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March 01, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-03-01

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 1, 1994

Israel orders sweeping

WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO RECYCLING?'

*,curfew in
LOS ANGELES TIMES
JERUSALEM-Israeli military
authorities, trying to curtail Palestin-
ian protests over the massacre of
Muslim worshipers in Hebron last
week, yesterday ordered more than
1.25 million residents of the occu-
pied West Bank and Gaza Strip to
remain in their homes.
But the sweeping curfew, im-
posed on almost every Arab city,
town and refugee camp in the two
regions, failed to halt the unrest as
youths attacked army patrols, blocked
roads with burning tires and stoned
cars.
Two men - one 65 years old
walking to a Hebron mosque to pray,
the other a young lawyer going to
court in Nablus - were killed as
Israeli troops opened fire in clashes
with demonstrators.

I occupie(
Violent protests also continued in
Israel itself, as Israeli Arabs in
Nazareth and towns in the Galilee
region demonstrated for the third day
in solidarity with the Palestinians.
Police arrested 52 people in Nazareth
after rioters attacked Jewish motor-
ists and stoned government offices
and banks.
Thousands of Israeli Arabs at-
tended the funeral, conducted under
Palestinian flags and anti-Israeli slo-
gans, of a Bedouin killed by police
Sunday, the first Israeli Arab to die in
clashes with police since 1976. Police
were ordered out of the town in the
Negev Desert for the funeral, and no
violence was reported.
Israel's Parliament, the Knesset,
overwhelmingly approved a resolu-
tion strongly condemning the Hebron
massacre carried out by an Israeli

; areas
settler, a Brooklyn-born physician
from the extremist Kach movement,
who killed 48 Muslims as they knelt
at prayer before he was overpowered
and killed himself.
"As a Jew, as an Israeli, as a man
and as a human being, I am ashamed
for the disgrace imposed upon us by a
degenerate murderer," Prime Minis-
ter Yitzhak Rabin told the Knesset as
he set out the facts of the incident, the
government's crackdown on Kach and
other extremist groups and its efforts
to salvage the peace talks with the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
"This murderer came out of a small
and marginal political context," Rabin
continued. "He grew in a swamp
whose murderous sources ... are for-
eign to Judaism -they are not ours.
"To him and those like him, we
say: You are not part of the commu-
nity of Israel," Rabin said. "You are
not part of the national democratic
camp. ... You are not partners in the
Zionist enterprise.... Sensible Juda-
ism spits you out. You placed your-
self outside the wall of the Jewish
law. You are a shame on Zionism and
an embarrassment to Judaism."
With detention orders authorized
by the Cabinet, Israel's security po-
lice are searching for four leading
figures in Kach and its affiliates; one
settler has already been detained with-
out trial for three months. The army is
preparing to restrict the movements
and activities of 15 other settlers and
to disarm 20 more.

'U' center
facilitates
summner
job search'

international Center
benefits students
seeking summer
jobs overseas,
provides cultural
immersion

"

Are yOU Leaving:
An n Arbor S"0oon9*.
0#
* DO YOU NEED TO SUBLET YOUR #
" APARTMENT OR HOUSE'?
* !
# !
* , , 0
# 0
! 0
* 0
* !
C ADVERTISE IN THE MARCH e
_ CIASIIFIEDS SUMME R SUBL ET .
* SUPPLEMENT
e 0
eDeadline:* March lei at 4:OOPM *
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BE ADETSER E RCH
* 0i! ! !i ! !!
* CLASSIEIEDS SUMM eERe SUBLeETeeee

SARAH WHITING/Daily
A stack of homework await its student owners in the Chemistry building.

CAMPBELL
Continued from page 1
obtaining a rehearing was "very un-
usual" and that he was not judged
differently than in his first applica-
tion to the CEC.
The only way a case can be re-
evaluated is if new information is
discovered, or if any relevant infor-
mation was not evaluated regarding a
particular candidate.,Chamberlin said.
INCOME TAXES
STUDENTS 12 OFF!
FED & ANY STATE.
769-3031 REG $50

However, Chamberlin added,
"The chances (of receiving tenure on
a second hearing) are not zero, but
they're not high."
The CEC decided not to grant
Campbell tenure Feb. 17. "The deci-
sion from last year was reaffirmed,"
Chamberlin said.
Campbell said he believes the de-
cision was not based merely on his
qualifications. But he claims he can't
be sure, because,
"They make (the tenure evalua-
tionprocess)somystical.... It's some-
thing only tenured faculty can under-
stand."
Campbell was awarded the Fac-
ulty Recognition Award in October
1992 and has published two books
and several articles. He also has gained
the admiration of his students.
Campbell attributed his not re-
ceiving tenure to several reasons.
Because LSA Dean Edie
Goldenberg has different ideas about
the focus of the communication de-
partment, Campbell said those who
evaluated his case do not recognize
his work in criticizing television and

