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February 10, 1994 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-02-10

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8- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 10, 1994

LAPSES
Continued from page 5
only to leave Spartan guard Chris Pow-
ers open for an easy three.
Then nobody calls out a pick and
the Spartans get a wide-open bucket.
Worst of all, the Wolverines gave
up four consecutiveuncontested layups
on the fast break. Here's eight points,
you're very welcome.
"We didn't execute well. We didn't
run our offense. We didn't defend the
way we were supposed to defend,"
Roberts said. "As a result, they beat
us.
But you're playing the five fresh-
men, right, Coach? They're inexperi-
enced, right?
"They're nolongerfreshmen. We're
beyond that. We don't even use that as
an excuse."
Frankly, there is no excuse - ex-
cuses just don't cut it anymore. Right,
Coach?
Exercise Room .Study Lounge . 'TVLounge
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24 hiourAttendedLobby *G ame Room
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536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
761-2680

Men's volleyball splits up for busy weekend
I Spikers ready to face unknowns

01

By LAUREN ROSENFIELD
FOR THE DAILY
The Michigan men's volleyball
team has really got its hands full this
weekend.
With two events out-of-state and
one match at home, the Wolverines
must divide their time and their play-
ers. Half the team is traveling to Cin-
cinnati for tomorrow's match against
the Bearcats.
The following day, the same group
will move on to Kentucky for a day-
long tournament in Lexington. This
event will match Michigan against
Kentucky, Tennessee and several
smaller schools.
The rest of the players will remain
in Ann Arbor to take on an unan-
nounced team, possibly Macomb
County Community College or Notre
Dame.
However, Michigan coach Pam
Griffin is not worried about the divi-
sion of her squa.
"Practice has been going well, and
the outlook for this weekend is very
good," Griffin said.
Outside hitter, Chad Engel con-
curs with his cach in regard to recent
workouts.
"We've been doing a lot of scrim-
maging, which should be helpful,"
Engel d.
The fact that the team is being split
up does make each event all the more
unpredictable. The nature of the divi-
sion, in particular, is a minor concern.

The starting middle hitters will be
playing in Cincinnati and Kentucky,
but the outside hitters and setters will
stay home.
"This weekend's events will be
interesting," Engel said. "But it's re-
ally hard to predict what the outcome
will be."
Michigan's Mike Rubin stressed
the benefit of Saturday's event.
"The big thing we're looking to do
is to give the younger players experi-
ence in the tournament," the outside
hitter said. "That way they will be
able to step into the roles of the gradu-
ating players, to help the team next
year."

01

Griffin also emphasized the im-
portance of allowing more of the men
to play.
"We're trying to send those play-
ers that haven't been on the road yet to
Kentucky," said the second-year
coach.
Even though the team will be di-
vided this weekend, they are still at-
tempting to be a solidified group.
"I'd like to keep seeing the same
type of continued growth and becom-
ing more and more of a team," Rubin
said.
Griffin is slightly more cynical
about the upcoming weekend. With
vacation only a week away, she wants
to ensure the well-being of her team:
"Basically we are just trying 'to
make it to spring break without any
injuries," Griffin said.

.JOE ,,T R
Half of the men's volleyball team will head to Cincinnati and Lexington, Ky., this weekend while tie others will
remain in Ann Arbor for a match against either Macomb County Community College or Notre Dame. .

Doing the Wing Thing
AGAIN AT
S ~ I
*SiTAYUAa MS!Oil SAl

Blue attempts to bring home divisional skiing title

i ii!

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Call 665-7777 for deliveries:

By REBECCA MOATZ
FOR THE DAILY
Entering this weekend's two-day
divisional championship ski meet, the
Michigan men's and women's ski teams
are keeping their eyes focused on the
titles.
The Wolverines will compete
against members of their division in
the two-day race Saturday at Crystal
Mountain in Thompsonville and Sun-
day at Caberfae in Cadillac. The first
part of the meet will feature slalom
while Sunday's portion giant slalom.
The women's team heads into the
meet having won three of its four com-
petitions this season, with its only loss
at the hands of Michigan State in the
first matchup of the season. Though the
team does not practice because of travel
restrictions and classwork, they have
still logged plenty of ski time this wit-

ter.
"We're ready to compete because
we've been competing every weekend
since January. We know what we are
up against," Nicole Sinclair said.
Both teams' toughest competition
should come from the Spartans and
Notre Dame, who each have a couple
of strong members. Yet the women's
Wolverine team, of Sinclair, Amy
Portenga, Kelly Copeland, Carrie
Roeser and Jennifer Shorter, is ready to
face the challenge.
"We all ski close, and tend to ski
one, two, three, so we can win the
medals...we are very consistent,"
Shorter said.
Jim Schaefer and Bing Brown top
the men's roster and look to do well
individually in order to help the team
which has gone undefeated this season.
"Though skiing is a team sport, you
have to prepare individually. You have
to think as a team to do well individu-

ally," said Schaefer.
.With consistent skiing, no mistakes
and the soft, dry snow that fell earlier in
the week the men's squad feels that
they will have no problem winning the
division title. Placing well in the na-
tional competition is also a possibility.
"We are the best men's ski team
(ever)at Michigan," said Schaefer, who
went on to predict that the team would
place, "in the top five if not the top two"
at the National Collegiate Champion-
ships. '
If one of the team members should
fall during their run, the team can still
garner a division championship. To

secure the title the Wolverines must
place in the top five.
Each team is compiled of five ski-
ers, and the scoring is based on a two-
run combination. After adding up the
scores, the team with the least number
of points wins the meet.
With a win this weekend, the Wol-
verines would move on to the regional
championship in LaCrosse, Wis. next
Thursday.
Two weeks later, the team would
then travel to the National Collegiate
Championships which are under the
auspices of the National Collegiate Ski
Association.

'Though skiing is a team sport, you have to
prepare indvidually. You have to think as a team
to do well individually
- Jim Schaefer
Michigan skier

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