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January 05, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-01-05

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 5, 1994

STOP COMPLAINING
about The Michigan Daily.
WRIT -E
for The Michigan Daily.
NEWS, SPORTS, ARTS, OPINION, PHOTO
MASS MEETING FOR NEW STAFFERS
January 12, 7:30 p.m., 420 Maynard
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Regents discuss admission trends
By JAMES CHO tomatic admission to a University . *
DAILY STAFF REPORTER an inaw-n cnp hri of4

Back in high school, if you were
assured admission to Michigan Law
School or graduate school upon
completion of a special undergradu-
ate program, would you have turned
down admission to Harvard, Yale and
othereliteschools? University regents
and administrators certainly hope so.
This was one of the ideas sug-
gested by University President James
Duderstadt at the University Board of
Regents December meeting.
The regents met with Director of
Undergraduate Admissions Ted Spen-
cer to discuss current trends in under-
graduate enrollment and strategies for
luring top high school scholars to the
University.
Duderstadt offered the idea of au-

grauua e sc ioma , one menu or
attracting top scholars to the Univer-
sity.
The University characterizes a top
scholar as a high school student with
at least a 3.8 grade point average and
a minimum 1300 score on the SAT.
Spencer outlined several methods
used to recruit students to the Univer-
sity. For example, this fall admis-
sions counselors visited 512 high
schools.
"We're visiting more high schools
in Michigan than ever before," Spen-
cer said.
He emphasized the importance of
campus visits by high school students.
"We have 24,000 campus visits
per year," he said. "If we can get
students to the campus, we usually

s

BOARD
Continued from page 1
recognition to LSA senior and re-
cently named Rhodes Scholar Leah
Niederstadt. Varner praised
Niederstadt' s accomplishments, add-
ing that she is the first female Univer-
sity student to earn the prestigious schol-
arship.

Niederstadt, who was captain of
the University's women's rugby team,
said she plans to continue her athletic
pursuits while she studies anthropol-
ogy at Oxford University in England.
Regent Philip Power (D-Ann Ar-
bor) then conended Marshall Scholar
Michael Weiss, an LSA senior and
triple major in math,tEnglishand phys-
ics, who was unable to attend the meet-
ing.

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JANUARY 5

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have a good chance of getting them to
the University."
Spencer stressed that the cost of
attending the University was an im-
portant factor affecting a students
decision to enroll.
Spencer said, "For out-of-state stu-
KLAN
Continued from page 1.
plicit message to the KKK- the orga-
nization was unwanted.
When the Klan received the bill
from the state of Ohio it decided not to
pay the bill, Robb said.
"The state of Ohio does not own
the First Amendment and they cannot
charge me for the right to speak at a
public event on public property," he
said.
Furthermore, the Klan announced
plans to hold another rally on a volatile
day, Jan. 15, which is the Saturday
before Martin Luther King Day.
"The rally is in protest to the na-
tional holiday," Robb said. "We feel
personally that the holiday for King
would be inappropriate. ... I think
there's a lot about Martin Luther King
that is being kept secret. That is evident
by the fact that his files (from federal
government investigations) are sealed."
The Klan was denied permission to
rally on the holiday, but it is currently
challenging the decision. Graham, the
samejudge who permitted the October
rally, is hearing the case.
In response to the announcement of
the rally on the holiday, which is held
sacred by much of the Black commu-
nity, the Columbus chapter of the
NAACP decided to fight back peace-
fully, chapter President Ruth Fraling-
McNeil said.
The NAACP has hired a private
investigator, Cornell McCleary, to seek
out the names, addresses and types of
cars of various Klan leaders through-
out Ohio to release to the public in
orderto diminish theiranonymity. The
NAACP also plans to hold a peaceful
rally infrontof Ohio KKK GrandTitan
Vince Pinette's Cleveland home
whether or not the Klan rally on MLK
Day occurs.
The Columbus NAACP is plan-
ning protests in the neighborhoods of
other Klan leaders Jan. 15, and it has
enlisted the Cincinnati, Dayton, and
Cleveland chapters to help.
McCleary, who serves as vicepresi-
dent of the Columbus Coalition of
Concerned Black Citizens and is a
member of the Ohio Freedom Fighters
Coalition, said, "The objective is to
minimize the Klan's ability to recruit,
and ... people know that a) we can
identify who they are and b) that we
are very comfortable coming to their
houses.
"They cause disruptions in other
communities, so, therefore, it's time to
make those communities where they

