100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 04, 1994 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 4, 1994

MALAMUTH
Continued from page 1
of the University," Goldenberg said.
Malamuth said he believes schol-
arly activities should be a main focus
of the department.
"The scholarly vision in the gradu-
ate and undergraduate programs is
where the department's emphasis
needs to be placed," he said.
Rana Sadek, an LSA sophomore
and communication concentrator,
agreed that the focus of the depart-
ment needs to shift toward academ-
ics.
"The department has a reputation
as being a department that jocks take
classes in and people who are not
serious in getting a good education
and as an easy way out," Sadek said.
She added, "The wide variety of
courses offered by the department is a
good reason to major in it."
The dean is expected to announce

the members of the committee next
month. Thesteering committee will
likely consist of five or six faculty
members from outside the department
and two or three from within.
The committee will determine the
mission of the department, including
its role within the University, and is
expected to report its recommenda-
tions to the dean at the end of the year.
Malamuth was recruited to the Uni-
versity two and a half years ago con-
ducted by a search committee com-
prised of faculty who were members of
various LSA departments.
"They wanted a new chair as part of
the ongoing developments of giving a
coherent focus to the department,"
Malamuth said.
He cited a number of perks that
attracted him to the University, includ-
ing the promise of a new laboratory for
the department.
"I'm sure the rooms in the building
and the resources will continue to be
useful to other people," Malamuth said.

A NOVEL SPEAKER

VIETNAM
Continued from page 1
guided by progress in four key areas:
ERecovery of remains of Ameri-
can soldiers in Vietnam. Clinton said
that since last July, remains of 39
American servicemen had been re-
covered,
EResolution of "discrepancy
cases" in which there was reason to
believe people could have survived.
Clinton said that since July, the num-
ber of such cases had been reduced
from 135 to 73.
EFurther assistance from Vietnam
and Laos in conducting searches along
their common border. The first such
investigation took place in December
and located new remains and crash
sites, Clinton said.
ERelease of any documents from
Vietnam that could shed light on the
fate of those still missing. Clinton

What are you doing Saturday?
Nothing?
Then Spend...
"R Day In The Life Of A Leader"
12:00 noon this Saturday
Hale Auditorium, in the B-school
For information or to register call 663-4505

REBECCAMMRGOLIS/Daity
Author Faye Moskowitz gives a reading at Hillel last night. Moskowitz is a
noted short story writer and former National Public Radio commentator. In
her work she deals with issues of Jewish identity and family relations.
*Pn-r" Brand Self-DefenseB as.
f, eSpray
Police proven safe and easy to use.
[$12.95 2 FOR $24.95 No orders to E
I SYS IN I DESS&HCV MA, NY ho, DC
18YRS+, INCLIUD)ESS&H t r ee o rm n ..
Taylor & Parker 852 Elmwood Rd/tSuite 118
Lansing, Mi 48907
- a * *

TRIPS
Continued from page 1
"It's thrilling to learn the techni-
cal aspects of things you always
wanted to do but never had the oppor-
tunity," Vaughn said.
In addition to the excursions, the
ODR offers special opportunities for
student groups and organizations, such
as classes or fraternities and sorori-
ties.
The Challenge Program utilizes a
series of cables, ropes, platforms and
props to create an obstacle course that
promotes group cooperation, commu-
nication and creative problem solv-
ing. The program operates from late
March through early December.
All programs are taught by skilled,
veteran facilitators trained in the
course, in addition to medical proce-
dures. Safety is stressed in all aspects
of the programs.
The ODR's Resource Center sup-
plies current files for students inter-
ested in planning their own trips. The
files contain information arranged by
SALSA
Continued from page 1
pants.
"I hope that (students) will look
up to Cdsar Chivez as a role model, a
figure such as Malcolm X and Martin
Luther King (because) they pursued
the struggle for human equality," he
said.
Another SALSA officer Lisa
Quiroga said, "There's nothing in the
media about Cdsar Chaivez (to com-
memorate him), so that's why we're
doing this."
In helping to carry on Chivez's

said that since July, important docu-
ments had been released from the
Vietnamese archives.
There is a strong suspicion among
many MIA family members and vet-
erans groups that some of the missing
are still alive, but the administration
has said there is no credible evidence
of that.
Last summer, Clinton promised to
keep the embargo until Vietnam pro-
vided a full accounting of the missing
Americans.
His decision to soften that stance
was made easier by a non-binding,
62-38 vote in the Senate last Thurs-
day favoring an end to the embargo.
Some veterans and family groups
maintain that Vietnam has recovered
the remains of hundreds of MIA's but
refuses to turn them over to U.S. au-
thorities.
Administration officials said Viet.
nam may have stored remains at one
point but no longer does so.
sport or geographical location, in-
cluding maps, how-to guides and
travel tips. There is also a book and
magazine section.
But the ODR does not leave stu-
dents empty handed on personal trips.
Tucked -away in the corner of the
NCRB's main gym is the ODR rental
center. Open to students, faculty and
staff, it is stocked with an array of
camping gear, sports equipment and
accessories, including tents, fold-up
toboggans, tug-of-war ropes and vol-
leyball nets.
Cross-country skis are the newest
addition to the center's inventory.
Accessories include foam pads, shov-
els, water bottles, life vests and back-
packs. Rates are set by the day, week-
end or week.
One student rented a backpack to
take to Europe, said ODR Director
Adrien Garrison.
But some of the equipment has
also been used closer to home.
Sleeping bags "have been used to
sleep outside of Crisler Area in order
to get basketball tickets," Garrison
said.
work, SALSA is rallying support for
the boycott on grapes began in 1966
by Chavez and the United Farm Work-
ers Organizing Committee to stop
violations of workers' rights. One such
violation, which workers say contin-
ues today, is the use of pesticides on
the crops while the workers are in the
fields, which endangers their health.
The events for Chicano History
Week are sponsored by the Office of
Academic Multicultural Initiatives,
the Office of the Vice-President for
Student Affairs, Latino/Latina Stud-
ies Program, the Michigan Student
Assembly and the Rackham Office of
Minority Affairs.
from the Masters' project," said John
Saluri, a teaching assistant for a class
that did an audit.
"Our teaching goal is to get stu-
dents out of the mentality that college
is a stage before real life," Saluri said.
"At the University, we're having
an impact on our environment by just
being here," he said.
The Project Outreach class was
taught fast fall, but was not continued
this semester.
"There weren't enough students
enrolled, so it kind of didn't happen,"
Saluri said.
He said the class should be back in

