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March 04, 1994 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-04

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 4, 1994 - 11

'M' healthier for Big Tens

Wrestlers hope to salvage season

By BARRY SOLLENBERGER
DAILY SPORTS WRITER
Despite falling out of the Amateur
WrestlingNews Top 25 for the first time
this season, the Michigan wrestling team
(1-7 Big Ten, 6-9 overall)'experienced
something this past week that it has not
enjoyed often this season.
Good news.
Sophomore Jesse Rawls (177-
pound weight class), who has been
out of action since bruising his knee,
Jan. 18 against Michigan State, was
cleared to wrestle for the Wolverines
in the Big Ten Championships tomor-
row and Sunday in Iowa City.
At times this year, Michigan re-
sembled a MASH unit more than a
wrestling team.
Two other starters, freshman Bran-
don Howe (126) and junior Jehad
Hamdan (190) are out for the season
with knee injuries.
In addition to Rawls, senior All-
American Steve King (HWT) battled a
sprained ankle last month. Even

Michigan's most acclaimed wrestler,
senior All-American Sean Bormet
(158), recently fought a bout with en-
larged glands on the back of his neck.
Therefore, it should come as no
surprise that Michigan coach Dale
Bahr was excited by the news of.
Rawls' return to the lineup.
While in the lineup, Rawls was
12-8. His replacement, junior Kevin
Williams, was 7-10.
"(Rawls' return) is the nicest thing
I've heard in a while," Bahr said. "He
looks like he's in pretty good shape.
He's been working in the weight room.
"I think that because he is fresh
mentally and physically, he mightjust
do pretty well."
King will also wrestle this week-
end, despite dislocating his left ring
finger, Feb. 20 against Indiana.
"I'm sure it bothers him some-
times in practice when it gets bumped,
but (it) wasn't really a major prob-
lem," Bahr said.
In order to be competitive this

EVPE T a i
Michigan wrestler Lanre Olabisi tries to avoid getting pinned by Indiana's Brady Harrison.
Injuries not a problem for lacrosse;
team awaits Northwestern matchup

Ily WILL McCAHILL
DAILY SPORTS WRITER
When one of your starters and
*team captains goes down five min-
utes into the first game of the year, it
can't be a good omen.
But the Michigan men's lacrosse
club overcame that injury to senior,
midfielder Ivan Frank, and many other
bumps and bruises, on its way to two
victories in three games over spring
break.
Frank is expected to be out two
*onths or more.
The team played two games in the
South and one in Ohio during the
week off, along with a scrimmage
against a private lacrosse team.
After dropping the scrimmage, the
Wolverines roared back to spear
Florida State, 16-3, in Tallahassee
and sting Georgia Tech, 14-4, in At-
lanta.
The trip ended with a 22-2 loss in
Columbus to Ohio State's varsity
team.
The trip's injuries took their toll,
leaving the Wolverines undermanned
and overmatched.
"The trip went pretty much as we
expected," team co-captain John
Kolakowski said. "It was pretty tough,
especially with the injuries."
In addition to Frank, the other
notable injury over the break was to
starting midfielder Paul Dreyer, who
suffered a knee injury and may miss

two or three weeks.
"It was the most damaging spring
break trip in years," coach Robert
DiGiovanni said.
DiGiovanni was forced to use at-
tackers to fill his middle lines in the
Ohio State game.
Yet, he worries that the loss of
Frank and Dreyer may throw off the
rest of the team.
The team will be forced to mix up
the middle lines, making linemates
out of players who may not have been
on the field together before.
"(The loss of Frank and Dreyer) is
going to cause us problems,"
DiGiovanni said. "We're going to be
running patchwork out there."
On the plus side, Kolakowski
said he was pleased with the play of
the team's younger members, in-
cluding freshman goaltender Anil
Arora.
"He played well, especially for a
younger player," Kolakowski said.
Freshman attack Bill Argersinger
also represented the younger players
well. Junior Sten Carlson and senior
Steve Simich spearheaded the Wol-
verines' high-scoring attack.
According to Kolakowski, seniors
Gannon Dudlar and Ben Hohmuth
led the defense that performed up to
par, registering some big hits in the
process.
Big hits are not out of the ordinary
for Dudlar, who also plays linebacker

'(The loss of Frank and
Dreyer) is going to
cause us problems.
We're going to be
running patchwork out
there.'
- Robert DiGiovanni
Michigan lacrosse
coach
for the football team.
This weekend the team faces off
against Northwestern at Oosterbaan
Field House in what looks to be the
biggest test of Michigan's young sea-
son.
Northwestern gave the Wolver-
ines a run for their money in the Big
Ten last year, with Michigan beating
the Wildcats in the semifinals of the
conference tournament. Michigan
went on to win it all.
"They were definitely the second-
best team in the Big Ten last year
(despite losing in the semifinals),"
Kolakowski said.
DiGiovanni is unsure what to
expect from the Wildcats. He said
they are usually in the upper ech-
elon of the Big Ten's western divi-
sion, behind Wisconsin's varsity
program.

TRACK
Continued from page 10
that the atmosphere will be decidedly
less intense than at other recent meets.
"There's a little bit of a letdown
(after the Big Tens) except for those
guys going to nationals," Warhurst
said. "It's kind of a low-key effect."
Two people who won't be taking
a low-key approach to tomorrow's
events are freshman Neil Gardner and
senior Toby Van Pelt. Both will be
trying to put forth performances -
Gardner in the 55-meter hurdles and
Van Pelt in the pole vault - that will
get them a spot on the qualified roster
when it is released by the NCAA
Monday.
Michigan coach Jack Harvey said
that the two have their work cut out
for them.
"Right now, Toby is about 18th on
the list and they're taking 14, and
Gardner's 20th on the list and they're
taking 16," Harvey said.
Last week at theBig Tens, Gardner
finished second in the hurdles with a
time of 7.37 seconds, and Van Pelt
finished fifth in the pole vault with a
personal-best height of 17 feet 2.75
inches.
"If (Van Pelt) gets a big jump and
jumps like 17-9, it'd be a pretty good
chance he'll get in, and (Gardner) has
got to run like 7.29 (seconds), and
he's run 7.33," Harvey said. "They're
really an outside shot at this point."
Most of those who have already
qualified for nationals will be resting
tomorrow in preparation for the
NCAA meet.

They said even after already win-
ning the Big Ten that getting psyched-
up for nationals is not hard at all.
"Nationals is big," said sopho-
more Scott MacDonald, a qualifieras
a member of the distance medley re-
lay.
"Big Tens we really wanted to
win, so it was a big one, but ... I've
really been thinking Big Tens and
nationals all year, not one at a time."

in Iowa City
weekend, the Wolverines will need
strong performances from the wres-
tlers recovering from injuries.
Seven of the conference's teams
are ranked in the Top 25 - Minne-
sota (second),Iowa (third), Penn State
(fourth), Michigan State (11th), Indi-
ana (17th), Wisconsin (23rd) and Ohio
State (25th). Michigan, Illinois, North-
western and Purdue also received
votes.
Despite his team having dropped
nine of its last 12 meets, Bahr remains
cautiously optimistic about the
squad's chances this weekend and at
the NCAA Championships.
"I'm optimistic about the guys that
have a lot of experience and have
been there before," Bahr said.
Harper believes that the Wolverines
can challenge for a top spot in the confer-
ence, despite their poor overall record.
"We've been working really hard
and I think we're coming together at
the right time," he said. "We are prac-
ticing ... as well as we have all year."
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