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January 21, 1994 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1994-01-21

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2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 21, 1994
MedStart conference to address issues of tomorrow

0

By MICHELLE LEE THOMPSON
FOR THE DAILY
Focusing on issues of health and family,
the second annual Medstart conference is
designed to provide students with an under-
standing of the cooperation necessary to cre-
ate "A Whole New World for Our Children,
Our Future, Ourselves."
Organizers said the event will try to teach
people from all disciplines of academia to

work together to create a better world for the
children of tomorrow.
Sean Haley, a School of Public Health
student, said the conference should be amaz-
ing.
"We all realize that health care is a multi-
faceted concern and we are all interdepen-
dent. We're all in this together," Haley said.
The conference features national experts such
as Helen Rodriguez-Triaz, past president of

the American Public Health Association, and
Woodrow Meyer, former commissioner of
health in the city of New York.
Medstart's goal is to educate students and
inform them of problems like substance abuse,
AIDS, adoption and foster care, health care
reform, poverty, violence and disablilties of
children.
Barbara Blum, president of the Founda-
tion for Child Development in New York , is

the keynote speaker. She will discuss how this
year's theme ties into Medstart's goals for the
future.
The conference is organized by Univer-
sity students in medicine, public health, nurs-
ing, law, social work and education. Althea
Hunte, a Medical student, is organizing the
event.
In a press release, Hunte indicated that this
year's Medstart theme is a response to a

comment by Marian Wright Edelman, head of
the Children's Defense Fund.
"The future of our children is too impor-
tant to leave to just politicians,just advocates,
just the public sector," according to the press
release.
The conference will be held tomorrow a
the Towsley Center in the University's Medi-
cal Center.

BUDGET
Continued from page 1.
restrain ourselves but not price our-
selves out of the market place."
As compared to other universities
across the nation, some administra-
tors view an education at the Univer-
sity as a good buy.
Regent Paul Brown (D-Mackinac
Island) said, "We provide a top-notch
education for one-fourth the cost
Michigan residents have to pay at
other schools."
For fiscal year 1994, state appro-
priations make up 13 percent of the
University's operating budget.

POLLACK
Continued from page 1.
at the regents, many of whom hold
powerful sway in the Democratic
party. The board's membership in-
cludes a former state party treasurer
and longtime contributors. Part of her
mission is to move from representing
citywide interests to statewide con-
cerns. That concern was reflected
yesterday, but as Walker and others
said, "Not at the cost of her beliefs."
And with the nomination still very
much up for grabs, it is a narrow line
to walk - between student concerns
and administrative ones.

Regents' Roundup

MARTY'S...IN APPRECIATION OF THEIR CUSTOMERS GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH A
A IN
DTRCH A--UCTION
Jan. 19 through 22
OPEN Wed., Thur., Fri. 9:30-9, Sat. 9:30-6:00
PRICES DROP EACH DAY!
FALL & WINTER MERCHANDISE FROM FAMOUS MAKERS -Austin Reed,
Corbin, Bill Blass, Sero, Enro, Pendleton, Racquet Club, Ruff Hewn

Duderstadt donates $10K to 'U'
President James Duderstadt and
his wife, Anne, gave $10,000 to the
University's Campaign for Michigan
in December. Duderstadt said the
funds are part of a larger $50,000
fund that the couple is giving over
several years.
He added that the money "would
probably go for student aid."
But he laughed when asked
whether he gave in December to avoid
CLOCK
Continued from page 1
ing warrant immediate attention, the
clock will not be repaired until some-
time next week, when the weather
warms up. In the meantime, Halsted
assured that the bells, which operate
on a separate system from the clock,
will continue to ring on schedule -
every 15 minutes.
LSA sophomore Steve Maringer
said he learned a lesson from the
tower's failure. "I looked up yester-
day and thought I was three hours
late. You don't realize how important
the Bell Tower is until its broken -
it's kinda like life."
- Daily Staff Reporter David
Rheingold contributed to this report

new taxes under the Clinton budget.
"No, I just get around to making
charitable contributions at the end of
the year," he said.
Additionally, Provost Gilbert
Whitaker and his wife Ruth made a
$14,750 donation in December to the
fund in their name supporting doc-
toral fellowships.
'U' pays court costs
The University complied with a
court order issued in the case, Booth
Newspapers, Inc vs. Board of Re-
gents, that requires them to pay the
newspaper's legal fees, which totaled
more than $183,000.
The order stems out of the 1988
case, which found that the regents had
violated the Open Meetings Act and
the Freedom of Information Act
(FOIA) in hiring Duderstadt that year.
The University has appealed a
FOIA request from The Ann Arbor

News regarding the case.
A Re-Hash of Hash Bash
In another ongoing legal battle,
the University is going back to court
to try to prevent the National Organi-
zation for the Reform of Marijuana
Laws (NORML) from holding its an-
nual Hash Bash rally promoting the
legalization of hemp on the Diag.
On Dec. 27, the University filed a
motion for summary disposition on
the constitutionality of the
University's Outdoor Common Ar-
eas Policy and has requested an oral
argument.
The policy regulates how and when
groups may use the Diag for events.
With the case back in front of
Judge Donald Shelton, who has ruled
in favor of NORML on numerous
occasions, the University may tailor a
new events policy if the present one is
ruled unconstitutional in its ongoing
quest to prevent NORML from taking
to the Diag in April.