the fall.
"We were hoping this would be-
come an ongoing thing," Saluri said.
"There's only so much you can
get done in a semester."

89.1 FM WELCOMES
Tuesday
February 15
8pm
Hill Auditorium
763-TKTS.764-2538

featuring
Marcus Roberts
Jon Faddis
Joshua Redman
Nicholas Payton

music of
Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington,
Count Basie, Jelly Roll Morton,
John Coltrane, Thelonius Monk,
Wynton Marsalis & others

Michigan Union Ticket Office & UMS Burton Tower Box Office
presented by UM Major Events & University Musical Society
University of Michigan Major Events and the University
Musical Society are taking the occasion of this concert to
honor the life of Morris J. Lawrence, Jr.

O per
person
DAYTONA
BEACH
BOARDWALK
1-800-535-2036
*Basedon 4 people
'Menion this ad and get
breakfast free
*Valid until March 3
Religious
Services
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron (near State)
Wenesd 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Dinner, discussion, study
663-9376 for more info
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:5 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[one block south of CCRB
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
Morning worship with holy communion
Evening Hymn sing:
Epiphany in words and song
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. - R.O.C.K. student gathering
Fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students
CHRISTIAN LIFE CHURCH
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
UNDA Y: Service 11 a.m.
HURON VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
Gay-Lesbian Ministry 741-1174
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Soup & Supper dinner - 5:30
Study and discussion on human
sexuality 6 p.m.
Evening vespers - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies
Saturday: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
,5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions-4-5 p.m.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, near Hill
SAfl2EDUAY: Worship-6:30 p.m.

. .

AUDIT
Continued from page 2.
The Green Team is composed of
faculty, staff and students from the
Business School who are acting on
information from the SNRE students'
audit.
"We're more of a steering com-
mittee or catalyst than actually an
authority to say, 'Do this,"' Hanley
said.
Hanley said since the Green
Team's recommendations have been
implemented, paper output has been
cut by 60 percent.
The work done by the SNRE stu-
dents also served as a springboard for
a Project Outreach class.
"I came un with the idea directly

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745.967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
Winter term (January through April) is $95, year-long (September through April) is $160. On-campus subscrip-
tions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 76-DAILY; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336; Opinion 764-0552
Circuan 76.058. lasife eruising 647 : sol advertiiong 764-054: Billng 764.0550

NEWS David Shepardison, Managing Editor
EDITORS- Nate Hurley, Mona Qureshi, Karen Saftr. Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Adam Anger, Robin Barry, Carrie Bissey, Janet Surkitt. Hope Calati, Jessica Chaffin, James Cho, Lashawnda Crowe. Lisa Dines,
Demetrios Efstratiou. Michelle Fricke. Ronnie Glassberg, Soma Gupta, Michele Hatty, Katie Hutchins, Judith Kafka, Randy Lebowitz,
Andrea MacAdam. Shelley Morrison, James Nash, Zachary Raimi. David Rheingold, Rachel Scharfman, Megan Schimpf, Lara Taylor,
Maggie Weyhing, April Wood. Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS: Jonathan Berndt (Editor). Kimberly Albert, Jennifer Angeles, Andrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL San Goodstein, Flint Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker, Jason Lichtsteln.
STAFF: Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Mo Park, Elisa Smith, Allison Stevens.
LETTERS EDITOR: Randy Hardin.
SPORTS Chad A. Safran, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest. Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenfeld.
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Paul Barger, Tom Sausano, Charlie Breitrose, Aaron Burns, Scott Burton. Marc Diller, Darren Everson, Ravi
Gopal. Ryan Herrington, Brett Johnson, Josh Karp, Brent McIntosh, Dan McKenzie, Antoine Pitts, Melinda Roco. J.L Rostam-Abadi,
Melanie Schuman, Dave Schwartz, Tom Seeley. Tim Smith, Elisa Sneed, Barry Sollenberger, Doug Stevens, Jeremy Strachan, Ken
Sugiura. Ryan White.
ARTS Melissa Ross Bernarido, ba Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater), Tom Erlewine (Music). Rona Kobell (Books), Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), John R. Rybock
(Weekend etc.), Michael Thompson (Film). Kirk Wetters (Fine Arts).
STAFF: Jordan Atlas, Mat Carlson" Jin Ho Chung, Thomas Crowley. Andy Dlean, Geoff Earle, Josh Herringon, Kristen Knudsen, Karen
Lee, Gianluca Montafti, Heather Phares, Scott Plagenhoef, Austin Ratner. irk Schulze, Sarah Stewart, Alexandra Twin. Ted Watts.
PHOTO MicebeW Guy, van Petrie, Editors
STAFF: Anastasia Banicki. Mark Friedman, Mary Koukhab, Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie, Rebecca Margolis, Judith Perkins, Joe
Westrate, Sarah Whiting, Chris Wolf.

Snhe openin

I'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan