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January 05, 1994 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1994-01-05

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SP TS enesday Trivia
What is the last team, besides
Michigan, to have won the Great
Lakes Invitational?
(Answer, page 2)

[*

inside SPORTSWednesday
'M' Sports Calendar 2
AP Football Top 25 2
AP Basketball Top 25 2
Close but No Sugiura 3
Football 3-6
Hockey 7
Men's Basketball 8
Women's Basketball 9
Wrestling 9

0

luesends

Woves

acng

*No roses, but it
still had meaning
T APA, Fla. - Postseason play decides
championships - except in NCAA Division I-A
college football, which sends half of its
postseason participants home winners. Since there are
no playoffs, when the championship is not at stake,
such as the case in the Hall of Fame Bowl New Year's
Day, there must be other reasons for playing.
Certainly, competition could not be considered
chief among them in this bowl. Michigan, favored by
over two touchdowns, thoroughly dominated N. C.
State, 42-7, scoring touchdowns in a myriad of ways.
So what did the Hall of Fame Bowl mean? Answers
varied of course, as differences in perspective resulted
in different responses.
Michigan coach Gary Moeller obviously could not
*reveal any disappointment. His stature as coach, a
virtually lifetime appointment at Michigan, forces him
to find the good in outcomes, not to be too upset with
any particular outcome. Having come to Tampa after a
long season, not fresh off preseason expectations, he
found the proverbial bright side to his team's No. 19
finish in the final coaches' poll.
"It means a lot," Moeller said.
""I feel a little bit like I did the
year we went to the Gator Bowl,
my first year as head coach. We
lose a few and then again we
show character and the guys come
back up front."
ANDY Seniors expressed genuine
DE KORTE satisfaction with their final
dE K OTE Michigan performance. While the
De Korte seniors' Big Ten title streak
broke, they will always take pride
in spearheading the effort needed to get the 1993
Season back on track, particularly co-captain and
standout defensive lineman Buster Stanley. He called
the meeting that brought back the fire to the latent
Michigan defense.
"For me as a senior," center Marc Milia said. "It
was extremely important to finish things off in such a
strong manner. If we wouldn't have ended with such a
great show here, it would have made me a little
regretful."
The younger players enjoyed the victory, and the
week in the sun, but they recognized that they were not
laying in the Rose Bowl.
"It's just another game like (Ohio State or Penn
State)," defensive back Clarence Thompson said.
"Playing in a bowl is a bonus for a good season."
Will the bowl be deemed a success?
See DE KORTE, Page 5

N.C. State routed by
'M' team effort, 42-7

By RYAN HERRINGTON
DAILY FOOTBALL WRITER
TAMPA, Fla. - The team.
While few concepts have been
emphasized more heavily by Michi-
gan coaching staffs over the past 25
years, it was indeed a total team effort
that propelled the Wolverines to a 42-
7 Hall of Fame Bowl victory over
N.C. State last Saturday in murky
Tampa Stadium.
Scoring on offense, defense and
special teams, the Wolverines took
advantage of six Wolfpack turnovers
to finish the 1993 season with their
fourth consecutive win.
"We seem to have a new feeling
on the team," said quarterback Todd
Collins, who threw for a modest 189
yards on 11-for-22 passing. "We knew
that if we had lost another game we
might have been one of the worst
(Michigan) teams record-wise in a
long while. None of us wanted that to
think about for the rest of our lives. At
the same time we knew we were a
better ballclub than our record indi-
cated."
Michigan ended its season with an
8-4 record, ranking 21st and 19th in
the Associated Press and Coaches'
polls, respectively.
After coming out sluggish in the
opening 15 minutes of play, the Wol-
verines settled into their traditional
running game early in the second quar-
ter, taking a 7-0 lead on a 26-yard
sweep by tailback Tyrone Wheatley.
Wheatley would gain 66 yards on that
drive alone and was well on his way to
the 124 yards he accumulated on the
day, good enough for MVP honors in
his second-straight bowl game.
But Michigan's first big play was
still to come as the Wolverine defense
forced N.C. State to punt on the fol-
lowing possession. Derrick Alexander
was deep for Michigan and took
Wolfpack punter Chad Robson's 49-
yard kick at his own 21.
"I first saw a guy coming down
pretty quick, but I knew someone was

suppose to block him so I decided to
go ahead and catch (the punt) instead
of fair catching it," Alexander said.
"It turned out that Walter Smith, he
was the guy who was suppose to block
him, he got his block. Steve King got
another block and I just ran."
Streaking up the middle of the
field, the senior split end and
returnman sprinted away from the
rest of the Wolfpack punt coverage,
taking it 79 yards for his second punt
return for a touchdown this season
and the fourth in his career.
"Anytime you get a punt returned
for a touchdown, it's a big play. It
kind of breaks the other team's back,"
said Alexander, who did not catch a
pass on the day.
At the same time Michigan began
to get into synch, N.C. State was play-
ing itself out of the ballgame. After
fumbling the ball away on their first
possession - the fifth time this sea-
son they have turned the ball over on
their opening drive - the Wolfpack
offense began to operate with some
success.
N.C. State's game plan was to
take advantage of Michigan's lack of
depth at the linebacker position by
throwing short passes over the middle.
While sophomore quarterback Terry
Harvey found many of his receivers
wide open in the flat, several dropped
passes dashed any potential scoring
chances.
"It was getting frustrating," said
Harvey, who went 13-for-27 for 108
yards on the day. "We kept popping
and popping but unfortunately things
didn't get on track. I thought we stuck
right with them. We just didn't make
some plays on offense."
Yet trailing 14-0, the Wolfpack
had a great opportunity to get back
into the game when they had the ball
down to the Michigan 18 with just
over five minutes remaining in the
half. On 4th and 1, N.C. State coach
Mike O'Cain decided to go for it,

