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March 02, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-02

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 2, 1994

BOSNIA
Continued from page 2
spokesperson for the U.N. forces in
Bosnia. "I am only now seeing news
of it on CNN. But I think we can
celebrate about it if the airport really
can be opened."
Other U.N. officials in Sarajevo
expressed frustration that the Tuzla
arrangement had been negotiated bi-
laterally, without U.N. participation.
"This is another example of the
Russians jumping on the success
wagon," an aide to Lt. Gen. Michael
Rose, commander of U.N. forces in
Bosnia, told the Reuter news service.
Yesterday's agreement, an-
nounced at ajoint Moscow news con-
ference by Serb leader Karadzic and
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev, would end the Serb-en-
forced shutdown of the Tuzla airport

in the "near future," once Russian
peacekeeping troops are in place to
make sure the airfield is used only for
humanitarian flights. Serb military
commanders have opposed past U.N.
efforts to open the airport for humani-
tarian flights, saying that guns and
other military equipment would get
smuggled in.
A joint communique issued here
Tuesday stated that "the Russian side
expressed its willingness to send its
observers to Tuzia because of the
important humanitarian significance
of opening the airport."
It said Russian troops would be
used to ensure the "non-military use
of the airport."
Kozyrev termed the agreement a
"big step" toward bringing an end to
the Bosnian conflict. Karadzic, speak-
ing in Russian, expressed his "grati-
tude" for the Russian interventions.

NATO will keep high

THE LION DANCES IN WINTER

presence ov
THE WASHINGTON POST
NAPLES, Italy - NATO, baring
its fangs after the first combat action
in the alliance's 44-year history, in-
tends to maintain a stronger presence
in the skies over Bosnia in hopes that
the warring factions there will finally
be intimidated by the airpower above
them, senior military officers said
yesterday.
NATO aircraft have nearly
doubled the daily sorties flown over
Bosnia since the alliance demanded
last month that Serb gunners besieg-
ing Sarajevo either neutralize their
guns or face air attacks, according to

officials at the Allied Forces South-
ern Europe headquarters here.
The average number of flights by
NATO warplanes has increased from
30 or 40 sorties a day to 60 or 70, and
those higher numbers are likely to
remain in effect as part of what one
officer called an "adjust-up phase" of
the operation.
On Monday morning two U.S. Air
Force F-16s flying as part of that
heavier NATO presence shot down
four SerbJastreb ground-attack fight-
ers for violating a U.N. ban on mili-
tary flights over Bosnia.
Whether the skirmish succeeds in
cowing the Serbs remains to be seen,
officials here acknowledged, but they
noted that no Serb air activity was
reported yesterday and that Bosnian
Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, visit-
ing Moscow, agreed yesterday to U.N.
demands that the airport of the be-
sieged Muslim stronghold of Tuzla
be opened for relief shipments.
Otherwise, NATO officers main-
tained a studied nonchalance yester-
day regarding Monday's action, evi-
dently to avoid highlighting the esca-
lation of U.S. military action in the
Balkans and in deference to U.N. de-
sires that NATO avoid appearing ex-
cessively bellicose.

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JONATHAN LURIE/Daily
Mahlathini known in South Africa as "The Lion of Soweto" dances up a
frenzy at the Ark in Ann Arbor last night.

=MS A
Continued from page 1
Stern served one year as an LSA rep-
resentative from the Conservative
Coalition.
"The CC used to be really, really
strong," Stern said. "As time pro-
gressed, I saw the CC not being as
active."
The Students' Party candidate for
president, Business Rep. Devon
Bodoh said the endorsement was ex-
pected.
"I think it really shows us what the
Michigan Party's platform stands for
on this campus," Bodoh said.
The Outsider Party candidate for
president, LSAjunior Trevor Moeller,
agreed with Bodoh.

"It's not a surprise because thE
Michigan Party's the conservative
party incognito," Moeller said.
Despite the endorsement,
Robinson said the Conservative Coa-
lition does not agree with the Michi-
gan Party on every issue.
"We strongly oppose the compen-
sation of MSA executive officers,
whether the money comes from th
administration or MSA itself,"'sh
said.
The Michigan Party's proposed
constitution would allow MSA offic-
ers to be paid using the assembly's
funds.
Vice President for Student Affairs
Maureen A. Hartford earlier this year
proposed a $5,000 annual tuition
waiver for the executive officers of
MSA.

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GRAMMY
Continued from page 1
Grammy went to the soundtrack to
the movie, "The Bodyguard."
Just three weeks ago, she collected
eight trophies at the American Music
Awards for her single, "I Will Always
Love You," and the soundtrack to the
movie, "The Bodyguard."
"I think everyone can dig and un-
derstand 'I Will Always Love You',"
she said backstage. Dolly Parton, who
wrote the torch song two decades ago,
presented the Grammy to Houston.
The single has been one of the fastest-
selling tunes in music history, and the
movie soundtrack has sold more than
10 million copies.
The Disney soundtrack for
"Aladdin," Tony Bennett and coun-
try star Mary-Chapin Carpenter were
among the early winners of Grammy
Awards as the recording industry hon-
ored its top performers. The best new

artist Grammy went to Toni Braxton.
Sting, Billy Joel, Miss Houston
and Neil Young were among the com-
petitors for the prestigious record of
the year to be awarded during the
televised portion of the show.
Other early winners were
Aerosmith for best rock group, and
U2 for alternative music.
Bono of U2 was greeted with
cheers and gasps when he used a four-
letter word in delivering "a message
to the young people of America."
He returned a short while later to
present a lifetime achievement award
to Frank Sinatra and apparently didn't
stray from his prepared introduction.
After a standing ovation, a tearful
Sinatra said: "That's the best wel-
come I ever had."
He took a couple of deep breaths
trying to regain his composure, then
said: "This is like being in baseball,
the bases are loaded and you're at bat
-you don't know what you're going
to do."

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From the animators
of The Simpsons.
Featuring the voices of
Jason Alexander,
Tim Curry, Nancy Travis
and Dweezil Zappa.
With music
by Frank ZaDDa.

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