popular culture.
"I don't fit into the design they
have for the communication depart-
ment," he said.
Chamberlin denied any possibil-
ity of such a correlation. "I don't
believe that the current status or fu-
ture structure of the communication
department has anything to do with
this decision."
Campbell said he believes the ten-
ure track is "a very elite, hierarchi-
cally arranged system."
"If you don't have tenure, you've
got to suck up. You've got to behave.
... You have to be careful what you
say," he said.
Chamberlin defended the objec-
tivity and care that goes into tenure
evaluations. "We look in a detailed
way at each case and we make a
decision. ... We review them very
carefully," he said.
Chamberlin added that he would
not discuss the specifics of Campbell's
case with other faculty or students.
However, he said he was willing to
meet with Campbell again to discuss
the decision.

By MARIA KOVAC
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Does it seem like you've looked
far and wide for a summer job with-
out results? Perhaps you haven't
looked far enough. Many job op-
portunities await students in Eu-
rope and each year nearly 100 Uni-
versity students take advantage of.
those opportunities.
The University International
Center offers students the means to
obtain work experiences in coun-
tries such as England, Ireland,
France, Australia, New Zealand and
Costa Rica.
Bill Nolting, director of Interna-
tional Opportunities at the Interna-
tional Center, believes working
abroad is a great experience and
opportunity. "It allows cultural im-
mersion ... a workplace is a more
active situation than sitting in a
classroom," he said.
Molly Nicholson, a 1992 LSA
graduate, is now working in the Uni-
versity Orientation office.
Nicholson studied abroad in France,
which she said helps reinforce the
language. Working in the market-@
ing division of a London tour opera-
tor gave her confidence, she said.
"When you arrive, all you have
is a work permit. The BUNAC (Brit-
ish Universities North America
Club) orientation office tries to di-
rect you, but doesn't find you a
job," Nicholson said.
This kind of situation "makes
you fight your way to get a job you
want," she added.'
It is necessary to line up a job
before getting a work permit, which
presents an obstacle to working
abroad, Nolting explained.
But the national organization,
Council of International Educational
Exchange, overcomes this obstacle
by providing work permits to allow
students into a country, where they
can then look for a job.
"(Finding a job) wasn't easy ...
you have to be motivated," said Wil-
liam Tigertt, an LSA sophomore.
However, he found a position in
computer sales within three days of
being in London.
Three and a half days is average
for finding a job in Britain and 10
days is the longest, according to
Nolting.
In addition to the resources avail-
able at the International Center, an
information table will be in the
Union lobby today from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. and an informational meeting
will be held from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in
the center, located next to the Union.
Any University student interested
in working abroad is encouraged to
attend.

U

REAL I T Y B I TES

I0

MSA
Continued from page 1
nounced Business Rep. Devon Bodoh
as its candidate for president and
Michigan Collegiate Coalition (MCC)
Gov. Conan Smith as its candidate for
vice president.
Bodoh said the lack of experience
of the Outsider Party will make it
difficult for the party to accomplish
its goals.
"MSA is such a complicated orga-
nization that in order to have mean-
ingful change you have to have some
exposure and experience to the as-
sembly," Bodoh said. "You can't just
go changing things blind."
But Neenan said she sees the struc-
ture of MSA as part of the problem.
"I think the structure does impede
any real productivity, but that is the
reason the Michigan Party proposed
the new constitution," she said.
But Neenan probably should not
count on the support of the Outsider
Party for her party's proposed consti-
tution.
"Once again the Michigan Party
has offered the students more rheto-
ric," Moeller said. "As the underdogs
in this race, we have developed our
plan in the public eye and are offering
it to the students under no secret plan."
Moeller said the Outsider Party
plan would be put to a student vote in
November.
Two of the most controversial is-
sues in the assembly has been MSA's
continued support of MCC and the
Ann Arbor Tenants' Union (AATU).
MCC is a student lobbying coali-
tion in Lansing and AATU is a pro-
tenants organization located in the

groups, but not unconditionally.
"I support MCC," Rabinowitz
said. "I would not support it if they
continue to expect us to be the major
funders of that group."
For AATU, Rabinowitz said the
funding should be based on the num-
ber of students served.
Neenan said she supports
Rabinowitz's idea on AATU fund-
ing: But Bodoh criticized Rabinowitz
for his views on both groups.
"It's typical assembly jargon," he
said. "They want to put all kinds of
preconditions on their independent
operations."

LENNY KRAVITZ * THE JULIANA HATFIELD THREE." U2-
CROWDED HOUSE * WORLD PARTY * DINOSAUR JR.."
THE POSIES." SQUEEZE " THE KNACK * THE INDIANS."
LISA LOEB & NINE STORIES " ETHAN HAWKE."
ME PHI ME* BIG MOUNTAIN
THE ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE
SOUNDTRACK FROM A
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