surged to $911 million last year - an'*
increase of $227 million.
"Endowments are monetary gifts
to the University used for scholarships,
fellowships and professorships," said
Vice President and Chief Financial
OfficerFarris Womack.
Regental policy allocates 5.5 per-
centof the endowment to support pro-
grams specified by the donor. By the
end of 1993, the University had pro-
vided schools and colleges with $37.6
million-an increase of more than $7
million from theprevious year.
The University received a 17-per-
cent return on its investments.
Revenue earned from the invest-
ments is used to fund the University,
Womack said.
Operating funds for the schools and
colleges come in part from earnings on
the endowments, McFee added. 0
In addition to state appropriations,
research grants and revenue generated
by the University, McFee indicated
that tuition makes up for any shortfall.
"A mark-up in tuition results from
any shortfall in revenue. We have to
pay for the University," McFee said.
McFee added that increases in rev-
enuefrom'theendowmentfund in part
eases the burden in finding othersources 0
ofrevenue.
When asked whether the regents
will increase tuition again this year,
McFee said, "It's too early tell."
the community will have the opportu-
nity to read the names of individuals
who perished in the camps. The vigil's
main focus will be to bear testimony
and voice to the Holocaust victims.
Many University clubs and organi-
zations will be involved in this vigil,
including University administrators,
faculty and staff, political groups and
politicians, Hillel staff, Michigan Stu-
dent Assembly groups and fraternities
and sororities.
"We encourage anyone that wants
to get involved, to come to the Djag
and read names to help bear witness to
those that died in the Holocaust," saidO
LSAjuniorAllison Zeidel, co-chairof
the vigil committee.
"The Holocaust is collectively
everyone's responsibility. It is not a

Jewish tragedy, it's a human tragedy.
It is important that all sectors of the
University community realize this and
help take part and read names."

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students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
Winter term (January through April) is $95, year-long (September through April) is $160. Oncampus subscrip-
tions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
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EDt STAFF Jessie Halladay, Editor in Chief

NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Nate Hurley, Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, Carrie Bissey, Hope Calati, James R. Cho, Lashawnda Crowe. Lisa Dines. Sam T. Dudek, Ronnie Glassberg,
Michele Hatty, Katie Hutchins. Judith Kafka. Randy Lebowitz, Andrea MacAdam, James M. Nash. Zachary M. Raimi. Rachel Scharfman,
Megan Schimpf, Shari Sitron, Mpatanishi Tayari. Lara Taylor, Michelle Lee Thompson, Maggie Weyhing. April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Berndt (Editor), Kimberly Albert, Jennifer Angeles, Andrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL SaMn Goodstein, int Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker, Jason Lichtstein.
STAFF Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Jed Friedman, April Groff, Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Mo Park, Elisa Smith, Allison
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EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest. Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg. Jaeson Rosenfeld.
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Breitrose, Aaron Burns, Scott Burton, Ryan Cuskaden, Marc Diller, Darren
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ARTS Melissa Rose Bernardo, Nima Hodael, Editors
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