JONATHAN BERNDT/Daily
dents, its difficult. There's not a lot of
money available."
Regent Philip Power (D-Ann Ar-
bor) said, "The competitive attrac-
tiveness to out-of-state students has
deteriorated because of increased tu-
ition. It is no longer a bargain."
live start dealing with them and basi-
cally use peer pressure."
McCleary downplayed the possi-
bility of violence at the homes of the
Klan members because, "It's whole
different ball game.... The anti-pro-
testers are controlling it, so that mini-
mizes the chance of violence."
McCleary said the Ohio Freedom
Fighters Coalition did not advocate
such action at the October Klan rally
because "The Klan had not targeted
any group specifically. It was a free
speech thing.
"But when the Klan specifically
targeted Martin Luther King's birth-
day, meaning the Klan specifically
targeted the Black community ...
we had to have a different response
this time."
Fraling-McNeil said the NAACP
and other anti-Klan groups will be
meeting tomorrow to discuss whether
to advocate protests against the Klan at
the Statehouse Jan. 15.
Fraling-McNeil suggested the pos-
sibility ofa "human body wall, as a sign
of the solidarity, strength, and focus of
purpose" of the protesters. She de-
nounced acts of violence and heckling
at the October rally because "it gives
more power to the Klan than what they
need."
Fraling-McNeil said she received
two Christmas cards from the Klan in
response to her actions.
Robb said he did not know whether
Pinette sent the card, bu't said it was
appropriate.
"Sending the card, saying 'Merry
Christmas,' was nowhere near the
threat, the intimidating and the anger
and the hatred that was made by Mrs.
McNeil to Mr. Pinette ... that they're
going to give his address out in the
Black community where the gangs are
at," he said.
Fraling-McNeil said she believes
the card was sent because "I've obvi-
ously touched a nerve with the Klan
and they see me as their enemy and
they've targeted me for their terrorist
actions. Their whole mission is to ter-
rorize people, to keep them subject...
to silence me through scare tactics.
"They just unfortunately met with
the wrong match. ... The cards just
incensed in me a greater urgency and
commitment ... to challenge them
back."
Pinette could not be reached for
comment yesterday.
McCleary explained the actions of
Fraling-McNeil and the OhioFreedom
Fighters Coalition in one slogan for
dealing with the Klan: "One purpose,
one mind: Run the Klan out of Ohio."

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The Micrhigan Daily r(~ISSN 045967) jis publisned Monoay through Fridayduning thee fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term."starting in September. via U.S. mail are $90.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
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EDITORAL STAFF Josh Dubow,
NEWS Melissa Peerless, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Hope Calati, Lauren Derner, Karen Sabgir, Purvi Shah
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Berndt, Carrie Bissey, Janet Burkitt, James Cho, Lashawnda Crowe, Jen DiMascio, Dernetrios Efstratiou,
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David Shepardson, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor. Lara Taylor, Maggie Weyhing, April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITORS: Jonathan Berndt, Andrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL PAGE Andrew Levy, Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Sam Goodstein, Flint Wainess
STAFF: Julie Becker, Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Patrick Javid, Russel Koonin, Jim Lasser, Jason Lichtstein, Amitava Mazumdar.
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SPORTS Ryan Herrlngton, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Brett Forrest, Adam Miller, Chad A. Safran, Ken Sugiura
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Breitrose, Aaron Bums, Scott Burton, Andy De Korte. Marc
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ARTS Melissa Rose Bernardo, Nima Hodaei, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater), Tom Erlewine (Music), Rona Kobell (Books) Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), John R. Rybock (Weekend
etc.). Michael Thompson (Film), Kirk Weters (Fine Arts).
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PHOTO Michele Guy, Evan Petrie, Editors
STAFF: Anastasia Banicki, Anthony M. Croll. Mark Friedman, Susan Isaak, Mary Koukhab, Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie, Rebecca
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