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January 31, 1994 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-01-31

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 31, 1994

U.S. grants entry to IRA
leader for peace meeting

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
United States granted a limited visa
yesterday to Gerry Adams, president
of Sinn Fein, the political wing of the
Irish Republican Army.
The decision, announced by the
White House, reverses a policy of
barring Adams from the country be-
cause of his association with the IRA.
The White House said Attorney
General Janet Reno had issued a
"waiver to his ineligibility" to allow
Adams to attend a peace conference
in New York. This was at the recom-
mendation of Secretary of State War-
ren Christopher.
Adams has been turned down in
eight previous requests for visas, and
the decision to allow him into the
country reflects recent progress in
negotiations to end decades of civil
strife in Northern Ireland.
"The president supports this deci-

sion and believes it will help advance
the cause of peace in Northern Ire-
land," said a White House statement.
Adams, who is to address a meet-
ing in New York on Tuesday, will be
allowed to stay in the United States
only 48 hours, and must stay within
25 miles of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel
where the conference is being held.
He also is prohibited from engag-
ing in any direct or indirect fund-
raising.
Officials of the State Department,
the National Security Council and the
Justice Department met Saturday and
Sunday to discuss Adams' case, ac-
cording to a source close to the dis-
cussions.
In its initial response to Adams'
visa request, the administration said
Adams must first renounce violence.
Sinn Fein is the legal political ally of
the outlawed paramilitary group.

Col. North
says Reagan
made him lie
WASHINGTON (AP) - Senate
hopeful Oliver North blamed Presi-
dent Reagan yesterday for the lies he*
told in the Iran-Contra scandal.
North acknowledged during an
appearance on CBS News' "Face the
Nation" that he had lied to members
of a House Intelligence committee.
North denied to lawmakers that he
was assisting the rebels. In fact, he
was running an operation to keep the
Contras supplied with weapons. s
"I was asked questions that I had
been told from the president of the*
United States could never be revealed,
OK?" North said in explaining..
"Who made you do it?" North
was asked by host Bob Schieffer.
"Well, the president of the United
States," North replied. He noted that
Reagan had requested money for the
Contras from Saudi Arabian leaders.

DER
_

HE

:7

LSA junior Tom Rohdy sits in his car,

waiting to order from the Taco Bell on South State Street.

JOE WESTRATE/Daily

~Egrcise Room # Studyj Lounge #PTVLoune
Computer Rom Laun Fac i nies
24 hour Attend dLobby * qame Room
H/eat and 'ater Included

1

CHECK OUTOU
L ILO IILw
MA~mA RATE

I

POLITICS
Continued from page 1
Republican Dick Chrysler, of
Brighton, already planned to chal-
lenge Carr again in the 8th District.
That district covers Ingham and
Livingston counties and parts of
Genesee, Shiawassee, Oakland, and
Washtenaw counties.
Chrysler, a self-made millionaire,
outspent Carr $1.8 million to $1.4
million in 1992andcame within 3,611
votes of beating him (135,517-
131,906).
"This is a totally different race, I

would maintain," Byrum said. "I have
no grandiose dreams that I'm going to
outspend Dick Chrysler. I'll bejudged
in terms of what I've done."
Of course, that's only if Carr en-
ters the Democratic Senate primary.
The field for that already includes
Macomb County Prosecutor Carl
Marlinga, former U.S. Rep. Bill
Brodhead, and state Sen. Lana Pol-
lack, of Ann Arbor.
Pollack admitted last week that
she was relieved to hear Blanchard
wouldn't be getting into the race. "It
could open up the race for more
people," she said. "This is a level

playing field by and large. No one
will dominate the primary over the
next few weeks."
Byrum, who still works at her
family's hardware store on weekends,
spoke for all incumbents weighing
the odds of giving up their current
seat to take a crack at a higher office.
"There's just such a tremendous
opportunity to do some things on a
national level that would never be
available at the state Senate," she
said.
"It's a gutsy call. I'm either going
to go to the U.S. House or back to the
hardware store."

University Towers Apartment
536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
761-2680

Is MTS getting slower? "

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No substitutions. Up to two student meals may be ordered per one valid student I.D.
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UL S

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT FOR
COLD SORE TREATMENT STUDY

The University Health Service seeks volunteers to participate in a medical
study evaluating an experimental antiviral cream as a treatment for cold
sores (herpes labialis).
To be considered for this study, candidates must:
- be 18 years of age or older and in good health
- have a history of recurrent cold sores
- be willing to receive treatment and participate in evaluations
Involvement in the study will require an initial screening exam and clinic
evaluations on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 of the participant's next cold sore
outbreak. Treatment will continue for five days.
There is no cost to patients accepted into the study. All examinations,
laboratory tests and study treatment drug will be free of charge.
A stipend of $100 will be paid to individuals who complete the study.
For more information,
please call Sally Siano at 763-6880.

