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March 04, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-04

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 4, 1994

DO WE HAVE
EVERYONE? .vik* ' ''" "v
Fourth-graders return
to their buses after
attending "Madame
Butterfly" at the
Power Center
yesterday. -
Approximately 2,000
Washtenaw County
students attended
the one-hour
performance, '
produced by the New
York City Operar
Company. t:
CHRIS WOLF/Daily -
-- - -----------1 ----------

BOSNIA
Continued from page 1
unless the Bosnian factions work out
apeace settlement. That policy is "not
very courageous," he said.
The United States does have a
large contingent of warplanes in the
NATO force that patrols Bosnia's
skies.
Two U.S. F-16 fighter jets shot
down four Serb warplanes that U.N.
officials said bombed a Bosnian gov-
ernment arms factory Monday about
45 miles northwest of Sarajevo.
A NATO threat to use warplanes
to bomb Serb artillery around Sarajevo
ended the shelling of the besieged
capital by forcing the Serbs to remove
their tanks, howitzers and mortars.
In Washington, the commander of
U.S. forces in Europe said the Serbs
had almost completely complied with
the ultimatum, removing or surren-
dering nearly all of the 600 heavy

weapons surrounding Sarajevo.
"I'd say we're close"to full co
pliance, Gen. George Joulwan toll
theU.S. Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee yesterday.
The ultimatum on Sarajevo bol-
stered a U.N.-mediated truce that has
generally held for three weeks.
A U.N. spokesperson, Maj. Jose
Labandeira, said Serb troops opened
fire with small arms on government
troops at the Jewish Cemetery i
downtown Sarajevo early yesterda.
French peacekeepers in the area then
fired a warning volley of machine-
gun fire.
That followed an incident Wednes-
day in which Serbs shot four rocket-
propelled grenades at government
troops near the cemetery, prompting
a gun battle.
U.N. officials quoted Serbs as say-
ing they fired the grenades becau*
government soldiers were violating
the truce by reinforcing trenches.

I

Ninth
ISRAEL

Read Daily

CONFERENCE DAY

A Day-Long Academic Program Exploring Social, Cultural and Politcai Aspects of Israel

SI

ITS

Sunday, March 6, 1994

9:30 am - 5:30pm

Rackham School of Graduate Studies, The University of Michigan
Admission is free. For more information call Hillel: (313)769-0500

i

CHINESE CUISINE
ife
747-9968 . Fax: 747-9967
Sun: Noon-9pm " M-Th: 11:30am-9:30pm
Fri & Sat: 11:30am-10:30pm

Take-Out & Delivery

Catering
Mi Fung (rice noodle dishes)
Special Requests
Special Lunchtime
Combinations
Daily Specials

1753 Plymouth Rd.
Courtyard Shops

U I

RU-486
Continued from page 1
tion of the drug here.
The administration has given its
permission for Population Council to
negotiate with Roussel. Limited clini-
cal trials already havebeen conducted
at the National Institutes of Health and
the University of Southern California
Medical Center.
In addition to France and Britain,
Sweden and China also have legalized
thepill.
If the two parties reach a distribu-
tion agreement, the Population Coun-
cil will submit an application to the
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
for approval of the drug.
FDA officials would not speculate
on how long its review might take, but
those familiar with the process esti-
mate a delay of one to three years. The
length of the review process generally
depends on the medical priority of the
drug, the amount of medical documen-
tation available and information gath-
ered during the U.S. clinical trials.
A potentially life-saving, high pri-
ority medication - such as a new
AIDS drug - can win approval in as
little as 1I months, while reviews of
lower priority drugs can take several
years, said FDA spokesperson Larry
Bachorik.
Religious
Services
..:®®.A®O
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL .
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[one block south of CCRB]
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
10 a.m. - Morning Worship
"Do you get it?"
6p.m. - No service
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. - R.O.C.K. student gathering
Fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Soup & Supper dinner - 5:30
Study and discussion on human
sexuality 6 p.m.
Evening Vespers - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
730 Tappan 662-4245
[Across from School of Bus. Admin.]
LENTEN MEDITATION SERIES
"Instrument of thy Peace"
Every Wednesday, 12:15-12:45 p.m.
SUNDAY: Worship at 10:45 a.m.
An Open and Welcoming Congregation
Pastor Russell Fuller

ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies
Saturday: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions-4-5 p.m.

ISRAEL
Continued from page 1
resist being disarmed.
The national news agency Itim re-
ported that radical settlers in Hebron
and the nearby settlement of Kiryat
Arba have said they won't surrender
their weapons if attempts are made to
disarm them.
The mosque sniper, New York na-
tive Dr. Baruch Goldstein, came from
Kiryat Arba, and his grave there has
now become a shrine for Israeli ex-
tremists. Goldstein was beaten to death
by Palestinians after the massacre.
Five Kach members were arrested
yesterday trying to disrupt aJerusalem
demonstration protesting the massa-
cre.
Two Kach leaders have been de-
tained since Sunday. Three others are
fugitives.
For the Israelis, the crackdown was
a radical move on a highly emotive
issue.
The PLO has demanded Israel dis-
mantle some of the 144 Jewish settle-
ments that are a source of special fric-
tion. These include three in Hebron,
where 450 Israelis live among 80,000
Palestinians.