Baker Recovering from Surgery
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Ar-
bor) missed yesterday's meeting.
Baker, who also missed last month's
session, is still recovering from sur-
gery to remove a subdermal
hematoma. The blood clot in his brain
was removed in December. He is ex-
pected to make a full recovery.
Kevorklan at Commencement?
Graduate student Dennis Denno
addressed the regents during the pub-
lic comments session yesterday, urg-
ing the boardmembers to invite Dr.
Jack Kevorkian as this year's com-
mencement speaker. Denno heads the
embryonic group, Students fo
Kevorkian. Kevorkian graduated fro
the University's medical school in
1952. When asked about bringing
Kevorkian to commencement, Pro-
vost Gilbert Whitaker did not com-
ment, but merely chuckled.
- by Daily Staff Reporters
James Cho and David Shepardson

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I'

GRE
Continued from page 1
Mike Reilly of the Ann Arbor
Princeton Review test-preparation
center said, "Computer intimidation
is a major factor.
"The GRE is a test that people
come back to. People who went to
school 20 years ago did not use com-
puters," he said.
The CAT costs $93 compared to
the $48 for the pencil-and-paper ver-
sion. Students receive their scores
immediately.
Ben Reames, an LSA junior, took
the CAT because he needed his scores
right away, but said he would have
preferred the traditional format.
"It's not how you are normally
tested. It's hard to read big, long se-
lections on the computer. It is just
foriegn," Reames said.
EnisuPp="* $tudy "Lw '
Copter R~om " Laundrjy !iacies
24 wrtunadL4 * Game TKart
Hfeat and Water Incftd d

By LISA DINES
FOR THE DAILY
The Princeton Review has for-
mally charged the Education Testing
Services (ETS) with violating the New
York Truth-in-Testing law.
The New York-based test-prepa-
ration company filed a letter against
ETS with the General Magistrate in
early December.
Princeton Review alleges that stu-
dents who take the Computerized
Adaptive Test (CAT) version of the
Graduate Records Exam (GRE) are
denied their rights under the state law.
MikesReilly, director of graduate
programs at the Princeton Review in
Ann Arbor, said "The law is designed
to allow students to review their per-
formance after the test. The new com-
puterized GRE exams are not releas-
ing anything."
In a written statement, the
Princeton Review said, "Since there
is no disclosure, ETS feels no obliga-
tion to replace the pool of questions
periodically."
The law requires that testing com-
panies allow students to order a copy of
the questions and their own resposes.
There is a provision in the law that
does not require ETS to provide this
service' for special administrations of
the test such as Sunday exams for
Sabbath observers. ETS argues the
computerized exam is a "special ad-
ministration" of the test, therefore
exempt from the New York law.
Ray Nicosia, director of public
relations for ETS, said there can be no
disclosure because the questions are
reused. He said this is necessary be-
cause the test is available to students
at any time by appointment. He added
ETS is currently researching a method
for disclosure.

"The real question is test secu-
rity," said Andy Lutz, director of de-
velopment for GRE test preperation
at the Princeton Review. "Students
who take the test later in the year are
at a real disadvantage." 0
The Princeton Review plans to
publish a list of words that it has
compiled from the computerized ver-
sion of the test.
"Because you are at an advantage
if you talk to a friend who just took the
test ... to try to level the playing field,
we are going to publish a list of words
that appear on the CAT version," Lutz
said.
But Nicosia said, "With the CATO
even if you and your friend are at the
same level, there is a good chance that
you won't see the same questions."
Nicosia added that for Princeton
Review to publish the list would be a
violation of copyright laws. ETS re-
cently won a case against Princeton
Review for publishing a copyrighted
exam in its coaching materials.
Until the computerized test be*
comes standard for all GRE takers,
the University plans to treat the CAT
scores and pencil-and-paper scores
equally.
"The University of Michigan
recieves it's scores on tape, therefore,
the scores are indistinguishable from
the pencil and paper scores," Aiko,
Nakatini, director of graduate admis-
sions, said in a written statement.
Tamar Galed, an LSA sophmore,
said she plans to take the test during
her junior year. She said she will take
the pencil-and-paper version.
"You should be able to review
your work and make sure," she said,
adding, "As much as people say they
don't, computer programmers do
make mistakes."