Users of the Michigan Terminal
System (MTS), the University's larg-
est e-mail system, have noted that
things are moving significantly slower
in recent months. Users complain that
signing on and off or just typing a
messagetakes longer compared to the
quick responses of last year.
The Information Technology Di-
vision (ITD) attributes the slower
speed to a rapid increase in the num-
ber of MTS users. Several times this
year, the system has reached 100 per-
cent of its processor capacity.
Also, MTS can handle a finite
number of users. When the system
reaches its limit, users seethe prompt,
"All interactive ports are busy." Sim-
ply put, the MTS processor can't lis-
ten to any more people.
While ITD searches for ways to
distribute processor time more effi-
ciently, MTS users can get a faster
response by signing on at non-peak
hours. ITD's Information Technol-
ogy Digest reports use is greatest at
about 11:30 a.m. and again at 2:30
p.m. Evenings and early mornings are
the best times to sign on if users are
looking for a faster response.
UPCOMING ITD CLASSES
Several times a week, ITD offers
computing classes free of charge for
University staff and students. Classes
cover topics such as e-mail, network-
ing, telecommunications and use of
applications such as Microsoft Word,
Excel and other popular programs.
This week's classes include "Win-
dows Next Step," "Intro to UNIX"
and "What is the Internet?"
Call 763-3700 for time and loca-
tion, or to register for a class.
'U' PROF. RECEIVES
NATIONAL AWARD
June Osborn, aprofessor of epide-
miology and pediatrics at the Univer-
sity, will receive a 1994 "Scientific
Freedom and Responsibility" award
from the American Association for
the Advancement ofScience (AAAS).
Osborn, a former dean of the
School of Public Health and former
chair of the National Commission on
AIDS, will receive the prize Feb. 21
in San Francisco: during the
association's annual meeting.
AAAS heralded Osborn as "one

Tchnolop
of the first scientists in the United 0
States to decry hatred and discrimina-
tion against people with AIDS."
AAAS boasts 140,000 members
and 300 affiliated science and engi-
neering organizations.
STARING AT HAIR
Assistant Dermatology Prof.
Bruce Nelson decided to take a closer
look at transplanted hair - a much
closer look.
Nelson used an electron tunneling
microscope, capable of magnifying
objects 400,000 times, to look at trans-
planted follicles. Transplanted hair is
often lusterless and curly for a time
after the procedure, and that can be
surprising to patients who formerly
had straight, shiny hair.
Hair transplants are most com-
monly performed on balding men.
Hair is taken from a part of the scalp
(commonly from the back of the scalp)
and replanted elsewhere on the head,
Nelson discovered transplanted
follicles undergo some trauma, and
tend to grow hair unevenly foi-up to a
year. But the condition is not perma-
nent, and hair looks healthier as the
follicle adjusts to its new locale.

01

Application For
BUICK
olunteer Spirit Award

MORE MB FOR YOUR
HOME DIRECTORY
ITD has decided to expand the
size of Institutional File System (IFS)
home directories from 3 to'5 mega
bytes. This was effective Jan. 1.
Users of campus computing sites
can create a home directory by choos-
ing the "Make me an IFS ho'e direc
tory" icon from the applications
server. A home directory allows users
to save files on the University server.
This lets users create a file at any
campus computing site and modify it
at another without having to deal with
the inconvenience of a floppy disk.
There are about 6,200 users with
IFS home directories at the Univer-
sity.

- By Daily Staff Reporter
Scot Woods *

STEP 1 (Please Print)

UStudent

®Faculty

DAlumnus

Applicant's Name:

Local Address:
Telephone: li

__ ,. n

Street

Apt#

City

State

Zip

Evenings

Day

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Social Security Number:.

Date of Birth:_

R

EDITORIAL STAF

.si .glaa, og n Cie

STEP 2

Describe volunteer activities with the following information for each:
(Print or type on a 8.5"x11" paper. Limit to ten or fewer volunteer activities.)

A. Volunteer Activity D. Contact Person
B. Number of Hours Involved E. Accomplishments/Results
C. Name, Address and Telephone Number of
Organization

NEWS David Shepardson, Managing Editor
EPITORS: Nate Hurley, Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Karen Talaski.
STAFF: Adam Anger,. Carrie Bissey, Janet Burkitt, Hope Calati, Jessica Chaffin, James Cho, Lashawnda Crowe, Lisa Dines. Demetnios
Efstratiou. Michelle Fricke, Ronnie Glassberg. Soma Gupta, Michele Hatty, Katie Hutchins, Judith Kafka, Randy Lebowitz, Andrea
MacAdam, Shelley Morrison, James Nash, Zachary Raimi, David Rheingold, Rachel Scharfman, Megan Schimpf, Lara Taylor, Maggie
Weyning, April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITOR: Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS: Jonathon Berndt (Editor), Andrew Taylor, Jennifer Angeles, Kimberly Albert.
EDITORIAL Sam Goodstein, Flint Wainess, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker, Jason Lichtstein.
STAFF Cathy Boguslaski, Eugene Bowen, Patrick Javid, Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Mo Park. Elisa Smith,;Allison Stevens.
LETTERS EDITOR Randy Hardin.
SPORTS Chad A. Safran, Managng Editor
EDITORS: Rachel Bachman, Brett Forrest, Tim Rardin, Michael Rosen"er. Jaeson Rosenfeld.
STAFF: Bob Ararson, Paul Barger, Tom Bausao, Charlie Srertrose, Aaron Burns, Scott Burton, Marc Diller. Darren Everson. Ravi
Coa.Ryan Herri ngtor, Brett Johnson. Josh Karp. Brent McIntosh, Dan McKenzie, Antoine Pitts, Melinda Roco, J.L. ROStam.Abadi.
Melanie Schuman, Dave Schwartz. Tom Seeley, Tim Smith, Elise Sneed. Barry Sollenberger. Doug Stevens, JeremhyStrachan,'Ken 4
Sugura. Ryan White.
ARTS Melissa Rose Bemnardo, Nima Hodaei, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater), Tom Erlewine (Music). Rona Kobell (Books), DarcyLockman (Weekend etc.). John R. Rybock
(Weekend etc.). Michael Thompson (Film), Kirk Wetters (Fine Arts). I
STAFF: Jordan Atlas, Matt Carlson, in Ho Ch~ung::Thomas -Crow"e, Andy Dolan, Geoff Earle, Josh Herrington, Kristen: Knudsen. Karen
Lee, Ganluca Montatti, Heather Phares. Scott Plagenhoef, Austin Ratner, Dirk Schulze, Sarah Stewart, Alexandra Twin. Ted Watts.

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