CRENSHAW RAPE PREVENTION
Continued from page 1 MONT H EY ENTS
than 100 - that they found to be par-
ticularly sexist in nature. During the ® March 11: Brown-bag
week ofMarch21,SAPAC will setup discussion on men in the
tables in various sites - such as the feminist movement.
UGLi, dormitories and even Borders U March 18: Bown-bag
Book Shop - so people can vote on discussion titled "Rape Hype:
which is the most sexist. Among the fact vs. Myth."
options area local Scorekeepers Sports
Bar & Grill ad showing a bikini-clad 0 March 21 and 28: Self
woman and an Old Spice ad that con- defense workshop for women.4
fuses the use of the word "no" in a
sexual situation. S March 22: Discussion
The"winners/losers"ofthecontest asking "!s Gangsta Rap the
will be announced April 9, at the Take Jusic of Sexual Violence?"
Back the Night rally that concludes
Rape Prevention Month. 9 March 29: Social Work Prof.

Rabin has dismissed that idea and
rejected a PLO demand for U.N. troops
to protect Palestinians.
Israel has ignored U.N. Security
Council resolutions to withdraw from
the territories, where 120,000 settles
live among 1.8 million Palestinians.
"People are sick and tired of us
talking peace. They want something on
the ground. Any negotiations that don't
have settlements high on the agenda
will be senseless," chief PLO negotia-
tor Saeb Erakat said yesterday.
VIGIL
Continued from page 1 0
with the events in a peaceful way."
Betsey Barlow, a faculty member
of the Center for Middle Eastern Stud-
ies, said she hopes the vigil will heighten
awareness for the difficulties of Pales-
tinians in occupied territories.
"The atmosphere for violence in
the Middle East is very chilling. The
candlelight march will bring studene
of all religions and all political views
together."
Abdelall added, "(The massacre) is
aterribledisaster, and asilentmarchis
the least we can do as students in
America."

Two e0$ential
in.gredient S
foelr a perfed t
A date and thbi--
~1961/5C

WEEKEND
Thursdays in the Daily

The Micigan Dily o(15 u-::- 967)is pubisned Ivonaay nrougn Fnay auring mte rallano winter terms oy
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
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CfIVOnlAl eVAee a :- sm-02--m- IF--muk - 1- 0%0-2-z

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EDITORIAL STAFF lpssie Halladav Fditnr in Ehipf

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cvE9 vnIrs4Q7Inrr 1CbIC F1411CIUClyl CUILUF III 6IIiCi

m

NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Nate Hurley. Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Robin Barry, Carrie Bissey, Janet Burkitt, Hope Calati, Jessica Chaffin James R. Cho Lashawnda Crowe, Lisa Dines. Demetrios
Efstratiou, Ronnie Glassberg, Soma Gupta, Michele Hatty, Katie Hutchins, Judith Kafka, Randy Lebowitz, Andrea MacAdanm, Shelley
Morrison, James M. Nash, Zachary Raimi, David Rheingold, Rachel Scharfman, Megan Schimpf, Shari Sitron, Mpatanishi Tayari, Lara
Taylor, Michelle Lee Thompson, Maggie Weyhing, April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Bemndt (Editor). Kimberly Albert. Jennifer Angeles, Andrew Taylor.

r

01

EDITORIAL Sam Goodstein, Flnt Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker. Jason Lichtstein.
STAFF: Cathy Boguslaski. Eugene Bowen, Jed Friedman, April Groff, Patrick Javid. Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Mo Park, Elisa Smith, Allison
Stevens, Beth Wierzbinski.
LETTERS EDITOR: Randy Hardin.
SPORTS Chad A. Satan, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest. Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenfeld.
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Breitrose, Aaron Burns, Scott Burton, Marc Diller, Darren Everson, Ravi
Gopa, Ryan Herrington, Brett Johnson. Josh Kaplan, Josh Karp, Brent McIntosh, Dan McKenzie, Antoine Pitts, Melinda Roco, J.L.
RostarnAbadi, Melanie Schuman, Dave Schwartz, Tom Seeley, Tim Smith, Elisa Sneed. Barry Solienberger. Doug Stevens, Jeremy
Strachan, Ken Sugiura. Ryan White.
ARTS Meissa Rose Bernardo, NiMa Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater), Tom Erewine (Music). Rona Kobell (Books), Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), John R. Rybock
(Weekend etc.), Michael Thompson (Film).
STAFF: Jordan Atlas, Nicole Baker, Matt Carlson, Jin Ho Chung, Thomas Crowley, Andy Dolan, Ben Ewy, Johanna Flies, Josh Herrngton,
Kristen Knudsen, Karen Lee, Gianluca Montalti. Heather Phares, Scott Plagenhoef, Marni Raitt, Austin Ratner. Dirk Schulze, Liz Shaw,
Sarah Stewart, Alexandra Twin, Ted Watts.
PHOTO Michelle Guy, Evan Petrie, Editors
STAFF. Anastasia Banicki, Mark Friedman, Mary Koukhab, Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie, Rebecca Margolis, Judith Perkins, Joe
Westrate, Sarah Whiting, Chris Wolf.

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DISPLAY SA~L E Jan a _Mm ew I1

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