Princeton Review files siH
over computerized GRE

-.-.

mama

FRATERNITIES
*Find out what they are really all about during
winter fraterity rush
DID THE COLD KEEP YOU INSIDE?
DID YOU MISS THE MASS MEETING?
DID YOU MISS US IN THE FISHBOWL?
DON'T WORRY, THERE'S STILL
TIME TO JOIN US A T:
FRATERNITY RUSH CALENDER - WINTER 1994

1/23

1/24

1/25 1/26

1/27 1/28 1/29 1/30 1/31 2/1 2/2 23

HOUSE SUN. MON. TUES. WED. TH. FRI. SAT. SUN. MON. T
ALPHA DELTA PHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
ALPHA EPSILON PI 6-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
ALPHA TAU OMEGA 12-6 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
BETA THETA PI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
CHI PHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
CHI PSI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
DELTA CHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 8-11 7-
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
DELTA SIGMA PHI 4-8 7-9 7-9 7-9 5-7 5-9 7-9
DELTA TAU DELTA 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
DELTA UPSILON 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
KAPPA SIGMA 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-
LAMBDACHI ALPHA 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
PHI DELTATHETA 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
PHI GAMMA DELTA 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
PHI KAPPA PSI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
PHI KAPPA TAU 7:30-? 7:30-? 7:30-? 7:30-? 7:30-? 7:30-? 7:30-^
PHI SIGMA KAPPA 6-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 6-
PI KAPPA ALPHA 6-10 6-10 6-10- 6-10 6-10
PI KAPPA PHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
PI LAMBDA PHI 4-10 7-10 6:30-? 7-? 7-? 9-
PSI UPSILON 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
SIGMA ALPHA MU
SIGMA CHI 3-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
SIGMA NU 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
SIGMA PHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
TAU GAMMA NU
TAU EPSILON PHI 3-9 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-
TAU KAPPA EPSILON 4-10 7-10 6-10 6-10 7-10
THETA CHI 4-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
THETA DELTA CHI 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10
THETA XI 12-6 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-9

UE. WED. TH.

2/4
FRI.

Univerky Tower Apartments
536 S. Forest Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
761-2680
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron (near State)
Wednesdayy 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Dinner, discussion, study
663-9376 for more info
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Christian Reformed campus ministry)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
tone block south of CCRBI
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
SUNDAY WORKSHOP:
10 a.m. - "Come and See"
6 p.m. - "Appreciating God's Gifts
in Other Religious Faiths Without
Losing Your Own"
WEDNESDAY:
9-10 p.m. - R.O.C.K. student gathering
Fun, food, provocative discussion.
Rev. Don Postema, pastor
Ms. Barb O'Day, ministry of students,
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill), 668-7622
SU.NDlAY: Worship - 10 a.m.

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EDITORS: Hope Calati, Lauren Demmer, Karen Sabgir, Purvi Shah
STAFF: Adam Anger. Jonathan Berndt, Carrie Bissey, Janet Burktitt, James Cho, Lash~awnda Crowe. Jen DiMascio, Demetrios Efstratiou,
Michelle Fricke. Ronnie Giassberg, Some Gupta, Michele Hatty, Nate Hurley, Katie Hutchins, Judith Kafka. Sarah Klino, Randy Lebowitz,
Andrea MacAdam, Bryn Mickle, Shelley Morrison. James Nash, Mona Qureshi, David Rheingold, Rachel ScharfrnanMegan Schimpf,
David Shepardson, Shari Sitron, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor, Lare Taylor, Maggie Weyhing, April Wood, Scot Woods.
CALENDAR EDITORSAndrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL PAGE Andrew Levy, Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Julie Becker, Sam Goodstein, Jason Lichtstein, Flint Wainess.
STAFF: Cathy Boguslaski, Patrick Javid. Jim Lasser, Amitava Mazumdar, Mo Park, Elisa Smith.
SPORTS Ryan Herrington, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Brett Forrest, Adam Miller, Chad A. Safran, Ken Sugiura
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Breitrose, Aaron Bums, Scott Burton, Andy De Korte, Marc
Diller, Darren Everson, Ravi Gopal, Brett Johnson. Josh Karp, Brent McIntosh, Antoine Pitts, Tim Rardin. Melinda Roco. Michael
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Sollenberger, Tim Spolar, Doug Stevens, Jeremy Strachan, Ryan White.
ARTS Melissa Rose Bernardo, Nina Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jason Carroll (Theater). Tom Erlewine (Music), Rona Kobell (Books) Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), John R. Rybock (Weekend
etc.), Michael Thompson (Film), Kirk Wetters (Fine Arts).
STAFF: Jordan Atlas. Michael Baes Robin Barry, Matt Carison, Jason Carroll. fin Ho Chung, Andy Dolan, Geoff Earle. Johanna Flies,
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Phares, Scott Plagenhoef, Austin Ratner, John R. Rybock, Andrew Schafer, Dirk Schulze, Karen Schweitzer, Sarah Stewart, Michael
Thompson. Matt Thorbum, Alexandra Twin, Ted Watts.
PHOTO Michee Guy, Evan Petrie, Editors
STAFF: Anastasia Banicki, Arthony M. Cli, Mark Friedman, Mary Koukhab. Elizabeth Lippman, Jonathan Lurie, Rebecca Margolis,
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