Amani Toomer and Mercury Hayes celebrate Toomer's first half-ending touchdown catch.

See N.C. STATE, Page 5

Icers take sixth-straight GLI title

By ANTOINE PITTS
DAILY HOCKEY WRITER
The CCHA and NCAA tourna-
ments await the No. 1-ranked Michi-
gan hockey team in the new year.
However, the Wolverines had some
unfinished business to take care of in
1993. '
Michigan (18-1-1 overall) closed
the year out in style capturing its sixth
consecutive Great Lakes Invitational
title with a 4-2 victory over Michigan
State (10-6-3) last Wednesday before
17,031 at Joe Louis Arena.
The Wolverines advanced to the
final after an 8-3 defeat of Notre Dame
(7-9-2) last Tuesday.

Michigan battled illness and the
loss of four players-Jason Botterill,
Kevin Hilton, Ryan Sittler and Blake
Sloan - to the World Junior Hockey
Championships in the Czech Repub-
lic.
"We weren't the same team, obvi-
ously," Michigan coach Red Berenson
said. "We had four players missing
and Steve Shields and Brian Wiseman
were sick.
"Our team didn't look as good as
we thought it should have, but we got
through the games. We had a lot of
players that came up big and played
well."
Michigan held the Spartans score-

less until 9:13 remained in the third
period. Shields, after missing the
Notre Dame game with the flu,
stopped 21 of 23 shots for his 13th
victory of the season.
"We had a couple guys sick and
some guys at World Juniors," Shields
said. "I'm really proud of the way our
players came out and showed we are
a good team."
On the offensive end, tournament
MVP David Oliver struck twice in the
closing minutes of the first period to
send the Wolverines on their way.
With three minutes to go in the
period, Oliver took a pass from
Wiseman and one-timed it from the

left circle past Mike Buzak for his
15th of the year.
Oliver's second goal was more
unusual. Off the faceoff, Olivergained
control and skated to the left side of
the net. He flipped a backhanded shot
that fluttered up and over Buzak's
head and into the net with 20 seconds
left in the period.
"Taking the lead really helped us,"
Berenson said. "We were fortunate
on the second goal. That was kind of
a fluke goal, but it gave us a two-goal
lead at the end of the first period.
From then on I just thought we were
the better team."
See GLI, Page 7

.i
'V,7

:<>
4 . F
* Y
If N~
(

AP PHOTO

Michigan's Daivd Oliver earned MVP honors at this year's Great Lakes
Invitational. Oliver had two goals and an assist for the Wolverines.

.Wolverines breeze by
Boston University, 111-84

a

The Accidental

By RACHEL BACHMAN
DAILY BASKETBALL WRITER
When it was all over, there were
no encores.
True, the 13th-ranked Michigan
ken's basketball team upstaged Bos-
ton University, 111-84, Monday at
Crisler Arena. The Wolverines also
outrebounded the Terriers, 37-26, to
improve their record to 8-2.
"We needed to shake off the hang-
over effect of Arizona," Michigan
mah ee Fih. ca "Whet.e

away or making a steal.
"He just is such a relentless de-
fender and such a terrific open jump
shooter. He's going to have to get
significant minutes," Fisher added.
Crawford led the bench with 13
points and five rebounds. His room-
mate Olivier Saint-Jean notched seven
points while playing 14 minutes.
"Olivier's gaining confidence,"
Fisher said. "I think he's played ag-
gressive.
44 _ m _I. .ri r iN vy". . ^^

By ADAM MILLER
DAILY FOOTBALL WRITER
ARPON SPRINGS, Fla. -
The last time the Michigan
football team went to the Hall
of Fame Bowl, the Official
Michigan Tour stayed at the
Innisbrook Golf Resort in Tarpon
Springs, about 45 minutes
northwest of Tampa. Spread over
1,000 acres and featuring just about
every fitness activity imaginable,
the resort wowed the touring
alumni, faculty, staff and students.
This year, the Tour came back to

One sports editor's trip
Tampa on the Official T

Tourist
This year's Tour was another
to fantastic voyage, but it did differ
some from previous ones.
Wait. I'm getting ahead of
our myself. Let's start, as they say, at
the beginning.
TUESDAY, DEC. 28.
In the beginning, there was The
Badge. The Badge, a bright-yellow
name tag with a large blue 'M' on
it, is the first thing you receive
when you check in for your
chartered flight, and you wear it at
all times on your Tour. Well,

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